Home / General / Saturday Night Open Thread

Saturday Night Open Thread

Comments
/
/
/
151 Views

I had a red eye last night with the dreaded Chicago layover, meaning that sleep was even more disrupted than normal. I got nothing. Except for this.

It takes a lot to make me viscerally disgusted at this point in my life. But that’ll do.

Talk about whatever you want.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • Sly

    KILL IT KILL IT KILL IT

    • sparks

      Erik could try doing his worst and he’ll fail miserably. I’ve got a nice French bread and a hunk of very good cheese.

    • NBarnes

      I say we take off and nuke the entire site from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.

  • Chetsky

    Somebody needs to throw themselves on this hand grenade and make it, eat (some of) it, tell us all how it really tastes. I refuse to accept theoretical judgments!

    • Honoré De Ballsack

      They didn’t post the actual recipe (given that it’s the 1970s, it probably IS pretty unpalatable)–but I suspect it’s basically an aspic with mayonnaise in it, which isn’t that weird and could actually be quite tasty if made by a decent cook:

      http://www.cooks.com/recipe/6m9m005s/shrimp-aspic.html

      • ExpatChad

        Substitute good ketchup for the tomato soup!

        • Honoré De Ballsack

          Ha ha. The tomato soup turned me off a bit…I think if I were to try making it, I’d use cream-of-mushroom. I’m actually getting kind of curious about this.

      • StellaB

        In the 60s my great-grandmother made tomato aspic for fancy parties. It was tasty.

  • N__B

    “creamy”

    Am I the only who thinks that’s a tell in food descriptions?

    • Judas Peckerwood

      Not just food descriptions.

      • Vance Maverick

        Military orders and heraldry too.

  • science_goy

    Why? Why was this a thing?!

    • Ruviana

      Forget it science_goy, it was the 70s.

      • science_goy

        And I thank my lucky stars that I was too young to remember any of it. Though occasionally I do feel a strange, primal urge to put on some Steely Dan.

        • howard

          to pick up on my comment on clothes below, science_goy, are you kidding me? sure mainstream culture was “naff” (to use the brit-punk term) but my god was the underground fun in those days….

          • science_goy

            I think the underground is always fun if you can find it.

            • howard

              and that’s almost certainly true, which is why i try to stay away from dissing decades: you can feel confident that someone, somewhere, is having outrageous fun.

              since i’m already violating the “don’t call me late to dinner” behavioral norm, though, i’ll hold for another time the fascinating question of whether there was something especially outrageous at work in the pre-aids, pre-widespread awareness of the dangers of the pills, powder, drink lifestyle or whether each generation finds its own way to express dionysus and they are all equally special if you’re part of them.

              • science_goy

                I suspect the latter. My “underground years” were 1990s Pacific NW and southern CA. Wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world. The kids today are probably having fun in their own way, but they better stay off my lawn.

                I’d also argue that mainstream culture in some decades is more ridiculous than others (the “better” mainstream cultures IMO being where the underground breaks through, like in the 60s). But your point about not dissing decades is well taken.

      • CrunchyFrog

        For some reason I was trying to explain the 70s – mostly regarding clothing – to my 16 year old daughter today. I admit that when it came to “Why?” all I had was “I dunno”.

        Of course, this was after the 60s when kitchen appliance colors were either barf yellow (almond) or barf green (barf green), counter tops were formica, and walls were covered with vertical fake wood “paneling”. I blame all of it on lead poisoning.

        • sparks

          Ahem, “barf green” was known as avocado.

          • And “almond” was known as Harvest Gold.

            Kids these days…

            • efgoldman

              And “almond” was known as Harvest Gold.

              Didn’t the (slightly more palatable) copper-colored appliances start in the 70s, too?

          • CrunchyFrog

            Oh right – I was trying to remember the official name ….

          • PohranicniStraze

            My grandfather always referred to that particular hue as “gan green”, a joke that went way over my head until much later.

