Home / racist shitheads / What I tell you three times is true

What I tell you three times is true

Comments
/
/
/
339 Views

Donald Trump, in keeping with the finest traditions of the GOP, does minority outreach with both middle fingers raised.

“We’re going to rebuild our inner cities because our African American communities are absolutely in the worst shape they’ve ever been in before. Ever, ever, ever.”

[…]

“You take a look at the inner cities, you get no education, you get no jobs, you get shot walking down the street. They’re worse, I mean honestly, places like Afghanistan are safer than some of our inner cities,” Trump said Tuesday. “And I say to the African American communities and I think it’s resonating, because you see what’s happening with my poll numbers with African Americans. They’re going, like, high.”

It’s not the poll numbers that are high. But note how he masterfully (SWIDT?) assures his audience (which, forgive me, but I’m going to assume was predominantly white) that yes, those people are all safely confined tucked away urban hell holes and they really are savages who spend all of their time black-on-black criming one another.

I guess any African-Americans spotted outside of the inner city should be ignored as hallucinations or better yet, chased off because they don’t belong there!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • efgoldman

    I guess any African-Americans spotted outside of the inner city should be ignored as hallucinations or better yet, chased off shot by the cops because they don’t belong there!

    Fixed

    • ThrottleJockey

      I guess any African-Americans spotted outside of the inner city should be ignored as hallucinations or better yet, chased off because they don’t belong there!

      Oh come on as much as I despise the man if he didn’t mention inner cities you’d have a royal fit. And, also how much does Hill–or even Obama–mention upper class blacks? Let’s be intellectually honest here. The whole of the Democratic Party automatically assumes black people are poor inner city residents. How much policy have they proposed to help blacks by strengthening, for instance, anti discrimination laws?

      • carolannie

        Reality check time! The WHOLE DEMOCRATIC PARTY assumes this because you know, they voted for an educated black man who did not live in the inner city and appointed black people to various positions etc etc. Of course, you can see all the black people working for Donald Trump and speaking for him in his campaign because he went looking for them in the ghetto (thanks Elvis) and couldn’t find any that wanted to work on his campaign. It has to be the most lily white campaign in the world.

        OK< everyone else, this guy utters such drooling idiocy I had to vent.

        • jim, some guy in iowa

          the sad thing is, he really isn’t that stupid. he just acts like it on the internet

          • Thirtyish

            he really isn’t that stupid.

            People say this, but I have to say I haven’t seen the counter evidence.

          • DrS

            He’s either this stupid or a festering asshole.

            Wait, he could be both.

            • efgoldman

              I still have my doubts that he’s really black, really a Democrat, or really lives in the inner city.

              • postmodulator

                I have seen intelligent comments from TJ.

                I feel like he tends to go in streaks. He’ll be doing pretty well for a while and then out of nowhere you get “Lenny Kravitz’s cover of ‘American Woman’ was better than the original.”

                • brad

                  My impression is when he feels ganged up on because we don’t, for example, consider child abuse to be a common sense solution to one of life’s problems he just starts trolling. That’s when stuff like thinking OJ is probably a murderer makes you a white supremacist comes out.
                  But also, he lacks humility in the whole whatever the hell he decides to think is common sense and we’re just clueless white people presumption. He can’t see past the tip of his nose.
                  I’ll stop showing that his trolling annoys me now.

                • No, they’re a two-headed trollbot who will stop trolling long enough get a tolerant commentariat to take them seriously again.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  LMAO dude you have a helluva memory! If your ears were as good as your brain you’d recognize that Kravitz’ version was better :-)

                • witlesschum

                  LMAO dude you have a helluva memory! If your ears were as good as your brain you’d recognize that Kravitz’ version was better :-)

                  ’70s guitar sound always owns ’90s guitar sound. I don’t know why, but it’s true. For a 90s cover to be better, you have to radically change it like Smashing Pumpkins did with Dancing in the Moonlight. Kravitz sounded like a bad bar band on that one and Fly was an argument for him to stick to covers.

                  I’ll always stick up for Are You Gonna Go My Way? as a catchy as hell riff, but after that I don’t get why Kravitz wasn’t a one hit wonder.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  Because a lot of women thought he was hot as hell lol!!!

                • witlesschum

                  I think that’s necessary but not sufficient.

                  Kravitz is a ridiculously handsome dude, but so are a lot of guys hanging around the entertainment industry. Where’s Gerardo’s second hit?

                • postmodulator

                  ’70s guitar sound always owns ’90s guitar sound.

                  To expand on this, my favorite part about the Guess Who’s original recording was always the liquid-y, massively overdriven guitar tone of the lead lines. (About ten years ago you could buy a pedal that recreated that tone.) So Kravitz’s version loses massive points since this is the one thing he didn’t include in his version. In fact, everything about his cover is drier and raspier. Dry and raspy is okay for the Gang of Four or Nile Rodgers, but Kravitz apparently can’t make it work.

                • Manny Kant

                  To expand on this, my favorite part about the Guess Who’s original recording was always the liquid-y, massively overdriven guitar tone of the lead lines. (About ten years ago you could buy a pedal that recreated that tone.) So Kravitz’s version loses massive points since this is the one thing he didn’t include in his version.

                  Right – the lead, and the way it interacts with the riff, is the best part of the song. Kravitz’s version takes out the lead, so all you get is just the riff over and over again. It’s a solid riff, but you’ve lost half the joy of the song right from the start.

              • ThrottleJockey

                Of course you do white man.

        • ThrottleJockey

          Carol get a grip. Reality check indeed. If you don’t think Obama is from the inner city then you really don’t know Chicago and I can’t take seriously anything you have to say. Obama isn’t from the inner city? Are you kidding me???

