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Who radicalized Robert Dear?

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Is a question I’m not sure this society is equipped to address. However, the New York Times is almost ready to concede that his motivation has something to with anti-abortion politics.

“I’m guilty. There’s no trial,” the accused mass killer Robert L. Dear Jr. told a startled courtroom here on Wednesday. “I’m a warrior for the babies.”

It was a bizarre development in a horrific case, with Mr. Dear using his first court appearance since the deadly rampage at a Planned Parenthood clinic to disrupt the proceedings. There were angry outbursts, declarations of guilt and expressions of anti-abortion politics.

“Let it all come out,” he said in one of a series of outbursts that seemed to remove any doubt about his motivation. “The truth.”

I’m not seeing the bizarre about a terrorist using a court hearing to spout bits of his manifesto, but that’s just me.  I’m also not sure what “seemed” is doing in the last paragraph, but I’m surprised it hasn’t cracked under the strain.

And over in The Corner, you will not be shocked to learn that David French is running around with a rather tattered fig leaf:

Rather than further publicizing the words of Robert Dear, I prefer the words of the Southern Baptist Convention’s powerful Nashville Declaration, proclaiming the pro-life movement’s repudiation of violence to protect the lives of the unborn.
[Tl; dr – Those guys aren’t with us!]

And then, as it so often does in NROville, it gets weird:

As I said in a piece days after the shooting, There is no coherent moral argument for pro-life violence. That’s precisely why it is so rare, and that’s precisely why it will remain rare until America has a moral awakening, reverses Roe, and protects all human life — from conception until natural death.

No coherent moral argument sums up everything that comes out of places like NRO. If I’m reading this correctly, he contends that pro-life violence is rare. (For a given value of rare that allows NROites & Pals to poo-poo anti-abortion violence committed by Christians while they soil their underpants over violence committed by Muslims.) However, it won’t be rare after America decides that life begins at conception and ends at natural death?

I’m convinced!

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  • Funkhauser

    They consider abortion to be murder and they are in favor of the death penalty for murderers, yet there’s no moral case for executing murderers?

    • Just a Rube

      Yes, that struck me as well. Abortion opponents like to throw around comparisons to the Holocaust, and the most recent “controversy” is based on the lie that Planned Parenthood is murdering “babies” and selling their organs for a profit. And then can’t see why their followers might see a “moral case” for violence?

    • ajay

      You caught the “until natural death” bit too? Yes, that was interesting. So, no more death penalty? And, interestingly, no more armed forces? Or would those both be justified as “self-defence”? (But then abortion could also be justified as that, if the health of the mother is at risk…)

      • BiloSagdiyev

        I think they mean. “no voluntary euthanasia for elderly cancer patients in great pain, we’re Catholics, please.”

  • Docrailgun

    Coat hangers in back alley clinics for everyone!

    • Snarki, child of Loki

      “Coat hangers in back alley clinics for everyone!”

      Nah, just for the anti-abortion fundies getting their post-natal abortion for acephalic defects.

  • charluckles

    I got out of the boat. But I do hope Mr. French reads his comments as well, he can also enjoy his fellow pro-lifers arguing the morality and necessity of murdering anyone associated with “baby-killing”.

    • sharculese

      Part of writing for NRO is ignoring that your audience is exactly as unhinged as you keep insisting they aren’t.

  • asifis

    No reason to be fair, but I did take the statement to mean that “pro-life violence” would be nonexistent after his hoped for reversal. As usual, though, thoughtless thoughts, horribly expressed.

    And I blame Carly.

    • sharculese

      Cool. All we have to do to end terrrorism is let the terrorists win. It sounds so simple when you say it that way.

  • joe from Lowell

    That’s precisely why it is so rare, and that’s precisely why it will remain rare until America has a moral awakening, reverses Roe, and protects all human life — from conception until natural death.

    If I’m reading this correctly, he contends that pro-life violence is rare. (For a given value of rare that allows NROites & Pals to poo-poo anti-abortion violence committed by Christians while they soil their underpants over violence committed by Muslims.) However, it won’t be rare after America decides that life begins at conception and ends at natural death?

    I think you’re reading it correctly, but he wrote it incorrectly.

    Imagine a ballplayer saying, “I’m going to keep being disciplined at the plate until we win the World Series.” He’s not saying he’ll start swinging at bad pitches after that; he’s just saying his team is going to go all the way, and he’s going to be disciplined at the plate while they do it.

