Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On February 23, 1959, the AFL-CIO Executive Council, meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico, passed a resolution to create the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee, an early attempt to organize the farmworkers at the bottom of the American labor force. While Americans idealized agricultural work from the Jeffersonian beginnings of the nation, underlying the agrarian myth […]
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On February 11, 1978, Gail Slentz and her fellow reforestation workers in the cooperative called Hoedads went to plant Douglas fir seedlings on a mountainside near southwestern Oregon’s Umpqua River. After four hours of work, Slentz experienced dizziness and quit for the day. The next day, she suffered mid-cycle menstrual bleeding that continued for several […]
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On January 17, 1915, the radical Lucy Parsons led an unemployed march of 10,000 workers in Chicago. Suppressed by the police, the size of the march impressed the city’s more establishment reform organizations and inspired a second march led by them that ended up in a sizable jobs program for the city’s workers. Chicago workers […]
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On December 30, 1828, 400 of Dover, New Hampshire’s approximately 800 “mill girls,” women working in the new textile plants, walked off the job in one of the nation’s first strikes and probably the first all-female strike in American history. Given how women are often erased from our labor history, it’s important to note how […]
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