Tag: This Day in Labor History

Home /
img
On June 5, 1939, the Supreme Court decided Hague v. CIO. This case decided that the streets were public spaces where unions could organize under the principle of the First Amendment, ending decades of corporations using their friends in law enforcement to shut down labor organizing on the street. Companies and law enforcement had long […]
img
On May 1, 1877, the Massachusetts Factory Safety Act, the first factory safety bill in the United States, passed in the Massachusetts House. This bill, as limited as it might have been, is important as the first step toward a regime of workplace safety that remains tragically incomplete nearly a century and a half later. […]
img
On April 6, 1905, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters began a sympathy strike in support of striking clothing cutters at Montgomery Ward in Chicago. This moment significantly raised tensions in the strike, leading to the second most fatalities of any twentieth century American strike. The failure of this strike would also lead to a severe […]
img
On March 31, 1921, Brookwood Labor College was formed at a labor conference in New York to provide adult education for workers. This is perhaps the most influential of the labor colleges, an important piece of our labor history and one that saw a revival in the 1970s and 1980s. Around 1914, unions and reformers […]
1 2 30
It is main inner container footer text