  • LosGatosCA

    However, it won’t be rare after America decides that life begins at conception and ends at natural death?

    Naturally all women having abortions will die in the attempt and doctors who unnaturally assist women in not dying will bring the ultimate death penalty on themselves. It’s Sharia christianist law, naturally.

  • Crusty

    I read somewhere that as a young man he attended a madrassa sunday school and as an adult, he once gave money to fund a madrassa church.

    Also, he listened to the rhetoric of Reverend Wright Carly Fiorina without objecting.

  • Karen24

    1. Right wingers use “would seem” and “seem” as a vocal tic to avoid actually saying anything concrete. It’s so common I’ve come to callling it the “deflective tense.” I’m surprised to see the NYT adopting the practice, but there it is. I’m happy to learn that others notice this as well.

    2. “Natural death” has taken on a new terror for me in the last week. My 84-year-old father had a major stroke last Wednesday, and on Monday the doctors told my mother he was terminal. I drove to Dallas to be there when she disconnected the machines. Tuesday, the doctors changed their opinion, so he’s still hooked up to a ventilator and with tubes in every orifice. (You really don’t want to know how hospitals deal with incapicitated patients ability to poop.) He can move muscles attempting to respond to us, and I think maybe he knows who we are, but he can’t speak and his eyes don’t respond. His Directive specifically rejects extraordinary measures if he will not have a quality of life. So, unless he recovers remarkably, in a few days my mom and I will have to make some very unpleasant and very final decisions, the result of which makes us murderers in Mr. French’s formula. Our situation is not nearly as clear as Terry Schiavo, even though my father left clear directions. Fifty years ago, “natural death” would have been last Thursday or Friday, but medicine has made some amazing advances, just not quite enough for us.

    I suppose my point, besides just venting, is that French shows so clearly how stupid his side of this argument is. These are not simple decisions; they aren’t made by cold-hearted monsters or robots, and criminal law simply isn’t designed to address this. If French’s preferred policy were in place, I think my mother would have waited a few hours to call the paramedics instead of taking the chance that medicine could restore my father to his former level of health. Is that what we want to happen?

    • Bruce B.

      Karen, very sorry to hear it. I was only involved in a supporting role in dealing with my father’s terminal decline, and it was still hard enough. Sympathy and best wishes to all of you involved, and talk to a nurse or someone at the hospital about a crisis counseling recommendation – not someone who will tell you what to do, but will provide some reinforcement about the worth and merits of what you’re doing.

    • Murc

      Right wingers use “would seem” and “seem” as a vocal tic to avoid actually saying anything concrete. It’s so common I’ve come to callling it the “deflective tense.” I’m surprised to see the NYT adopting the practice, but there it is. I’m happy to learn that others notice this as well.

      To be perhaps overly fair, I do this a lot myself. I like “would seem” and “seem” as ways of projecting uncertainty and humility on my own part; they’re my way of saying “I have reasoned this through, and it seems right, but I am unsure enough about it in my own mind to qualify it in a way that invited response and correction if necessary.”

      Although I sometimes do it when I’m arguing with people and want to use an extra soft touch; it makes my statements less declarative. Strong declarative statements, I’ve found, tend to really get up peoples nose if they think they’re incorrect; people often have the same reaction to them as they do to outright lies, because in their eyes they are.

      • Karen24

        I use that construction in speaking often, for precisely the reason you state; I don’t want to be more confrontational than is absolutely required. We’re being polite and trying make things more pleasant in the world. The RW, by contrast, is tryng to deflect attention from their terrible positions.

        • Murc

          Yeah, intent does matter, doesn’t it?

          I hope this isn’t going to be another thing the nutjobs ruin.

    • Malaclypse

      My sincere condolences. That’s how my dad passed, and the week deciding was the worst week of my life.

      Be prepared for one thing – once you decide, there is a bureaucracy, and either you or your mom will be signing, over and over and fucking over, allowing these decisions to be enacted. I could not put my mom through that, and doing it was horrible and surreal.

      All you can do is try and do what is best for your dad. You don’t need to be perfect, you just need to know you did your best. And you’ll have done that.

      • Karen24

        He’s a lot better this morning. He’s more responsive and breathing on his own. The ugly point is going to be if he can’t swallow.

        • Malaclypse

          You and your family are in my thoughts.

          • Karen24

            Thanks. It really does help to hear these messages.

        • slothrop

          Sorry to hear about your problems. Same here. There is almost nothing “natural” about death in our culture given the commodification of dying bodies. In the example of my own father, his recovery resulted in a year-and-a-half imprisonment in a nursing home, in which his body was used by the nursing home to bankrupt my mother.

