Tag: filibuster

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Prospects For Redeeming Institutional Dysfunction

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In Uncategorized
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On January 4, 2010
At one of my wonkier venues, I have some thoughts about the issues that Matt and Ezra have also discussed recently. There’s no question that the combination of increased partisanship and institutional rules that assumed a substantial degree of bipartisan comity create a serious problem. I don’t see partisan polarization declining significantly (and nor do […]

An Easy Question

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On November 24, 2009

Ezra is, of course, completely right about the filibuster. While there may be individual exceptions in the long sweep of history, legislative gridlock is far more beneficial to reactionary than to pro

The Filibuster and the Constitution

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In Uncategorized
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On August 6, 2009
To make some comments on the conversation between Drum and Yglesias (and Hertzberg): The case for the constitutionality of the filibuster starts from a compelling basis: Article I specifies that “Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings.” Against this, Kevin makes an argument from structural inference: “The fact that certain types of legislation […]
With the discussion here and elsewhere in the blogosphere about the filibuster, I thought it was worth trying to get to the core of the issues. It is true, as djw and I have argued in detail, that the mere fact that the filibuster is “counter-majoritarian” does not make it a bad thing. But it’s […]

Veto Points and the Bailout

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On December 15, 2008

John Judis brings the appropriate level of outrage to the failure of the auto bailout. And I actually think Kevin Drum is being too charitable when he attributes Republican opposition to the bailout t

Marshall on the Filibuster

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On December 14, 2008

Via LP, Josh Marshall’s argument on why Senate Dems need to protect the filibuster is just a touch underspecified: It is just bad practice — especially in the face of the last eight years

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