          • Juicy_Joel

            If you don’t think Obama is from the inner city then you really don’t know Chicago and I can’t take seriously anything you have to say.

            I didn't know Punahou was in Chicago! Neat!

            • ThrottleJockey

              He was born in Hawaii but he was elected from the inner city.

              • DrS

                I see. That makes him somehow from the inner city?

                Goalposts. Whoosh. Etc.

                You’re a disgusting human being and a terrible person, TJ. You should rethink your life.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  She said the man did not live in the inner-city when he was elected and that is flat-out wrong–and ignorant of the both of you. You’re such a colossal ass you could make Eeyore jealous.

                • DrS

                  The goal posts shift yet again.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  Do you know how to read? There is no goal post moving. She said: “they voted for an educated black man who did not live in the inner city.”

                  With reading skills this poor I hope you’re not a MD.

          • Warren Terra

            Obama worked as a community organizer in a poor Black neighborhood (I don’t know a damned thing about whether it was “inner”), and presumably lived there while doing so. But: he didn’t grow up there, and he didn’t live there after law school.

            There’s also Michelle, whose Chicago roots are much deeper; I know nothing about the particular community she grew up in, though.

            In any case: you can make a very good case that Obama worked hard and got to know the struggles of the Black underclass. You can even say this was a defining part of his evolving personal identity, and an important part of how a half-African kid raised by White grandparents in Hawai`i connected to the American Black community. But you can hardly say he is “from the Black inner city”.

            • ThrottleJockey

              …they voted for an educated black man who did not live in the inner city.

              Ummm since he was my goddamned neighbor for a stretch I can testify that it was the inner city.

              Carol’s comment is so galling and offensive because she acts as if an educated, eloquent man can’t live in the inner city…Hell she epitomizes my point on the ignorance Of white liberals with respect to blacks….Some of the most dangerous streets in all Chicago are a short 5-10 minute drive from where Obama lives.

              • Also, A short ten minute drive from where Trump lives in Manhattan. Also a short drive from where Obama lives now.Cities, how do they work?

        • Origami Isopod

          I highly recommend installing Cleek’s Pie Filter and adding TJ to it. It makes reading LGM a lot more enjoyable.

          • Thirtyish

            Ah, but does it work on mobile devices?

            • Origami Isopod

              No idea.

      • (((Hogan)))

        How much policy have they proposed to help blacks by strengthening, for instance, anti discrimination laws?

        Does appointing Supreme Court justices who support affirmative action and the VRA count? Because that’s where most of the action is right now.

        • ThrottleJockey

          Not enough.

          VRA is an important issue but middle class and upper class blacks normally have the IDs, time, and savvy to navigate the added burdens. What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

          I’ve asked a large number of my friends this question each year since 2012. I’ve only had 1 offer up any policies at all.

          • MilitantlyAardvark

            It’s OK, Dinesh. You can use the words “Democratic plantation”.

          • ajay

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?
            I’ve asked a large number of my friends this question each year since 2012. I’ve only had 1 offer up any policies at all.

            OK, first of all, five is not a large number; second, those people are not your friends, they just happen to be on the same bus as you; and third, they are not struck dumb by your incisive political analysis, they are just keeping quiet and avoiding eye contact and hoping that they can get to work without any of your spittle actually landing on their jackets.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            How about making college more affordable?

            • ThrottleJockey

              That’s a good one but of recent vintage. Sanders pushing for this was the primary reason I supported him…I usually ask around election day. I’ll see how many name it.

              • Pat

                True, this was a big piece of Sanders’ policy slate. Remember all the sturm and drang before the conventions on putting together a Democratic policy platform that was inclusive of Sanders’ ideas?

                If we can elect enough Democrats, look for college affordability to be a big and early legislation drive.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  My fingers are crossed Pat, my fingers are crossed.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            How about better police training to stem the tide of cops shooting unarmed black people?

            • ThrottleJockey

              That’s a critical issue in the community now but I’m not sure that middle class blacks think of that as an issue for them directly as opposed too poorer blacks who face police more often. And we haven’t even seen any bills to accompany the campaign rhetoric….I’ll have to ask around. I’m genuinely curious how middle class folks think about it.

              • Pat

                Well, that’s why the woman puts out policy papers. Her strategy is to write out what they want to accomplish and let people see it and critique it.

                Remember when Clinton met with BLM and asked them for policy ideas on how to stem police violence? Given that her basis for support in the primaries was the African American community, you can bet good money that she will try to implement whatever they give her.

              • Howlin Wolfe

                TJ, I think many middle class blacks have the same fear of police that poorer blacks do. I’ve read too many testimonials from such people to not think the fear is prevalent among middle-class blacks. I’d like to see some actual polling about it. But I can’t accept your blithe assertion. Also, cops don’t means test their victims, and middle class blacks must know this from personal experience. If you are a middle class black, I would think that crosses your mind.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  Hey Wolfe, it was less than an assertion. Its an open question as far as I’m concerned, though my ‘hunch’ is that middle class blacks don’t feel like they have as much to fear from cops as poorer blacks do.

                  I’ve been arrested–multiple times–by racist cops, but even then I never feared I’d be injured, much less killed, because I was taught by my father how to deal with cops. “Hi, how are you officer?” “Yes sir.” “No sir.” Most middle class black men I know are the same. When cops pull over my barber and ask him why he’s out late at night he says he shopping for BBQ, lol. They buy it hook, line and sinker.

