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Nuclear Deals

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U.S. President Barack Obama, left and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi shake their hands after they jointly addressed the media after their talks, in New Delhi, India, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. Seizing on their personal bond, Obama and Modi said Sunday they had made progress on nuclear cooperation and climate change, with Obama declaring a "breakthrough understanding" in efforts to free U.S. investment in nuclear energy development in India. (AP Photo /Manish Swarup)
U.S. President Barack Obama, left and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi shake their hands after they jointly addressed the media after their talks, in New Delhi, India, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. Seizing on their personal bond, Obama and Modi said Sunday they had made progress on nuclear cooperation and climate change, with Obama declaring a “breakthrough understanding” in efforts to free U.S. investment in nuclear energy development in India. (AP Photo /Manish Swarup)

It’s late on Thursday evening, you’ve probably popped open a beer or had a glass of wine. Time for a light-hearted blog post considering the legacy of the U.S.-India nuclear deal a decade after its signing. Turns out it is, unsurprisingly, really complicated! In short, it’s real goal for the U.S. was to open up the Indian economy, strengthen ties with Israel, and isolate Iran, all of which succeeded. But allowing India to produce all this nuclear material has not brought nuclear energy into Indian homes and there is no accountability in the Indian nuclear program. And of course the Pakistan issue remains tremendously tricky, with the nuclear deal making solving the Kashimir problem even more difficult. The whole essay is a really interesting analysis if you are interested in such things.

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