Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On May 14, 1889. leading coal workers meet with Kaiser Wilhelm to settle a strike that had brought 100,000 coal workers off the job in Germany’s Ruhr Valley. This was the largest coal strike in German history, at least to that time. This forced the Kaiser to abandon Bismarck’s repressive policies and introduce labor reforms. […]
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On April 28, 1941, the Supreme Court decided the case of Phelps-Dodge v. National Labor Relations Board. The Court ruled that Phelps-Dodge and other companies who had strikes could not place workers on a blacklist and ordered them to hand over back pay as well. This important ruling undermined one of the major tactics companies […]
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On April 17, 1937, tobacco workers in Richmond, Virginia went on strike in what became pioneering civil rights labor organizing in the South, laying the groundwork for the rise of the Black labor struggle after World War II. The 1930s were a heady time for Black organizing in the South. The New Deal changed the […]
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On March 20, 1956, workers at Westinghouse ended their strike after 156 days on the picket lines. This was a key moment in the battle over worker militancy that unions had largely already lost. Largely about production decisions over efficiency, the deeper issue was whether unions would agree to long-term contracts that would take away […]
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