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BREAKING! The White House is Absolutely Bonkers

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Jana Winter and Elias Groll got ahold of the memo that led to Rich Higgins’ resignation from the National Security Council (NSC), as well as some additional details about the whole mess, and, well, you need to read the story.

The full memo, dated May 2017, is titled “POTUS & Political Warfare.” It provides a sweeping, if at times conspiratorial, view of what it describes as a multi-pronged attack on the Trump White House.

Trump is being attacked, the memo says, because he represents “an existential threat to cultural Marxist memes that dominate the prevailing cultural narrative.” Those threatened by Trump include “‘deep state’ actors, globalists, bankers, Islamists, and establishment Republicans.”

The memo is part of a broader political struggle inside the White House between current National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster and alt-right operatives with a nationalist worldview who believe the Army general and his crew are subverting the president’s agenda.

Though not called out by name, McMaster was among those described in the document as working against Trump, according to a source with firsthand knowledge of the memo and the events. Higgins, the author, is widely regarded as a Flynn loyalist who dislikes McMaster and his team.

“It was about H.R. McMaster,” the source said. “So, when he starts reading it, he knows it’s him and he fires [Higgins].”

The story of the memo’s strange journey through the White House captures the zeitgeist of what has become the tragicomedy of the current White House: a son trying to please his father, an isolated general on a mission to find a leaker, a right-wing blogger with a window into the nation’s security apparatus, and a president whose closest confidante is a TV personality.

The memo itself is precisely the kind of unhinged ranting you would expect from the fringe right, but it’s also still pretty terrifying to know that this came from someone on the NSC staff.

A few other details worth noting come out of, or are related to, this passage:

In the meantime, however, the memo had been working its way through the Trump White House. Among those who received the memo, according to two sources, was Donald Trump Jr.

Trump Jr., at that time in the glare of media scrutiny around his meeting with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower during the presidential campaign, gave the memo to his father, who gushed over it, according to sources.

In a comedy of errors, Trump later learned from Sean Hannity, the Fox News host and close friend of the president, that the memo’s author had been fired. Trump was “furious,” the senior administration official said. “He is still furious.”

The memo lays out what it described as a concerted campaign to undermine the president.

“The administration has been maneuvered into a constant back-pedal by relentless political warfare attacks structured to force him to assume a reactive posture that assures inadequate responses,” it reads. “The president can either drive or be driven by events; it’s time for him to drive them.”

1. Remember the supposed firewall separating the President, Donald Trump, and his sons, runners of his business? Snort.

2. The problem, as always, is Trump.

3. McMaster’s position may be more precarious than champions of “the adults” realize.

Go read.

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  • Eric K

    In a related note, Gorka is out trashing Tillerson.

    So a low level guy who no one is even sure what he does is trashing the Secretary of State and he isn’t immediately fired?

    • dnexon

      There is too much “everything is bonkers” news to cover today. This displaced an intended entry in the Continuing Adventures of Dr. Sebastian Gorka, PhD.

      • LeeEsq

        Hungarian Man of Mystery. Now with goulash.

        • Yestobesure

          He is a ghoulish Hungarian.

      • farin

        That’s Dr. Sebastian v. Gorka, PhD.

        • Sebastian v. Gorka

          A remake of Maciste v. Hercules?

          • jmwallach

            Yeah but Hercules has his blood group tattooed on his left arm.

        • Gwai Lo, MD

          Dr. Sebastian v. Gorka, “PhD”

          • Origami Isopod

            To Be Scrupulously Fair, as with James D’Amore, I don’t think a Ph.D. would improve Gorka much.

      • Joe Paulson

        Natasha Bertrand‏Verified account @NatashaBertrand

        3h3 hours ago

        Lol. Heather Nauert [Dept. of State Spokeswoman and Cameron Diaz impersonator] called Gorka “Dr. Gorka,” caught herself, corrected to “Sebastian Gorka”

        • HugeEuge

          Defending Tillerson against Gorkmeister isn’t as painful as defending Sessions or McConnell from Trump, but it truly hurts not be able to join in piling much deserved abuse on all them.

    • Yixing’s Fluffer

      free-floating fascist*

      • He’s a Free-Floating Fascist,
        There’s got to be a twist,
        That Free-Floating Fascist
        Has such a supple wrist!!!