          • Karen24

            That is horrible. Also extremely common.

          • jim, some guy in iowa

            it was very strange to stand in the hallway outside the room where they were working desperately to bring my dad back and be relieved when they failed

          • BiloSagdiyev

            Thank you for using the word “imprisonment.” It’s not much different. I had a friend spend more than a year in a rehab facility that wasn’t much better. Luckily, she escaped, so to speak.

            And I also have a friend who bitterly views the medical industry as being something that transfers your estate to their pockets.

            • Karen24

              My mother has said more than once during this ordeal that she thinks they’re just trying to get more money out of her.

              And today, once more, the doctors have decided my dad isn’t in good enough shape to remove the breathing tube. He was all but dead Monday, improved enough to consider rehab Wednesday, alert and responsive this morning but not enough to get the damn tube out of his throat. I’m inclined to agree with my Mom.

              • Malaclypse

                Somewhere in the hospital there should be someone with a job title along the lines of “patient advocate.” If you haven’t already, find this person.

                Also remember that you have the right to see your father’s full file.

                Hope that helps.

                • Karen24

                  I’ve told mom to speak to those people, and don’t sign one damned thing before she has a chance to read it with her lawyer — that would be me — and finally don’t sign anything that says she agrees to pay for anything. And appeal every single charge as far as she can go with it. My advice is to be a complete and total pest.

      • Lurker

        I can understand this from cover-your-ass point, but I still wonder. If Karen’s father has left a directive requiring that no extraordinary measures are to be used, how can the medical personnel override this clear instruction? Isn’t it a clear violation of personal autonomy? Shouldn’t they be more liable to be sued for disregarding that Directive than for following it?

        I have written and filed a similar directive, with clear instruction that it should be followed with regard to withholding extraordinary measures even against the wishes of my family. I shudder at the thought that it could be disregarded this easily. In Finland, such directive carries legal effect and not following it might constitute a crime.

    • pseudalicious

      Karen, I’m so sorry.

      • elm

        Same here. I wish I had more to offer than my thoughts and prayers, but if you want those, I can definitely give them.

    • Origami Isopod

      Shit, I’m sorry. I hope your father continues to improve.

    • Linnaeus

      Let me echo the others here and say that I hope for the best for you and your father.

    • Lurker

      I have little to say but offer my condolences.

    • Karen24

      Thanks to all f you for the thoughts and prayers and condolences. That’s all anyone can do right now, and it means a lot to me to hear it.

    • Rob in CT

      Karen,

      I just want to add to the chorus of sympathy. I’m sorry you and your family are going through this.

      My family was lucky, in a way, that my father went more or less instantly, at home, from a heart attack. There was the “what if I [my mom] had been home at the time” line of thought that I did my best to shut down (and thankfully the doctors she spoke with did the same), but for the most part dealing with his passing was a matter of, well, dealing with his passing. There wasn’t any uncertainty or gut-wrenching decision making.

    • sibusisodan

      Please accept my condolences too, Karen. How awful.

    • ema

      Sorry to hear about your dad. Hopefully he will continue to improve and recover.

    • JR in WV

      I’m sorry for your father’s illness, and the decisions you may have to make soon.

      My mom had COPD from an unfortunate addiction to Pall Malls and died in 1997. Near her end, she passed out, and Dad called 911 and the EMTs took to the ER where she was resuscitated. We went up to see her that day, and several days after, while she was in the hospital.

      One morning a physical therapist was working with her in her hsopital room, and I was out in the hall. She looked over at me, and winked. As she neared death she shifted from agnostic to atheist.

      After she got home, she told Dad, if you can’t stand to be with me and do nothing, then go to the other end of the house and wait a while. Whatever you do, don’t call 911.

      A week or two later, Dad called me at 6 am. I was standing by the phone in the kitchen, somehow. She had died in his arms in their bedroom just a little while before.

      Dad died in 2004, also with COPD, caused by chemo for his leukemia, which he beat. I held his hand for two weeks while hospice helped us along. It was election day when he died, and then Bush was re-elected. Quite a day.

      My point is that you should probably let him go sooner rather than later. He’s never going to recover to a life worth living. I’m old now, 65 coming up before the new year. I’m trying to get used to it, being old. I think I can do it. I have no choice, really.

      None of us do. We do have a choice about how we go about it. I’ve done the forms, just as your Dad did.

