Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On June 22, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, better known as the G.I. Bill, was signed into law. This landmark bill both played a massive role in improving the lives of the white working class and also strongly reflected the racial bias at the heart of the United States, deepening […]
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On May 9, 1909, Japanese sugar workers in Hawaii walked off the job in the first major strike action among these workers. It was far from the last and it was a direct challenge to the racialized hierarchy of work the imperialist Americans had erected in their unjustly taken colony. In the mid-nineteenth century, white […]
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On April 7, 1947, telephone operators for the major phone companies walked off the job. This action was the precursor to the formation of the Communication Workers of America, one of the most important unions in the nation today. Telephone operators struggled with low pay. A large chunk of the workforce, since telephones required the […]
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On April 1, 1951, members of the Textile Workers Union of America struck the Dan River Mills in Virginia, part of an attempt to organize the southern textile mills. This failed strike demonstrated the limited power of unions in the South and how northern leadership with little understanding of the region could undermine the limited […]
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