        • Leigh Grossman

          A supple wrist is crucial for those who can’t auto-fellate like Bannon.

          I tried to come back with a Tommy reference, but this administration is pretty much the opposite of Tommy. (Maybe Trump is the guy who hits on Tommy’s hot mom the minute Captain Walker goes missing?)

          • YNWA40515

            “Trumpy, can you hear me? Can you feel me near you?”

        • Mellano

          He’s a toady, oh, he’s a lackey, he’s a minion, he’s a henchman,
          He’s a fascist and a flunky, and a problem when he’s stoned
          He’s a walkin’ contradiction, partly truth, but mostly fiction
          Followin’ nobody’s directions when he’s on his bedroom phone.

        • Wojciech

          And then there’s his wicked Uncle Stevie, who would be glad if no-one sees or hears him when he goose-steps about.

      • Gwai Lo, MD

        What’s the opposite job to that occupation?

        • Yixing’s Fluffer

          …lifer deep state bureaucrat?

  • LeeEsq

    Trump is like one of the more deranged Roman Emperors, the type that didn’t understand that the entire God-Emperor thing was metaphorical rather than actual. This being modern times, we get a lot of crappy court intrigue but instead of the splendor of an actual court to make the back stabbing more palatable, we get rants about Cultural Marxists.

    • Megalovanian

      Trump is pretty much an elderly, senile Commodus (the real one, not the movie one)

      • wjts

        Elagabalus without the charm.

        • LeeEsq

          Nero without the musical talent but with the pyromania.

      • Wojciech

        Caligula would have blushed.

        • YNWA40515

          “Oh, you’ve been in the (White) house too long,” she said, and Trump–naturally—fled [to one of his golf courses].

          • Robbert

            Heaven knows I’m miserable now alright.

  • LeeEsq

    To paraphrase Henry II, “won’t somebody rid us of this troublesome President.”
    Note to the Secret Service, FBI, and anybody else. This is a literary joke and not meant to be taken literally.

    • MyOhMy

      Seriously?

    • Gwai Lo, MD

      Can they take it literarily?

  • aab84

    But who are the Right Mensheviks supporting?

    • LeeEsq

      We need to find somebody with a spotty goatee and bad teeth to be our Bukharin.

  • TJ

    “The administration has been maneuvered into a constant back-pedal by relentless political warfare attacks structured to force him to assume a reactive posture that assures inadequate responses,” it reads. “The president can either drive or be driven by events; it’s time for him to drive them.”

    I give it 7/10. Needs more words like “synergy”, “quantum” and “thinkfluence”.

  • Brownian

    What’s cultural marxism? The idea that all opinions are equal? Like how the consensus of 97% of climate scientists is equal to that of a Baptist minister who thinks a ‘core sample’ is what he does to the youth pastor after a particularly rousing sermon on the evils of sodomy?

    • The Weeping Cheeto

      It’s one of the alt-right’s imaginary enemies.

      • Me, I think it’s a made-up word, a politician’s word. A word so young fellas like you can wear a suit and have a job. What do you really want to know, that it’s just a nastier word for “political correctness”; a couple of words used by idiots, full of sound a fury signifying nothing? Is that what you want to hear?

        – William “Red” Shakespeare Freeman

    • Eric K

      I was thinking it had something to do with old timey clothes and beards, it always goes back to beards with the right.

      • LeeEsq

        Yes, its somebody who doesn’t agree with the Bolsheviks politically but likes them for their fine sense of fashion.

      • farin

        Similar to aesthetic Stalnism, the policy that all men should aspire to look like a young Jozef Djugashvili.

      • it always goes back to beards with the right.

        But, enough about Michele Bachmann.

        • Eric K

          I was hoping someone would pick up the double meaning there

      • Leigh Grossman

        Makes sense, since the Gilded Age was also the age of spectacular facial hair.

    • Rob in CT

      Saul Alinsky can explain it, I’m sure.

    • mnuba

      it’s another term for “”””cosmopolitan bias””””

      • Origami Isopod

        ITYM (((cosmopolitan bias)))

    • LeeEsq

      Cultural Marxism refers to any Jewish involvement in culture.