      Don’t let it get you down, it is the cycle of life, after all.

  • Hogan

    “Pro-life violence”: let’s make it safe, legal, and rare.

    • Lee Rudolph

      But not so rare that the elite can’t get some when they need it!

  • Murc

    and protects all human life — from conception until natural death.

    Am I the only one who heard the dog whistle against assisted suicide here?

    Assisted suicide is one of the lesser-known bugaboos among the fundamentalist set, especially conservative Catholics who view it as legalized murder.

    I suppose it’s morally coherent. You don’t get to control when you give birth or when you leave this world, because agency is ungodly, am I right?

    • Karen24

      Oh, I got that one loud and clear. It’s not only assisted suicide, it’s refusing or disconnecting feeding tubes and ventilators, and refusing extraordinary life-saving measures. Granny doesn’t want to lie in a bed hooked up to a machine for years? Tough. God demands it of her.

      • More evidence that “pro-lifers” are about nothing more or less than controlling as many people as possible. “Natural death” is another meaningless term that they throw around because it sounds nice, I guess?

        But I assume that if Mr. French is ever seriously injured or develops cancer or starts to choke on the crap he spews, he’d want someone to stave off his “natural death.” And in that vein, their idea of “supporting all life” never runs to providing affordable health care, or a safe, clean environment, somehow.

        p.s. I hope your family will be all right.

        • Karen24

          Thanks. It’s been a roller coaster ride, which bodes to go on for awhile.

          Mom’s church has really stepped up. Their minister, Krista, has been over every day but Sunday and yesterday and when she can’t come other members have been here. They’ve got people collected mail and watching the house and watering plants. Know she’s got help and friends who are willing to take concrete action has been a huge help to her and to me.

          • Bruce B.

            Oh, good. That all makes a big, big difference.

        • DrDick

          If taken literally, the concept of “natural death” would actually prohibit any medical intervention to prevent it.

          • DAS

            But aren’t doctors a part of nature too?

            • BiloSagdiyev

              And if we have all this technology to keep the dying alive now, why did God hide it from the previous 1,9000 years of Christians? What a jerk.

            • ema

              Not to mention pregnant patients who are also part of human life in need of protection from the morbidity/mortality of carrying to term.

      • DAS

        Tough. God demands it of her.

        It’s because the so-called pro-life movement is essentially a death and suffering cult. I actually once asked a conservative Catholic about what he (and note the gender … although I am sure some Catholic women would say the same thing) would do if he were a woman with a pregnancy such that carrying the pregnancy to term would result in death of the mother(-to-be). He responded that “if it’s good enough for Jesus to die on the cross for all of our sins, it would be good enough for me to die so my baby could live”.

        If you have to suffer? Well tough beans … Jesus had to suffer worse than you. And if it’s good enough for Jesus, it’s good enough for you.

      • Lamont Cranston
      • joe from Lowell

        It’s not only assisted suicide, it’s refusing or disconnecting feeding tubes and ventilators, and refusing extraordinary life-saving measures.

        There’s actually split on that. The Catholic teaching about “natural death” treats extraordinary life-saving measures as optional. After all, they aren’t natural. You don’t have a duty to stay on the ventilator, or keep granny on it. You can let nature take its course.

        As we saw during the Schiavo episode, the fundamentalist evangelicals aren’t all on the same page.

        • Lurker

          Yeah. Unlike in many other cases, the official catholic position on palliative care is a sane one. However, the official catholic position is not universally accepted. There is a lot of cross-pollination between evangelical and catholic fundamentalists. Neither is going to be out-holied by the other. So, as evangelical fundamentalists are decrying responsible end-of-life care, there are numerous catholic fundies doing the same, even though all popes since Pius XII have been pro-palliative care. (In fact, the church doctrine on palliative care sounds and feels exactly like the scholastic moral ethics we have come to love and hate in the catholic church. In fact, it sounds a lot more catholic than their position on abortion, which is far too clear-cut to sound like proper catholic theology.)

          Personally, I have seen how difficult facing death can be for family members. I needed to confront my aunt on giving one more intravenous antibiotic to my dying grandfather. I told her that I would not do that even to my worst enemy. It took her a long time to get over it. I definitely was not too early. He died two days later, after my aunt ceased requesting for more intensive actions. Without them, he would have died two weeks earlier, with much less pain.

          From my physician father, I learned a proverb already as a child: Pneumonia is old man’s best friend. During the last year, I have seen the truth of it in several cases.

