Tag: This Day in Labor History

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Ten years ago today, new to this blog, I decided to start a series called “This Day in Labor History.” The first post was on the Homestead Strike in 1892. Intended to bring necessary knowledge about the labor movement and its history to the readers of this blog, it’s been one of the defining things […]
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On June 19, 1982, two Chrysler workers, a plant supervisor named Ronald Ebens and his laid-off stepson Michael Nitz, beat a Chinese-American draftsmen named Vincent Chin to death in the parking lot of a strip club in Highland Park, Michigan. This was the peak of the anti-Asian racism that accompanied the decline in auto employment and […]
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On May 23, 1977, the Supreme Court issued a decision in Abood v. Detroit County Board of Education, upholding public sector unions collecting union dues from non-members for purposes of collective bargaining. This case, a late blow against anti-union forces before the 1980s attacks on unions began that continue to the present, created the critical […]
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On May 16, 1910, the federal government created the U.S. Bureau of Mines to investigate the terrible conditions that killed thousands of miners a year and to attempt to regulate those conditions. It was something, but given the extremely lax atmosphere of regulation in Progressive Era America, it ultimately did very little to protect the […]
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