      • West

        I’m very sure you’re right that Higgins meant this to a large degree, but I suspect he was making a nod in the direction of gay and non-white involvement in culture, too. In my experience, these guys see certain “fellow travelers” behind every tree.

        • wjts

          People here who know more about it than I do (majeff, maybe?) have said that it’s a term that can be usefully applied to thinkers associated with the Frankfurt School. But for people who think Adorno is a brand of spaghetti sauce, it’s a more polite way of saying gays/Jews/feminists/blacks/etc.

          • Really, what is the fascination with saddling the Jewish people with the rather obnoxious, and not especially Jewish, Adorno?

            Is it like the fascination with examining whether Wittgenstein’s self-hatred stemmed from his Jewishness, in monographs that go hundreds of pages without mentioning that he was not raised Jewish and was a very pious Catholic?

          • majeff

            Whenever they go after the Cultural Marxism of the Frankfurt School, I always wonder why they can’t get their hate on for Weber.

        • LeeEsq

          In old Cold War speak, when you wanted to decry Jewish involvement in American culture but with a certain delicacy you would talk about cultural Marxists. wjts is right in that it is also a very oblique reference to the Frankfurt School, all of whom were at least partially Jewish.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankfurt_School#Cultural_Marxism_conspiracy_theory

          • wjts

            Post-Cold War, I think.

      • You’re reading it too narrowly, it applies to the entire Jewish industry as a whole.

    • Domino

      Considering I know the type of person he is, I’m honestly shocked there is no mention of the Frankfurt School. For the alt-right, cultural marxism and the Frankfurt School are their not-so-subtle ways of stoking anti-semitism.

      • I thought they were synonyms.

        But the only person I’ve ever heard associate any of the Frankfurt School’s writings with Jewishness was a somewhat philosemitic professor who encouraged Jewish students to find a model for being Jewish in the world in the Catholic-from-birth Adorno.

        • Eric K

          I always thought the Frankfurt school was liberal protestants, which to these guys probably is all the same I guess.

          • Well, I guess in 2017 the Frankfurt School is Juergen Habermas, who’s a liberal Protestant. But for unknown reasons the ones who published in English with American publishers or taught at US universities were Jews, and obviously those are the ones who matter. Oddly, the German version of the Wikipedia page has a section called “Nachkriegsgeschichte” though.

      • Vault Boy

        The Frankfurt School gets more than a mention. See page 4.

    • Hogan

      “Cultural relativism” wasn’t viscerally scary enough, so they rebranded it.

      • Seriously, the alt-right has taken on cultural relativism and postmodern theory, post-truth and all (it seems not unreasonable to call them right-Hegelian), and need a way to distinguish themselves from a left who accepts most of the same theory but takes it from Marx and Marxist theorists.

    • wengler

      Cultural Marxist is the rightwing’s new name for the people they hate. It’s really not worth actually dissecting it.

    • Unemployed_Northeastern

      It’s the Reagan administration. It has to be. As I pointed out in a LGM thread a few days ago, this memo notes how cultural Marxists have allied with Islamists since the 1980s, and the 1980s was when the Reagan admin was illegally selling arms to Iran to pay for right-wing paramilitary death squads in Central America, the Reagan admin was secretly arming the Afghani mujahedeen (including several future allies and compatriots of Bin Laden), Rumsfeld was shaking Saddam’s hand – I think around the time Saddam got the key to the city of Detroit – and so on. So obviously it must mean that the Reagan admin were cultural Marxists.

      Either that or it’s a word salad of incomprehensible alt-right hate mongering.

      • That actually makes sense: cultural Marxism is the unholy alliance of the Frankfurt School with Reaganite neoliberalism. That is, it makes sense if you think Vladimir Putin is the real defender of the free world, and the US is the root of all evil. These guys aren’t supposed to think that. Someone ought to tell them.

        • sigaba

          “Ours is not to question why, ours is but to do or die. Into the valley of death rode the 600…”

    • Stag Party Palin

      It’s a word side-salad. Part of the right’s effort to come up with meaningless catch phrases.
      I was in Santa Fe recently, avoiding the shitty art that has taken over the town (for the last 40 years). One gallery listed its tenant as a “metaphysical realist.” Run. Run away.