                  Hell I have a friend who used to deal drugs. He got pulled over at 5am one morning. He had a broken tail light. He told the cop that he’d been working 2 jobs at the Waffle House and MickeyDs and hadn’t had time to get it fixed. The cop said fine, but hurry up and do it. Had the cop looked carefully at my friend’s back seat he would’ve seen a pound of weed, plastic bags, and a scale. But he bought my friend’s lie. Most cops want an excuse–even a flimsy fig leaf–to unleash violence. Most black middle class men know how to avoid that. Lot of poorer cats who didn’t have a father to give them that lecture don’t know that. And that’s the truth.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            Wait, wasn’t there something on background checks to keep maniacs and killers from buying guns?

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            I’m pretty sure Clinton has a policy paper out on creating middle class jobs. You could check out the section where they talk about strategies to address racial disparities in hiring.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            I’m not a middle-class African American, but I’m really happy with the free long-term birth control we got for our teen-aged daughter. She’s really happy with it too.

            • ThrottleJockey

              That could be a good one. I haven’t seen that voiced yet but only two of my friends are parents to teens… Blacks in general favor high social spending but middle class blacks rarely think of themselves as the recipients of the benefit. We tend to support it because it’s good for relatives, friends, community and because we feel an obligation to help others.

              • Pat

                We had talked with all our kids about birth control and sexual responsibility, like pretty much all parents do. But I’m telling you that long-term birth control is really different and can have a huge effect on teen girls. It evens out her hormonal swings and helps her focus on how she feels and what she wants. She’s been more confident, more assertive, and showing more ambition in the year since she got her implant. She really believes that her parents trust her to be in charge of her life.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  I imagine she does. I’m happy its worked out so well for you guys. I have some Latina friends who are quite excited. They’re mothers to pre-teens though, so its a tad early yet for their daughters.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            I’m guessing that TJ’s completely unaware of the recent NIH/NSF push to improve diversity in the STEM fields by promoting summer jobs and other training for kids from under-represented groups, including AA and Native Americans.

            • so-in-so

              If one of TJ’s three cousins or other “friends” hasn’t seen the policy and told him about, TJ is probably unaware.

              • Pat

                I know about it because it’s one of the things I do for work. I’m not surprised that a lot of people are unaware of it.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  Do you know what’s going on with the Colorado bill on this? I know they had a really successful pilot funded by a private donor, but had heard the GOP state reps were trying to block public funding of it.

                • Pat

                  I think you mis-replied here – were you asking about the Colorado initiative to provide long-term birth control at no cost to whoever asked for it? That was a wildly successful program at reducing abortions and unwanted pregnancies. That was why the Republicans in Colorado killed the program.

                  Which is exactly what the Republicans will do to the national requirement that insurance companies pay for long-term birth control, if you freak out and vote third party.

                  Republicans want women to be afraid of sex. It’s stupid, but it’s real. If you vote third party, you can enable the Republican return to power.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            I think there was something called the “Affordable Care Act” that can really help people get affordable health insurance. It also has sections to help disparate care for minorities, which is something that was ignored in a lot of previous progressive legislation.

            • ThrottleJockey

              I imagine most people are unaware of the racial disparity provisions or yet see a difference in impact.

              • Pat

                This is a slow change thing. The push in medical training is to treat the whole person, not individual crises, and there’s a lot of new training for medical personnel to help them overcome implicit bias.

                It’s not something that’s easily seen, unless you work at a hospital and see all the emails on implicit bias training. You and your friends might experience it as, “Oh my god, that doctor finally listened to me!” Or, if your health care provider is behind the curve, it may still be a while. But the push is there, and they’ll know where to focus energy in the coming years by looking at hospital outcomes.

                Unless Trump gets elected, of course.

              • jim, some guy in iowa

                and this is why you have such a reputation for being disingenuous and why (some/many) people think you straight-out troll. You asked a question (what have the democrats done?), got an answer that doesn’t fit your premise that the dems did nothing, and handwave it away on the notion that since people aren’t fully aware of the racial disparity provisions they don’t count as action by the democrats. And then you preen about “intellectual honesty”

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            Higher minimum wages will help everybody, including the middle class, by driving up wages in general to living standards.

            Trust me when I say that no Republican will ever support you personally earning more money, TJ. But the Democrats will fight for higher wages. If we elect enough of them.

          • witlesschum

            Unions. That’s the best way for black people to become middle class and it’s the best way to insure their children stay middle class. Especially public sector ones.

            In general, I think it’s kind of a category error of a question to ask. It’s like when Republicans say Democrats don’t have any policies for poor whites. You have to put the horse before the cart and argue that some specific problems are uniquely of such and such group and require unique solutions.

            • ThrottleJockey

              In general, I think it’s kind of a category error of a question to ask.

              Yep. I hear ya. I ask it in that way for a particular reason. I ask that question in response to the statement I hear from various people that the Dems care about blacks. My response is that Dems don’t so much care about blacks as the GOP actively hates blacks.

              Obama’s first bill was the Lilly Ledbetter Act, and act I support. That bill was marketed by Dems as a bill to help women. IANAL so the bill may in fact apply to racial/ethnic minorities as well, but the Dem Party has done very little these last 2 decades to push bills specifically for blacks as the Dems did for women with the Lilly Ledbetter Act and with VAWA. I support both of those bills, and I wish they’d come up with bills that are likewise specifically targeted for racial & ethnic minorities. I want to see a more inclusive Democratic Party.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            Isn’t it Cory Booker, Democrat from New Jersey, who’s been trying to address the issue of over-criminalization and sentencing disparity?

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            I seem to remember that it’s President Obama is working on a systematic way to implement pardons that will try to help all prisoners convicted under the same unfair rules rather than just do it one at a time.

            He’s a Democrat.

