Tag: the death penalty

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Ten years ago the SCOTUS ruled that executing mentally retarded people was unconstitutional, but it did so in a fashion that allowed the states a lot of practical leeway in regard to implementing this policy. Characteristically, Texas has done a judicial end run around the decision, with the result that, if a stay isn’t granted, […]
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Stevens and the Machinery of Death

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On April 17, 2008
Given what bean correctly identifies as the complexity of today’s ruling in Baze v. Rees, I’ll have to leave discussion of the fractured holding until tomorrow. For now, let me discuss one interesting and unexpected development. For the first time since the nearly-retired Harry Blackmun, the Supreme Court now has a justice who believes the […]

Bad Signs for Baze

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On January 8, 2008
It’s been buried by NH primary news, but it’s worth noting that the Supreme Court heard Baze v. Rees yesterday. The case challenges Kentucky’s use of a three-drug cocktail to execute the condemned. By all accounts, it does not look good for Baze, who is challenging the procedure. As Linda Greenhouse recounts this morning, even […]

NJ To End Pointless Expensive Boondoggle

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On December 14, 2007
The New Jersey legislature has voted to abolish the death penalty, and Corzine says that he will sign the bill. Good. Some death penalty supporters will undoubtedly mention that a majority of the state’s citizens still support the death penalty, but this is misleading. When residents are asked to choose between the viable alternatives, what […]
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On November 7, 2007

For years, proponents of the death penalty have argued that it acts as a deterrent. This claim has been damn tough to prove, probably because it’s wrong. What’s ironic, though, is that the

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