    • JustRuss

      Let’s go to the source:

      …he represents “an existential threat to cultural Marxist memes that dominate the prevailing cultural narrative.” Those threatened by Trump include “‘deep state’ actors, globalists, bankers, Islamists, and establishment Republicans.”

      So clearly, cultural Marxists are spooks, bankers, Islamists, and Republicans. You know, the usual suspects when you think of commies.

      • You missed that “bankers” is invariably code for “Jews”.

    • Guest

      TL;DR versions seems to be: Used by People who hate Mel Brooks.

  • rewenzo

    This memo is 7 single spaced typed pages. No way Trump read it. Fake news.

    • West

      Good point.

    • The Great God Pan

      The article doesn’t specifically say that he read it. By “gave him the memo” the source could have meant that they acted it out with GI Joes while he clapped and giggled.

      • Nigel Tufnel

        I wish I could upvote this comment infinity times.

      • sigaba

        This is like the story about the producer Jon Peters, who many screenwriters believe is illiterate because he insists on writers never handing him a script, but doing a dramatic reenactment for him while he lazes on a couch.

  • West

    Re: “3. McMaster’s position may be more precarious than champions of “the adults” realize.”

    Who’s going to fire him? Trump? Trump’s the biggest schlapp-schwanz who ever did occupy the White House. He has intense desire and motive to fire Sessions, but he can’t get it up to actually do so. Best he can manage is to harass him.

    I don’t say this as a particular fan of McMaster or of the theory that the “adults” are running the show. I’m just saying I don’t think Trump has the moxie to fire McMaster.

    • Gwai Lo, MD

      That attempt would end in a humiliating display of incompetence and incontinence.

    • sigaba

      If he does it will be by tweet, or in the most cowardly and Parthian-shot fashion. He’ll fire McMaster before reproaching him over anyone he’s fired. Loyalty means there’s no accountability.

    • The Attorney General is harder to fire than the WH Chief of Staff. And Trump’s already proven he can fire the Chief of Staff.

      • West

        This is true. But Priebus was someone Trump clearly despised, and Priebus is also not exactly the Rock of Gibralter, and yet look how long it was from when we first saw reports that Trump wanted Priebus gone, until Priebus was actually gone.
        I’m not looking for an argument: I obviously have no idea whether or when Trump will terminate McMaster. You’re very definitely right that he can do so easier than firing Sessions. But as for McMaster, I’m just saying that all I see from Trump is the deepest sort of cowardice; he talks tough, but really isn’t at all. And dumping a general would be a different task that bringing in the Mooch to torpedo Priebus. He pulls something like that on McMaster, and the next version of Mooch will probably get eaten alive. And I just have a hard time imagining trump growing enough spine to throw down with McMaster. This perception of mine does not fit into an “adults in charge” scenario, more like a different variant on chaos.
        And, having said all that, I will also observe that I have always firmly believed that cowards are by far and away the most dangerous people. That’s especially true if they’re male and deeply vested in traditional definitions of masculinity, and it becomes hyper-true if the coward is Commander in Chief of the US armed forces. Or, phrased differently, I’m not suggesting Trump’s cowardice defangs him; quite the contrary.

  • Every day, I rejoice that these people are so inept and so prone to fighting with each other instead. Also every day, I dread what’s going to happen when the Republicans get around to electing *competent* fascists.

    • LeeEsq

      Going to have to find competent fascists first. There might not be any in the United States, God willing.

      • farin

        We’re literally making due with Hungary’s castoffs. That’s grim.

        • LeeEsq

          When buying the badly mad Communist knock off product is a good idea.

        • LeeEsq

          I am disappointed that a nation as wealthy we are couldn’t afford a high grade Italian fascist though.

          • Hogan

            Gabriele D’Annunzio or GTFO.

        • Wojciech

          “Polak, Węgier — dwa bratanki,” as my dziadzia used to say.

          Given the truckload of buraks that Kaczyński bused into Warsaw to give Donald a warm welcome when he came to town, I’m sure that there are some Polish nitwits willing to step up if Sebastian goes down.

      • You know Dick Cheney sits at home gnashing his teeth in rage at how they’re squandering all those opportunities.

        “Bastards! I would’ve had all the reporters in camps by now! And they’d love me for it! Bastards!”

        • LeeEsq

          We must take solace with the little joys in these troubling times.

