Tag: This Day in Labor History

Home /
img
On November 22, 1919, a white supremacist terrorist organization called the Self-Preservation and Loyalty League murdered four union leaders organizing both white and Black workers at a sawmill in Bogalusa, Louisiana. Part of the interconnected white supremacist and anti-radical violence wave of terrorism during the Red Scare, the Bogalusa killings should be one of the […]
img
On November 11, 1942, the Congress of Industrial Organizations began its annual convention. One of the key parts of this convention was the creation of the Committee to Abolish Racial Discrimination, an official union effort to combat racial discrimination on the job within the government, at the workplace, and among its own members. Like every […]
img
On October 4, 1971, President Richard Nixon used the Taft-Hartley Act’s cool-down clauses to stop a longshoremen’s strike that was primarily over the response to containerization on ships. This strike demonstrated the continued power of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, it’s strong democratic traditions, and how unions responded to the growing automation that cost […]
img
On September 22, 1919, steel workers went on strike in Pittsburgh and other steel cities. One of the most epic strikes of the post-World War I period, it was also a complete failure, one that demonstrated both the terrible political conditions for organizing after World War I and the deeply flawed American labor movement that […]
1 2 35
It is main inner container footer text