Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On August 29, 1933, the National Miners Union shut down mines in Gallup, New Mexico. This labor action, which in many ways pitted Mexican miners against Navajo miners, demonstrates the racial complexity of American labor history and how different cultural practices around politics and work can have a significant impact on the success of a […]
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On July 31, 1905, Matumbi tribesman in German East Africa (today, mostly Tanzania, or Tanganyika as it was known then) marched on the trading post of Samanga, burning cotton fields and the trading post itself. This was the beginning of the Maji-Maji Rebellion, one of the most important moments of resistance to the European colonization […]
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On July 9. 1640, a Virginia court ruled that a Black indentured servant who ran away was in fact a slave. This is a moment by which we can talk about the codification of chattel slavery as the key labor force in early Virginia, with implications that still dominate the nation’s culture nearly 400 years […]
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On June 22, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, better known as the G.I. Bill, was signed into law. This landmark bill both played a massive role in improving the lives of the white working class and also strongly reflected the racial bias at the heart of the United States, deepening […]
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