            • so-in-so

              Let’s just link (again) to the Life of Brian “What have the Romans done for us” skit and be done.

              • Pat

                But this is important! People look over the latest headlines, get dejected, and start thinking, “Why the hell should we support the Democrats anyway?” And here are just a few answers, off the top of my head, where Democrats and Democratic policy are clearly a better choice that has made a difference in peoples’ lives.

                Don’t give in to the psychological gaslighting games. We Democrats have better ideas and we have made enormous strides towards a better society. It ain’t perfect, but it’s definitely better.

                • so-in-so

                  I agree, although I expect TJ to be back in a couple weeks saying “what have the Democrats done?”. Leaving aside the snark, thanks for taking the time to post so many things, top-of-your-head or not.

            • ThrottleJockey

              He is. That *may* be something that middle class blacks think is targeted toward them directly. Unfortunately its drastically behind schedule.

              Ironically, Virginia’s Terry McAuliffe has been the stand up guy on this.

          • Pat

            What policies have Democrats proposed to help middle class blacks? Anything?

            And my favorite thing that the Democrats did was to nominate and elect a black man for the Presidency in 2008 and 2012. That had a huge impact on a lot of middle class African American kids. It showed them the reality that hard work and smarts really can take you very far.

            • ThrottleJockey

              The happiest day of my political life.

      • The Two-headed Trollbot calling for any sort of honesty is the 4th funniest thing on the internet right now.

        • ThrottleJockey

          Intellectual honesty and you have an awkward relationship I know.

          • LOL, that’s funny coming from you. An “I know you are, but what am I?” is something else.

            • DrS

              TJ really is special, ain’t he?

        • N__B

          the 4th funniest thing on the internet right now.

          The Brangelina reaction tweets are number one, but what are two and three?

      • efgoldman

        if he didn’t mention inner cities you’d have a royal fit.

        Asserting facts not in evidence. I really don’t give a shit one way or the other what Orange Litlescrotum says, because the default is, every word out of his mouth is a lie.

        The whole of the Democratic Party automatically assumes black people are poor inner city residents. How much policy have they proposed to help blacks by strengthening, for instance, anti discrimination laws?

        Factually untrue and unprovable. Just for example, who tried to introduce legislation to reinstate the VRA after Shelby County? Spoiler: It wasn’t the Republiklowns.

        • LosGatosCA

          I have biracial relatives who spend the majority of their time in schools that get the highest rating possible and in a house that appraises well in excess of $1M. Of course, they live in a county where the median price for a SFR is $900K.

          But that’s just in my immediate family so my data may be skewed.

        • ThrottleJockey

          You’re kidding me right? That’s one of the standard quadrennial attacks on the Republicans. What are doing for inner cities? But when when the clowns mention the inner cities you jump all over him. Make up your mind already.

          VRA supports are important but they’re not primarily for middle class and upper class blacks who generally Jane the wherewithal and savvy to navigate the new Jim Crow laws.

          • DrS

            Jfc, more apologia for the GOP from TJ.

            Quelle suprise,

            • ThrottleJockey

              Where the hell do I apologize for Trump? I flat out despise the man.

              I also despise intellectual dishonesty. You can’t lament the fact that the GOP ignores the inner city and then attack them for talking about inner city problems. You want to complain about the fact that Trump said that the inner city is like Afghanistan? Well hells bells Spike Lee made a whole movie comparing Chicago to Iraq and Kanye made a song about it.

              Name a single time–just once–when this blog has addressed the issues of upper class blacks. Most of what I hear from commenters here is that upper class blacks have the same privileges as upper class whites. That’s the socialist critique for you.

              • (((Malaclypse)))

                You can’t lament the fact that the GOP ignores the inner city and then attack them for talking about inner city problems.

                Not even when what they say can be reasonably summarized by “exterminate the brutes”?

                • ThrottleJockey

                  That’s an intellectually honest and defensible argument Mal…Totally different than Shakes’ contrived criticisms. When Colin Powell and Joe Scarborough call you an unalloyed racist…well that says it all.

              • witlesschum

                Everything Trump does is worse because he’s Trump. That’s the honest truth. He’s just complete garbage in a way that George W. Bush is not and everything out of his mouth is 11 times more offensive, even if it’s just “Chris, get me a number 4.”

                To say that upper class blacks have the privileges as upper class whites would be as stupid as arguing that poor whites lack privilege in the same way as poor blacks. Not something that’s going to get a universal amen at Jacobin, much less LGM. And your evidence for that proposition is what, basically one roundly-reviled Campos post?

                • ThrottleJockey

                  Hey Chum. What I found striking about the reaction to that Campos post was that so many people attacked him for, as I saw it, accurately reflecting the median LGM commenter’s views on race vs class. Paul made the same argument that had been made countless times before, he just turned the argument in a direction that people here disliked.

                  How many times have my arguments that famous black men–Bill Cosby, Jameis Winston, Nat Parker–face racial prejudice been met with howls of derision that their fame and income immunize them from prejudice? Brad, Brett, Stalker-ish, Loomis, etc, it goes on. So many times that I can’t begin to count.

                  Paul’s mistake was to take those arguments as genuine instead of the transparently dishonest rhetoric it was. He drank too much of the Kool Aid. I disagreed with Paul’s post because I recognize that blacks face prejudice and discrimination at every income level. But at least among some commenters here that’s Politically Incorrect. And that’s why intellectual dishonesty is one of my biggest pet peeves. Don’t make one argument today in a different argument tomorrow just because the political context has changed.

                • witlesschum

                  I can only answer that, again, I don’t think you accurately perceive the median commenter’s views. Or at least not mine, though I don’t really think I represent consensus around here.

