Tag: This Day in Labor History

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Above: Slaves at a coffee yard in a farm. Vale do Paraiba, Sao Paulo, 1882 On May 13, 1888, Brazil abolished slavery. The last nation in the Western Hemisphere to do so, it brought to an end the fundamental labor force of American colonization. Slavery was central to nearly the entirety of European conquest of […]
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On April 16, 1947, the SS Grandcamp, a French-registered ship of American origin, exploded in the harbor of Texas City, Texas. Carrying 2,200 tons of ammonium nitrate, this set off a chain reaction of explosions that killed at least 581 people, exposing the complete lack of safety for workers in the shipyards and leading to […]
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Above: Elsie Parrish On March 29, 1937, the Supreme Court decided the case of West Coast Hotel Company v. Parrish. This 5-4 decision upheld Washington’s minimum wage law for women as constitutional, arguing that it was not a violation of free contract doctrine because the state had an interest in protecting women’s health and ensuring […]
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On March 11, 1811, the Luddite movement began in Arnold, Nottingham, England, when textile workers destroyed the machines where they worked as a protest against the oppression they felt as workers. This highly misunderstood early movement of workers is primarily used today by technological futurists to justify their own positions and attack those who aren’t […]
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