      • advocatethis

        It’s a rather selective opposition to disconnecting from feeding tubes and ventilators, though. The opposition seems to end at about the time the hospitals stop getting paid for it.

    • Origami Isopod

      There is also a fetishizing of suffering going on there. They consider it morally purifying. .. for lesser people. (Cf. Mother Teresa’s “clinics”)

      • BiloSagdiyev

        Yes. Which is part of the GOP being full of kinky S&M freaks.

  • DrDick

    Looking for coherence among the forced birthers (who are anything but “pro-life”) is a fool’s errand. They are nothing less than radical Christian extremists fostering terrorism, exactly like ISIL and the Taliban. They have actually committed more acts of terrorism in this country than anyone else.

    • Murc

      Looking for coherence among the forced birthers (who are anything but “pro-life”) is a fool’s errand.

      I’ve met a few. I’ve been friends for awhile with a very frustrating fellow who is pro-life, anti-death-penalty, anti-war, and an advocate of prenatal-to-grave health care as a fundamental human right.

      (He is one of the only people I will actually deign to refer to as “pro-life” rather than “anti-choice” or “forced birther.)

      They’re super rare, tho.

      • Robert M.

        Yeah. When I lived in Michigan I knew a Quaker who was like this.

      • Origami Isopod

        And they’re still wrong, even if they’re consistent.

      • joe from Lowell

        But what does it mean for this guy to be “pro-life?” Would he imprison doctors or women for the “crime” of abortion, or does he just give it a thumbs down?

        • Murc

          But what does it mean for this guy to be “pro-life?” Would he imprison doctors or women for the “crime” of abortion, or does he just give it a thumbs down?

          Yes, actually. Also opposes rape or incest exceptions, although he doesn’t think women should be forced to raise their rapists child or their son who is also their brother. He does think that the state should absolutely and fully provide for the child’s upbringing and education in those situations, as it should for all unwanted children.

          The only time he’s in favor of it is where the mother’s life is actually at risk, as (and bear in mind this is my representing his views as best I can) he views the responsibility as reciprocal; he doesn’t view an unborn child as having the “right” to kill their mother any more than the mother has the right to kill it, and if it’s a situation where one of them is almost certain to die anyway he’s okay with it not being the mother. (I know, how magnanimous of him, right?)

          To be more fair to him than his views perhaps warrant, he also thinks women for whom pregnancy would be life-threatening should have access to tubal ligations or any other kind of pregnancy-preventing health care they need, on demand, at zero cost, and anonymously. He also thinks sex education should be robust, wide-reaching, non-shame-based, and begin at an early age.

          The thing is, though, this guy is literally the fucking unicorn of pro-lifers. It’s like meeting an actual principled libertarian. Are they out there? Sure. But you have to go on a magical quest to locate their hidden sanctum.

          • BiloSagdiyev

            The thing is, though, this guy is literally the fucking unicorn of pro-lifers. It’s like meeting an actual principled libertarian. Are they out there? Sure. But you have to go on a magical quest to locate their hidden sanctum.

            And then they charge you $5 to come inside?

            • Rob in CT

              I came so close to spraying water all over my computer. SO CLOSE.

      • DAS

        The conservative Catholic I mentioned above is like this. He’s not necessarily anti-war or even an economic liberal (as he does believe that private and religious charities will do a better job at providing such things health care services to the needy than the government), but he’s anti-death penalty and willing to consider more socialist policies if they actually work better at making sure people have food, health care, etc.

        He also is pointed not involved in any way with the “pro-life” movement as the slut-shaming the movement regularly engages in really turns him off.

  • Robert M.

    I mean, French is wrong. But… not when he says “There is no coherent moral argument for pro-life violence.”

    You can absolutely found (some aspects of) your moral philosophy on the sanctity of all life, or even all things that have the capacity for life. You’d have to figure out how to draw some practical lines (you can’t avoid walking on grass seedlings you can’t see, every sperm clearly isn’t sacred, sometimes antibiotics are necessary, etc.) But I think there really is a coherent set of principles that leads simultaneously to the conclusions that abortion is wrong, and so is violence to prevent abortion.

    Obviously, your typical pro-life adherent isn’t doing this. You’d also have to be a vegetarian and a pacifist, and those are features… let’s say not particularly associated with the American political right.

    So my problem with French isn’t that bit. It’s everything else that goes along with it, notably that he’s publishing his bullshit mea-non-culpa in the National Review, and that he’s the one writing it.

    • Buckeye623

      Everything’s justified when “fighting them d* libtards.”