                  I didn’t and don’t see the contradiction between thinking Cosby/Winston/(I don’t recall who Nat Parker is/was) certainly face racial prejudice, but also thinking they committed sexual assaults they were accused of because the evidence was strong that they did. Strong to the point of ridiculousness in Cosby’s case.

                • ThrottleJockey

                  You’ve been honest, pointed and straightforward in your critique. There are others who have been as well, such as Denverite and Murc just to name a couple. I don’t think you guys represent the median LGM commenter though. You don’t seem to do political posturing and that’s important to me.

              • (((Hogan)))

                Most of what I hear from commenters here is that upper class blacks have the same privileges as upper class whites.

                Got links for that?

                • TJ is reporting what he hears. All that links could do would be report what “commenters here” actually say.

                • ColBatGuano

                  His cousin told him.

          • Howlin Wolfe

            Is it too subtle for you to realize that Trump’s “outreach” is totally disingenuous? You keep coming back to your thread-disrupting BS question as if this matters not. Whether or not we’d “have a fit” if Deadbeat Donnie didn’t “mention the inner cities” is irrelevant to what the substance of what he’s saying about the inner cities. So your “question” is really a non-sequitur in an bad argument. Let it go or be rightfully deemed a goddam troll.

      • socraticsilence

        Um….every single time Obama talks about his wife and daughter.

      • so-in-so

        Does that include the black people actually in the Democratic party? Obviously Trump assumes that all black people live in the inner city in slums based on his comments, but the cites that the Democrats assume the same thing are missing.

      • Barry_D

        “Oh come on as much as I despise the man if he didn’t mention inner cities you’d have a royal fit. ”

        Riiiiiiiiiiiigggggghhhhhht.

      • Drexciya

        Oh come on as much as I despise the man if he didn’t mention inner cities you’d have a royal fit. And, also how much does Hill–or even Obama–mention upper class blacks? Let’s be intellectually honest here. The whole of the Democratic Party automatically assumes black people are poor inner city residents. How much policy have they proposed to help blacks by strengthening, for instance, anti discrimination laws?

        TJ, there is no democratic or Democratic room for the enactment of decisively or structurally responsive pro-black policy. If your expectation is between that and nothing, you’re always going to get nothing outside of the moments where, as it did with Obama, the possibility of representation punctures the structural reality. The country is made for white people and bipartisan responsiveness to their needs, as they articulate them, comes first and often only.

        But, and this is important, there’s a lot of room for the enactment and protection of incidentally pro-black policy, or policy that betters the standing of existing black people while we try to get our due. The Medicaid expansion (which can be used to access breast and cervical cancer screenings and birth control at Planned Parenthoods, which Democrats also support), the appointment of pro-Affirmative Action/Civil Rights judges, a Department of Justice that’s responsive—as Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder before her were—to fluctuations in access to voting rights (and the impact of voter suppression), increase and support of increases in the minimum wage, the protection and expansion of reproductive rights, the possible reversal of egregious SCOTUS rulings, The Fair Sentencing Act (which Hillary wants to expand to remove all racial discrepancies in sentencing, while applying it retroactively), and lip service toward broader decarceration etc are all things that black people benefit from and need. And regardless of how little practical effect such gestures have, even DOJ investigations into police departments yield information that sharpens ambient arguments and acts as an impetus for further organizing. Tactical multiplicity, not absolution, has been the organizing approach of black politics since before it was legal for us to organize.

        We don’t just strive to get what we need, we strive to get and keep what we can, where we can, on all fronts, simultaneously. You’re not obliged to be a participant or even supporter of all of those fronts, but consider this: there’s activist work pushing for policy that might yield the conditions for structurally responsive black policy. The Obama era, which has served as a reminder of black people’s civic/economic fragility and devaluation, has also been an incubator for some of the strongest, most visible and radical civil rights work in a generation. Do you think that would have been similarly possible without a responsible government illustrating the limits of responsibility? Do you think that would have been similarly possible if those organizers weren’t part of a demographic that the party in power is strategically obliged to be responsive to? Do you think that would be possible if, as it would be under Republican governance, the protection of our most basic rights stood as our best case recourse? I think not.

        Don’t think about just individual people or just short term politics. Think about the political conditions present and future activists will need to work under. Think about the conditions that would be best able to see the successful fulfillment of their political goals. Think about the protection of the essentials that the struggling and impoverished need to get by. Think about the conditions necessary to see the expansion of programs and policy that addresses those needs. And remember that writing in your mother does less than nothing in defense of or in support of any of these goals.

  • DrDick

    There is lame, there is pathetic, and then there is Republican minority outreach.

    • Thirtyish

      There is disingenuous, there is condescending, and then there is Republican minority outreach.

    • Warren Terra

      Nothing will ever top the Virginia Republicans scheduling George “Macaca” Allen, he of the noose tastefully decorating his office, to speak at a Minority Outreach rally

    • witlesschum

      And then there’s Rand Paul lecturing at Howard.

      I still can’t get over how hilarious and illustrative that was. I realize, no one has thought about Rand Paul much recently, but still.

  • (((Hogan)))

    He outreached to them with symbols, he outreached to them with hair,
    He pursued them with dorks who can’t cope,
    He threatened their lives with a racial scare,
    He harmed them with bile and with rope.

    • Vance Maverick

      Snarky!

  • Karen24

    I think among Trump’s supporters, getting fewer African-American votes than George Freakin’ Wallace IS a good result.

    • LosGatosCA

      The badge of anti-PC courage from the not so growed up Hitler Trumpen Youth.

      Blacks, Mooslims, weak women just need the tough love, I.e. Hate, he shares out of concern for their welfare.