      • Bruce Baugh

        But as with Napoleon’s comment about “great” generals, it may well be feasible to find some whose luck hasn’t yet run out, which is pretty much like competence until the odds catch up.

    • GeoX

      To be slightly optimistic, I would note that the very qualities that got Trump elected, sort of, are natural signs of incompetence. Sure, you can say, omg, what if he were COMPETENT, but I really think if he had been competent, he would have lost a lot of his appeal.

      • Yestobesure

        But THIS incompentent? Surely it’s more than was necessary

    • Daniel Elstner

      As I have a mean streak today, I’d like to point out that the Nazi administration was also known for dysfunction and infighting.

      However, in the case of the Nazis the common interpretation is that this was by design. Setting up conflicting responsibilities cemented Hitler’s position as indispensable final arbiter. However, I just found this interesting characterization from The Nazi State:

      Hitler certainly possessed far more power than another other individual or agency in the Nazi state – but he was also a lazy and sometimes vague ruler who left much of the work up to others. Hitler was not an experienced politician, nor was he much interested in administration or organisation, developing long-term planning or detailed policies. He instead preferred to dictate grandiose visions and vague orders, leaving the details and specifics to be devised by his subordinates. Those who pleased Hitler by presenting him with good suggestions or policies were praised and rewarded; some were welcomed into his inner circle, the highest accolade of all. This created a culture of competition and sycophancy, as leading Nazis competed against each other to impress the fuhrer.

      Hmm…

    • Daniel

      As I have a mean streak today, I’d like to point out that the Nazi administration was also known for dysfunction and infighting.

      However, in the case of the Nazis the common interpretation is that this was by design. Setting up conflicting responsibilities cemented Hitler’s position as indispensable final arbiter. However, I just found this interesting characterization from The Nazi State on alpha history:

      Hitler certainly possessed far more power than another other individual or agency in the Nazi state – but he was also a lazy and sometimes vague ruler who left much of the work up to others. Hitler was not an experienced politician, nor was he much interested in administration or organisation, developing long-term planning or detailed policies. He instead preferred to dictate grandiose visions and vague orders, leaving the details and specifics to be devised by his subordinates. Those who pleased Hitler by presenting him with good suggestions or policies were praised and rewarded; some were welcomed into his inner circle, the highest accolade of all. This created a culture of competition and sycophancy, as leading Nazis competed against each other to impress the fuhrer.

  • NewishLawyer

    I’d like to say this thinking is new but it really isn’t. My reading of Perlstein has shown me that fever dreams have long existed in American politics and especially on the Right. It isn’t even unique in higher ups. There were always politicians and military brass prone to wild fever dreams and conspiracy theories.

    But I guess there were always cooler heads in charge…until now.

    It was nice knowing everyone.

    • LeeEsq

      So long and thanks for all the fish.

    • aab84

      Curtis LeMay.

      The heads in charge weren’t all that cool.

      • NewishLawyer

        LBJ was in charge

      • jmwallach

        My dad had a great collection of stuff from his VP run because his campaign HQ was near Kenyon.

  • tsam100

    Also got a kick out of Trump implying that McConnell’s job is in danger over their Health Kill bill dying as it lived. It sounded like Trump thinks he can fire him or something.

    • sigaba

      We know in his interactions with Flake that he seems to know that he can’t fire senators. Trump instead believes that he has such massive political support among Republicans that he can render harmless any Republican politician and can turf them out of office, which to be fair appears to be correct. Trump also seems to think senators are always up for reelection so Mitch has that on him.

  • LeeEsq

    So in case Ryan and McConnell decide to play hardball, what are we willing to sacrifice to get Trump removed from office Constitutionally?

    • randykhan

      At least a goat. Possibly a cow.

      • Gwai Lo, MD

        A turtle?

  • Hogan

    I’m just glad HIggins landed on his feet, what with his new job ghostwriting for Greenwald.

  • dp

    My God, these people are nuts.

    I’ve never understood the obsession with “political correctness.” As best I can tell, “PC” is what my sainted Southern grandmother taught me as “manners.”

    • NewishLawyer

      That’s pretty much what it is but now it applies where it used to not and people can’t stand that.

    • When I lived in the South in the 80s, “well-mannered” individuals still used the n-word with abandon. “PC” has changed what “manners” means, for the better. And that’s what conservatives hate.