    • Dilan Esper

      Ross Douthat wrote a pretty good condemnation of pro-life violence a few days ago.

      But the thing is, it was really esoteric and philosophical. And that’s the problem here. If you are an ivory tower Catholic intellectual, sure, it is possible to argue “this is just like the Holocaust but we still shouldn’t use violence to stop it”. But ordinary people aren’t going to think that deeply about it. They are just going to hear that it is just like the Holocaust.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        Also, what stopped the Holocaust? It wasn’t pretty. And everybody knows, on some level, what we did to stop the Nazi regime. Violence. Industrial-scale violence.

        If we keep losing on this issue, we’re going to have to set up an underground railroad within this country, heck, we ride as well be setting up a ride network as it is, given the rural access problem. There will, at first, be free states and forced birth states. Except all the drug war liberties granted cops to be involved, asset forfeiture, cash, searches, etc., snooping, drones.

      • sharculese

        So… bog standard Douthat? The same blind, unthinking bigotry as the rest of them, just written by someone with a schooling and instinct to abstract it to a level where it sounds smart to people who don’t read books.

        • joe from Lowell

          Awesome statement by Camp Clinton two days ago:

          Now some Republican candidates are saying that Donald Trump’s latest comments have gone too far. But the truth is, many GOP candidates have also said extreme things about Muslims. Their language may be more veiled than Mr. Trump’s, but their ideas aren’t so different.

          • sharculese

            I remember reading a profile of Douthat when he got promoted to the NYT that spent a lot of time on how he agonized over how to talk about gay rights because he had gay friends and didn’t want to cause them pain, as if to indicate that we were getting a younger, breed of reactionary, a kinder and gentler one that was wiser to the ways of the world.

            And then he started writing columns and it became clear that he actually didn’t care about his friends, what he cared about was getting labeled as the homophobe he clearly is.

          • Rob in CT

            Giving them hell by telling the truth. Me likey.

  • Morbo

    This is a useful radicalization “roadmap.”

    1. Otherization: “I am from one group, they are from another. We are different and separate.”

    2. Collectivization: “They are all the same.”

    3. Oppression narrative: “They are oppressing us.”

    4. Collective guilt: “They are all complicit in oppressing us.”

    5. Supremacism narrative: “We are better than them.”

    6. Self-defence: “We have to retaliate against their aggression to defend ourselves.”

    7. Idea of violence: “Violence is the only way.”

    Substituting “the babies” for “us” a few times, it seems like all the way up to Step 5 is mainstream pro-life rhetoric. Step 6 is certainly prominent enough with Operation Rescue and the like as well. When someone takes it to Step 7, well that’s just a chance to hammer home Steps 3 and 4 some more.

    • JR in WV

      I have to point out that you can only substitute something for “us” in steps 3 and 4, which are the only two steps where the word “us” appears.

      So the rest of the list just doesn’t work for your suppositions.

      Not that I disagree with your point, just picking the nit.

      All the fundigelicals are responsible for the murders their members commit, even crazy Mr. Dear’s handiwork. The people who foment the hatred of Planned Parenthood should all be rounded up when there occurs a series of murders, and tried for their participation. And held until after the trial process is complete.

      Murder is murder, and the pro-life people are killing people, not imaginary future people. Imaginary future potential people can’t be murdered, they don’t exist yet…

  • MikeJake

    Have to tip my hat to Robert Dear and Trump for being so unequivocal. Watching the media spin its head 360 degrees and spit pea soup trying to report this has been grimly amusing.

  • keta

    Oh, fuck David French. “Pro-life violence is rare”? Sure it is, numbnuts. Tell that to the folks that endure this shit and tell me how this isn’t violence.

    I’m convinced the NRO editorial guidleines include the dictum: a word means whatever you want it to mean in any particular context.

  • Sly

    However, it won’t be rare after America decides that life begins at conception and ends at natural death?

    It will actually be more common, because such violence will be legitimized by law and carried out by agents of the state.

  • efgoldman

    “I’m guilty. There’s no trial,” the accused mass killer Robert L. Dear Jr. told a startled courtroom here on Wednesday. “I’m a warrior for the babies.”

    I saw the video clip of him ranting that. His picture should be next to “deranged” in the dictionary. He looked like one of the old “madness” portrayals in the silent movies.
    IANAL, and I have no idea how the law on criminal insanity reads in CO, but on first glance this guy sure looks like he qualifies.
    None of which brings the people back, of course.

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