  • jim, some guy in iowa

    he reads a poem- song lyrics, really- about a snake taken in by a woman who then bites her once it heals to the crowd at his rallies. The snake is allegedly a stand-in for immigrants and the woman for the US. Trump’s take is 180 degrees to the writers’ intent according to his daughter who was interviewed on ‘as it happens’

    • Warren Terra

      The daughter is also miffed that when introducing the poem Trump often attributes it not to its author but to the recording artist who made it famous. But then that’s probably just how Trump’s mind works, it’s basically how he thinks business should be done, and be rewarded.

  • LosGatosCA

    I think this post reveals who the real racist is.

    I’m going to assume was predominately white

    Talk about reverse discrimination – insinuating that only white people would attend a Trump minority outreach rally. Even if true, doesn’t that prove that Trump supporters are very broad minded and concerned about minorities and the hellholes they live in surrounded by criminals who prey on them until The Colorblind Summary-Justice-Dispensing Police can exterminate them during routine traffic stops.

    • I can’t tell if that is snark.

      • Howlin Wolfe

        Me either.

      • Cash & Cable

        My snarkometer is at 97%.

        • LosGatosCA

          100%

  • LosGatosCA

    Slightly OT – Even the elites are starting to think the world has gone straight to fucking hell

    I feel like we’re living in times like those when the library at Alexandria was burned.

    • Harkov311

      This “everything sucks” mentality just runs me the wrong way so much. Everything sucks compared to when? Compared to what? Saying it sucks now kind of implies it was better at some past stage. I have a hard time believing that the world was a better place to be during, say, the Cold War, or during the 1910s before World War I.

      • bender

        In both of those periods the world was better in some respects and worse in others. Obviously also how better or worse it would have been depended on who you were and where you lived.

      • witlesschum

        This. Everyone who wants to advance grand theories of history and trends like these is either silly or a fraud.

      • addicted44

        Thank you.

        Things could (and should) be a lot better. Doesn’t change the fact that if you were to be randomly born as any child in the world, you would choose to be born today over any other period in human history.

      • McAllen

        Everything sucks compared to when?

        2012?

        Look, on the one hand, I get what you’re saying here. On the other hand, I don’t think it’s ahistorical to be worried about the rise of the far-right, or global warming.

        • so-in-so

          Both those things were happening in 2012, we are just noticing more now.

          • McAllen

            Both are also stronger now than they were in 2012, and both have the potential to make the world a much, much worse place to live.

        • Origami Isopod

          Yes – the issue of climate change is a valid reason to think things have gotten worse and will continue to worsen. Everything else, though, is ahistorical.

          • McAllen

            I think it’s reasonable to worry, at least, that Trump and the far-right movement he’s leading are going to make things much worse.

            • so-in-so

              Except that the push-back against the rebel flag changes, the up-tick (or at least, our noticing it) in police shootings of people of color, Dylan roof, etc all preceded or coincided with the beginning of Trump’s campaign. It’s also a mistake to assume Trump is a unique cause of the rise of alt-Right proto-Fascist racism rather than him floating to the surface because the alt-Right via Briebart and Fox were already rising and he was therefore enabled. A most, he quickened the pace.

              I think the same is true of climate change – it was there, we weren’t doing much about it then or since so the fact we notice it more now doesn’t mean it’s “worse”.

              • McAllen

                Trump didn’t start the far-right movement, but he’s the culmination of it, the closest the far-right has come to gaining formal power.

                I don’t disagree that that the current time is the best is history, to be clear. But it’s easy to see how close we are to things being much, much worse, and I don’t think it’s wrong to be concerned.

                • rhino

                  Trump is not far-right. He is riding them for a chance at power, but the man appears to have few, if any, political convictions.

                  I have considerable doubt that, even if elected, Trump would promote far right causes or legislation. The man would merely feather his own nest, while betraying everyone who voted for or against him.

                  Fortunately I believe we will never learn the truth, even the American voter is not stupid enough to make so big a mistake.

                • so-in-so

                  Yeah, he has no convictions other than helping himself, but that doesn’t mean he wouldn’t be useful to the far-right since he would probably find it easier to continue using them than to switch horses. Plus, yes, he seems more comfortable with their ideas, since he spontaneously re-tweets them from time to time.

  • CP

    “What I tell you three times is true.”

    I wish Trump would say “Bloody Mary” three times in front of a mirror with the lights out.

    (I know, I know. “What did Bloody Mary ever do to you,” right?)

    • Ever, ever, ever.”

      A few weeks back, an Architect of Record on a project for which I am the Design Architect included the following emphasis in a wide-reply email to the development team:

      “I never saw that! Never, ever, ever!”

      I was amazed that he felt that to be appropriate in a business email. I find it not-surprising that Trump finds it to be compelling campaign rhetoric….

      • LosGatosCA

        Not all caps?

        That shows a little maturity on his part.

        Anyway, aren’t architects famous for their petulance and/or disconnect from normal human issues.

        I read a letter Frank Lloyd Wright wrote to one of his customers in Grand Rapids who had the audacity to ask for his help in keeping their house from leaking at the roof seams, as they separated due to the cantilevered overhangs – basically – it’s an honor to live in a house I designed so STFU. Reading the letter 70 years after the house was built while being inside it, he wasn’t wrong.

        I also once worked with an industrial architect who came up with a very nice color scheme for our manufacturing area. The problem was it would be a maintenance nightmare due to the number of colors in the pattern and the use of a very thin line in the middle that wouldn’t even be visible at 25 feet and further away (in 125×200 spaces). So we suggested simplifying the pattern and eliminating the pesky line. I should also say that to work every round column within the space would repeat the pattern on the wall.