  • osceola

    Wait…..what?

    Does this mean LT.GEN McMasters is a cultural Marxist who shitcanned Higgins for exposing the truth of the master plot???

    And I thought they were just a bunch of assholish comp lit faculty.

  • ColBatGuano

    Doesn’t that memo basically boil down to: “No one should oppose the President.”?

    • Mellano

      I’d add, ” . . . and if they do, they’re either SJWs or fellow traveling c-cks.”

  • humanoidpanda

    This memo is why the Greenwald “deep states neocons OMG” stuff is so repulsive. McMsaster surely has views on Syria and Afghanistan I find deeply misguided and harmful. But the “nationalists” Greenwald views as the lesser evil are pretty openly arguing that domestic opposition to the president is a national security issue. It’s absolutely nuts to consider the former more dangerous than the latter.

    • Kevin

      What struck me was how similar this was to Greenwalds take. Almost makes you think…

    • Duvall

      Well, unless you live on a different continent from the proposed crackdown.

  • Joe Paulson

    “an existential threat to cultural Marxist memes that dominate the prevailing cultural narrative”

    Reminds me of this Lego Batman commercial that keeps on playing during ball games. “I was being sarcastic!” But, probably not in this case.

    • farin

      Only this bunch of chucklefucks would assume that “an existential threat to…memes” is something a real person would be concerned about.

    • Damon Poeter

      ‘An existential threat to cultural Marxist memes that dominate the prevailing cultural narrative”

      The above sentence in the version Trump was shown by Trump Jr had been helpfully paraphrased ‘TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP memes TRUMP TRUMP dominate TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP’ … which explains his affection for the Higgins memo to this day.

  • Paul Thomas

    It’s funny because I’m currently reading a book about Nazi rule in Europe and the author literally just described how they also had midlevel bureaucrats writing weird memos about “cultural Marxism.”

    Wait, that’s not funny at all.

    • jmwallach

      Out of curiosity is it Third Reich at War?

      • Paul Thomas

        Hitler’s Empire.

    • postmodulator

      “I wouldn’t worry. Hitler came to power with a minority of the vote, and the right-wing in Germany only formed a coalition with him out of convenience, and even that was only made possible because the left was divided, but by contrast Trump…uh…”

      SFX: gunshot

  • Good article on “Cultural Marxism?”
    http://marxistupdate.blogspot.com/2011/08/shibboleths-of-cultural-capitalism.html

    Anyone who has spent considerable time participating in political discussions is bound to run across the term “Cultural Marxism” at one time or another. It is a term typically used by the most extreme elements on the right, such as neo-Nazis and their fellow travelers, but in recent years it has become more prominent within mainstream conservative circles. Up to recently, the term has been little more than an ill-defined right-wing buzzwordin the same league as “feminazi,” “gay agenda,” “politically correct” or “community organizer.”
    . . .
    First, to understand cultural Marxism as a phrase is nearly impossible. The phrase itself is meaningless. Next time you find yourself in a discussion where your partner invokes cultural Marxism, ask them to define exactly what that means. Most people don’t even attempt to answer. Those that do give a definition that has nothing to do with Marxism. They may be totally convinced that cultural Marxism is destroying their society, to the point of obsession, yet they stammer and hesitate when asked for a coherent definition.

    • The current top post at that site begins, “The shrill and unrelenting witch hunt by liberal Democrats, some Republican politicians and most of the bourgeois news media who accuse President Donald Trump of “colluding” with Moscow to “influence” the 2016 presidential elections, has reached a new fever pitch.”

    • Linnaeus

      “Marxism” functions as a “devil word” in US political discourse. So you attach it to anything that you don’t like and it signals that said thing is bad because anything connected to “Marxism” is bad, especially for people who have little to no idea what Marxism actually is.

    • Gwai Lo, MD

      This one is satirical, but I’m guessing some folks will conveniently plead ignorance of Poe’s Law.

      http://www.greenberg-art.com/About_the_artist.html

    • ExpatJK

      Oh wow, that’s quite the cartoon. Although I must say I am disappointed in these modern anti-Semites. Can’t they update their pictures? We have seen the same hook nose caricature time and again, it’s rather dull. To paraphrase the Joker, we deserve a better class of anti-Semites.

