Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On December 15, 1921, the Kansas National Guard arrived to break up women’s marches in support of a strike of coal miners in southeastern Kansas. That intervention, done with the open support of United Mine Workers of America president John L. Lewis who hated the independent and socialist UMWA local in that state, demonstrated the […]
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On November 21, 1927, Colorado state police massacred six striking coal miners at the Columbine Mine in Serene, in what was just one of so many instances in American history of government using police forces as the private strikebreaking army of employers. Colorado miners, both in coal and hard-rock, had helped define American labor history […]
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On October 29, 1889, whites in Hawaii lynched the Japanese organizer and merchant Katsu Goto in Hawaii after opening a store to compete with the plantation company store and advocating for labor organizing. This event would demonstrate how planters and other white migrants to Hawaii would use white supremacy and violence to establish control over […]
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On September 19, 1981, the AFL-CIO held Solidarity Day in Washington, D.C. This event was organized labor’s strongest reaction to the Reagan administration and although largely forgotten about today, deserves our attention as part of the history of protest and to broaden our popular understanding of labor during this era. In the aftermath of Reagan […]
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