        The suggestions were clearly an outrage so the designer picked up the 3D model, complete with columns, silently -yet loudly – exited the meeting and left the building in a huff.

        The profit from billing on that portion of the work was undoubtedly greater than my annual salary at that point. And we loved the concept – but not enough. It all ended well but our immediate reaction was simple confusion, as in what just happened? which led to disbelief No- that didn’t really happen to ultimately, well we can paint it any damn way we want.

        • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

          My FIL is an architect – apparently “…and the roof leaks” is a common joke to tack onto any discussion of a renowned building.

          • LosGatosCA

            In this case it was actually a family residence and the letter written by the husband/wife was asking for real help on the leaks,

            Not sure how famous it was until Steelcase bought it and restored it. At that point it was a jewel – I expect that they added some steel beams to support the roof and eliminate the sagging.

            The virtual tour is here – the pictures don’t do it justice in the least. The gold quartz in the fireplace has to be seen in person to be appreciated.

            http://meyermayhouse.steelcase.com/the-meyer-may-house-restoration/

            • JustRuss

              Wright’s most famous residence, Falling Water, also leaked profusely, and was also eventually retrofitted with steel reinforcement to strengthen the concrete decks.

              The cherry on this irony sundae is that it was built for a steel magnate, who fought with Wright to get more steel incorporated into the original structure. They ended up compromising, but it wasn’t enough to keep the structure from sagging.

              • All structures sag. I mean, unless you’re doing a steel pole building.

                My office is in a building constructed in 1858. For Milwaukee, that is pretty much as old as anything gets; older than that, it burned, fell over THEN sank into the swamp. It is half block from the Milwaukee River, and in the flats that the Menomonee Indians used to grow rice before the French trappers came through. So the subsurface is muck. The building was built as exterior masonry wall on spread cribbed timber footings, with a column line down the middle on cribbed timbers with timber friction pilings beneath. I recognize that this will only mean anything to a couple of you, but suffice to say this was not ‘engineered’ in the modern sense of the term. Basically, the exterior walls were on squishy foundations, while the columns were on stiffer sorts. So the entire exterior wall system slid down about 8 inches, while the columns did not. So there is a noticeable hump in the middle of the building. Because of this, everybody has figured since about the beginning of WW2, that the thing was going to fall down.

                However, the thing about old buildings, is that they move and shift. And if they are no longer moving, they are mostly OK; with the caveat that the movement has not created something severe.

                So we dug down to figure out whether there were rot problems on the wood footings; the excavations filled with water and the few drills we put into the cribbing showed greenwood. No rot.

                In the case of our building, the cracks and heaved plaster has been repaired and skinned and in the last fifteen years or so, no new cracks have showed up.

                • N__B

                  All structures sag.

                  True, but FLW royally screwed up the cantilevers at Fallingwater. Had he listened to what he was told* the amount of deflection would have been far smaller.

                  *HAH!

                • LosGatosCA

                  Pretty remarkable.

                  My sister owns a couple of storefronts in the East Bay that +probably+ predate WWI, no firm records support the exact date of construction.

                  As she was replacing the partially rotted, completely worn floor they realized two things – no foundation on one side of the building – it was essentially resting against the building next door and all the floor supports were just placed directly in the ground.

                  Really just one big tremblor on the Hayward fault and it would have been kindling. Now it’s a great space for artists, etc.

                  ETA – because she brought the foundation, walls, electrical, etc. all up to current code.

              • My house was built in 1904. It has required structural rebuilding of a foundation wall and repair of several structural elements as well, including a pantry converted to a powder room and a bathroom with a violated floor structure.

                It wasn’t designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, but it still benefitted by having a licensed architect working on these items…

              • sibusisodan

                Wright’s most famous residence, Falling Water, also leaked profusely,

                With that name, I’d be surprised it if didn’t…

          • Warren Terra

            My (lay) understanding is that some of Gehry’s more outre designs are a real challenge to build and a bigger challenge to make work, because of these sorts of issues.

            • I have a great picture of a Libeskind gallery in Toronto, that has a rope barrier and a Home Depot bucket at the obvious leak point.

              Having said that, and I am not kind toward Gehry’s work after his house, but his addition and remodeling of the Toronto Museum of art is, to my eye, sublime.

            • Origami Isopod

              Gehry’s buildings at MIT are a prime example of this. (They’re also fug, but that’s just my opinion.)

          • FLLW, who was a spectacular egoistic asshole that only exceeds Trump in that he has actual talent, liked to say when his clients complained about leaks; “that’s how you know it’s a roof”

            • LosGatosCA

              True enough. But what talent he had. I’ve never made it to SC Johnson or Falling Water. But I’ve been to Taliesin West, the Guggenheim, Meyer May, and the Hanna House.

              Unusually, I learned about Louis Sullivan first and then Frank Lloyd Wright. So, it didn’t surprise me when I learned that Wright always referred to Sullivan as the Master. From Wright that’s off the charts respect.

              In any case, their work stands up. Visionaries with exceptional talent.

          • Woodrowfan

            the architect version of “the Aristocrats!”?

        • no, not all caps. Although the dude sometimes did that. But more exclamation points than I showed….

        • Anyway, aren’t architects famous for their petulance and/or disconnect from normal human issues.

          Only in the stories most worthy of telling at parties or online. Myself, I started my career by de-railing a ranting boss by asking him how long I had to wait while he yelled at us, before I could start working to fix a problem. Since then, I mostly work to fix a problem first; after that, affixing blame is not only maybe less severe, but also largely defused. And, at the end, the clients generally remember who worked to deflect blame and who worked to fix the problem.