      • sigaba

        The “steps” motif is also lifted from a famous catholic cartoon showing a young priest’s descent from doubting the virgin birth to atheism.

    • Lurking Canadian

      I’ve always seen “cultural Marxism” as just general butthurt about inclusion of women and minorities in fiction, but man, that cartoon is not subtle. I’m going to have to read it as (((cultural Marxism))) from now on.

  • MariedeGournay

    It’s like all their creative writing exercises end up plagiarizing the “Protocols of the Elders of Zion.”

    • BigHank53

      Well, they’ve already ripped off “The Turner Diaries” enough times.

      • N__B

        They may have misread it. They’re giving us “The Day of the Dope.”

  • jmwallach

    . Candidate Trump’s rhetoric in the campaign not only cut through the Marxist narrative, he did so in ways that were viscerally comprehensible to a voting bloc that then made candidate Trump the president; making that bloc self-aware in the process.

    See Jill was right! Trump developed classbloc consciousness!

  • Having read the first two pages, I think it’s very possible a “liberal” college professor wrote “you need to work on basic grammar, have you tried your PC grammar checker,” and he thought s/he said “you aren’t PC enough.”

  • Mellano

    As a God-pissing-on Cultural Marxist, ordinarily I despise prescriptivist “rules” of grammar as a form of cultural oppression. I steal copies of “The Elements of Style” from libraries and burn them while screaming “Allahu Akbar.”

    That said, sometimes following advice like “avoid dangling modifiers” helps to clarify one’s thoughts. This memo’s content is bonkers. Rich Higgins sounds like a lunatic hammering his keyboard into a pile of plastic fragments. But if he’d taken a little more time to explain the logical relationships between the various right-wing mad libs words dropped into his sentences, maybe he’d sound marginally less unhinged. Maybe he’d even realize his ramblings don’t hold together. (and aybe I’m a Russian jet pilot).

    As a Judeo-Christian culture, forced inclusion of post-modern notions of tolerance is designed to induce nihilistic contradictions that reduce all thought, all faith, all loyalties to meaninglessness.

    • Ithaqua

      Judging from that document, we won!

    • I’d be interested to see what the pro-RW academics have to say against it, but I predict they’ll first blame liberals for making the poor boy what he is, and next say we need to hire more like him who can explain his subculture’s rot from the inside.

      • Mellano

        I’m really curious about where this guy came from. I assume he’s self-taught, because somehow he sounds more like a Breitbart correspondent than someone who was mentored by a university IR department’s resident right winger or something. And yet he had a policymaking job in the White House anyway, because the President is Donald f-ing Trump.

        • FlipYrWhig

          He sounds like every wannabe campus-conservative “intellectual” since 1985, one who’s written at one of the “Review” campus-right publications, like those that spawned D’Souza and Ingraham.

    • postmodulator

      But if he’d taken a little more time to explain the logical relationships between the various right-wing mad libs words dropped into his sentences, maybe he’d sound marginally less unhinged.

      If he could write clearly, it would mean he could think clearly. If he could think clearly, he wouldn’t believe the things he does.

    • FlipYrWhig

      It sounds like that notorious/laughable memo about how no one could stop Newt Gingrich’s presidential campaign, the one that Colbert had Jon Lithgow dramatically re-create on his show.

  • DJ

    Good god. Between all the inane idiotic word salad, this memo is terrifying.

    The conclusion’s comparison with Lincoln is an unabashed call for civil war (literal civil war), which is the purpose of the entire screed. This is essentially a declaration of war against America.

  • Wojciech

    At least Reagan, Bush pere and Dubya could be counted on to give America a higher quality of loon to moon about in their administrations. This is a memo is a first rate example of the Dunning-Kroger principle.

    • postmodulator

      Not all that much more high-falutin’.

  • Origami Isopod

    “an existential threat to cultural Marxist memes…” Yabbut are they dank cultural Marxist memes?

    http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/522/470/b02.jpg

    • Damon Poeter

      Dat ain’t mah cul-chul Marxist hay-a-tij! Id dat yo cul-chul Marxist hay-a-tij?

  • Tige Gibson

    Up until now many people still do not know that “Deep State” refers to the Jews.

  • JamesWimberley

    Kevin Drum has extracts of the memo.

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