          But then, I am not a starchitect. I do what I do, and do my best at it. Sometimes, we do something kind of great. But most times, I want to have a happy client.

  • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

    When he gets, like, 4% of the A-A vote, can someone please ask him “was that about what you expected”?

    • LosGatosCA

      That”s infinitely better than he’s polling now, so no, that will EXCEED his expectations ginormously

      • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

        Oh sure – Trump’s being outpolled by Stein, and Stein’s being outpolled by most varieties of milk.

    • Having four AA voters is not the same as 4%. Of course, Trump does not understand that. And if he says it, his drones will shout it over and over again, like the Thousand Guitar Army.

  • efgoldman

    Colbert’s opening monologue just eviscerated Skittles Junior.

    • grouchomarxist

      Hopefully this was preparatory to having Mini-Trump stuffed and mounted. After all, turnabout is fair play ….

      • MilitantlyAardvark

        What gets to me about The Little Cockwork Orange That Couldn’t is that he keeps insulting his family by marriage and sister in the most despicable way with his anti-Semitic gibberings. If Ivanka had a grain of self-respect, she’d be first in line to bitch-slap the loathsome little toad into the middle of next week.

        • Humpty-Dumpty

          I simply do not understand the family dynamic at work here, beyond a vague suspicion that there’s something more horrifying than even I can imagine in the mix.

          • NonyNony

            They may be the closest thing we have to American royalty.

            And by that I mean actual royalty. The kind that tended to be infested with syphilis and had all kinds of crazy running through the family tree. Not the fantasy version of royalty that royalists like to pretend was the norm.

            • so-in-so

              No love for the Bush family?

              The Kennedys are too obvious and really didn’t work out well, but they are still trying, if halfheartedly, for a Bush dynasty.

  • Spiny

    “We’re going to rebuild our inner cities because our African American communities are absolutely in the worst shape they’ve ever been in before. Ever, ever, ever.”

    That is, even by Trump Standards, a hell of a thing to say. It’s not as flashy as his routine asinine bullshit, but it has that special combination of ignorance of the present-day plus a soupcon of historical obliviousness that makes it mouth diarrhea for the ages.

    • efgoldman

      it has that special combination of ignorance of the present-day plus a soupcon of historical obliviousness that makes it mouth diarrhea for the ages.

      Plus it has the added benefit of being totally untrue.
      Unless what he means is “we’re going to gentrify the inner cities so that the poor working people can’t afford to live there any more.” I could believe that’s his intention, so some front company could buy up all the real estate with borrowed Russian money.

      Maybe that’s why TJ gives Captain Combover credit for even mentioning it. He’s hoping to make a killing.

      • ThrottleJockey

        Yeah me and my millions are going to make a mint once Il Douche gets elected…

    • FlipYrWhig

      Trump seems to think the country has been one big Death Wish for 40 consecutive years, and that he’s Charles Bronson.

  • BiloSagdiyev

    New York City! Just like i pictured it! Talking yams, ‘n everything.

  • Of course, missing in his speech is any acknowledgment of Republican policies that have made things as desperate as they are. You know, because those blacks are desperate because they’re black, and they need whitey to help them out.

    • efgoldman

      missing in his speech is any acknowledgment of Republican policies that have made things as desperate as they are.

      But TJ wants to give him credit for even uttering the magic incantation “inner city” – like the RWNJ Republiklowns say Obama isn’t doing anything about ISIS because he won’t say the magick words “radical Islamic terrorism”

  • they need whitey to help them out

    of town, sight, and maybe even this vale of tears!

  • kped

    It’s quite interesting seeing a shift in the media. CNN was ripping this, even Don “Maybe angels took the airplane. Or a black hole” Lemon was ripping Trump for this.

    A good one from CNN yesterday was Anderson Cooper openly mocking Corey Liewendisky for trying to say that it was true that this is the worst time ever for black people. “But if that’s not true, why are their protests?”. Cooper replied that that argument would be laughed out of a first year college class. Corey’s response was something about Al Sharpton and protests. It was hilarious.

    (every conservatives know 5 black people – MLK Jr, Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Obama, and their black friend who agrees with them that blacks are scary).

    • postmodulator

      As I’ve said before, if they’re really bigoted, they not only know who Sharpton is but they’ve memorized every detail of the Tawana Brawley case.

    • TribalistMeathead

      You mean Don “Obviously, there’s the smell of marijuana in the air” Lemon.

    • John F

      and their black friend who agrees with them that blacks are scary

      Blacks are scary, whites are scary too, as are Asians and Hispanics… people are scary, young males of any race religion or creed are downright terrifying.

      If your bar is that some people are scary you might as well stay home and never leave bed.

      • kped

        Very true. And as a white person, you are more likely to be the victim of another white person if a crime is committed against you. Always here about black on black crime, but white on white crime, or hispanic on hispanic, or asian on asian, are all at nearly the same level…because people commit crimes against people they live around and know…so it makes more sense to be afraid of people who look like you!

  • witlesschum

    That fact that several unrelated posts mention ThrottleJockey’s provocations isn’t really a good look. To the extent that he’s trolling, it’s working on some of you. Seriously, why does his version of being contrary bother people so? I guess I appreciate the variety, even when I think he’s wrong.

    I still miss Joe, too.

    • Cheerful

      Agreed. And I also miss Joe. When he disagreed he did so cogently and courteously.

      • witlesschum

        Cogently, at least.

        • kped

          …well, cogently sometimes at least…not sure I was persuaded by all of his stuff, which often veered into “no, that’s not what i was saying even though it is, what I am saying is thiiiiis”

          • twbb

            His tortuous defense of Bernie got…tortuous.

It is main inner container footer text