        • howard

          yes, but the ’70s was also the time when the cover of the first ramones record guaranteed that i was going to continue to wear jeans and t-shirts pretty much…forever.

          as a side note, i’ve recently been reading jon savage’s original interviews for “england’s dreaming,” the england’s dreaming tapes, and it’s stunning the extent to which all of the first generation brit punks – your steve jones, your jon lydon, your jordan, your viv albertine, even (amazingly) your sid vicious – not to mention their managers/conceptualizers malcom mclaren, viviene westwood, and bernie rhoades – were obsessed with fashion, to the finest details (and, of course, hated mainstream british clothing styles of 1974-75 (“flares!” they all moan).

          edit: here’s the link: https://www.amazon.com/Englands-Dreaming-Tapes-Jon-Savage-ebook/dp/0571209319/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1471744214&sr=8-5&keywords=jon+savage

          • CrunchyFrog

            I would never say the 70s was all bad. Or even that the music was all bad – a lot of it was good. But it was an … unconventional … decade. Sideburns. Maxi skirts in reaction to miniskirts. (There is a reason that syndicated reruns of Charles Angles and Love Boat always result in far lower ratings than expected.) Slit skirts as the compromise. Actual shorts for guys (actually, that’s an example that’s weird in the present day – why do girls wear shorts and guys wear full-length pants and call them shorts?). Bell bottoms. No, not pant legs with a bit of flare at the ends – I mean hoop skirts at the bottom of each leg. For guys.

            • bender

              I like formica counter tops. They are easier to maintain than the stone and glass counter tops that the upper middle class currently demands. They are way easier to maintain than tile counter tops. They are better looking than stainless steel. If you don’t use them for cutting boards or set hot pots on them, they last a long time.

            • bender

              You left out the first attempts at business suits for women. Boy were they awful.

            • efgoldman

              No, not pant legs with a bit of flare at the ends – I mean hoop skirts at the bottom of each leg. For guys.

              You left out double knit fabrics, which for a while you could get in any color as long as it was brown.

              • N__B

                Don’t make me say “qiana.” You’ll regret it.

        • steverinoCT

          I saw a guy with a huge afro and yes, an afro pick stuck in it, just last month. Platform shoes. The now-ubiquitous tie-dye. For bell-bottoms I’m just waiting on cooler weather (eagerly– I am about sick of folks squeezed into pre-ripped skinny jeans). The cycle continues.

          Of course I was a kid in the 70’s, so jeans/t-shirt/Chuck Taylors were standard for me regardless. And I’m a techie now, and get by on khakis/polos/sneakers year-round.

          • CrunchyFrog

            Tie-dye. You know, it’s been making an off-and-on comeback for a long time now, maybe since the early 2000s when the peace symbol was rediscovered in response to Bush’s Iraq hard-on.

            Speaking of … after the Iraq war started I sent what was probably my last batch of Xmas cards (remember those?). Being a train nut I had a cache of Xmas cards with steam locomotives on them, but I intentionally bought a set of standard issue very Xtian religious Xmas cards with the single word “Peace” on the front and sent them to my Xmas card list. Many of my friends had revealed themselves to be unconditional mongers of war against dark skinned people, and all of them were Xtians, so I loved triggering the cognitive dissonance. And they, of course, knew I was doing it.

          • vic rattlehead

            Jeans/t-shirt/Chucks seem pretty timeless to me. I’m a “millenial” and that’s what I wear 90% of the time when I’m not at work or do something where I have to bare minimum throw on a polo shirt.

        • bender

          I like formica counter tops. They are easier to maintain than the stone and glass counter tops that the upper middle class currently demands. They are way easier to maintain than tile counter tops. They are better looking than stainless steel. If you don’t use them for cutting boards or set hot pots on them, they last a long time.

          • Pseudonym

            Personally I just don’t want to deal with the ants.

            • wjts

              That’s how you get ants!

      • Ask Me Gently

        I suppose it doesn’t matter, but from my memory of extended family picnics when I was a little feller and from the graphics of the ad, I would say that “salad” is more of a late 50s/early 60s thing.

    • “Don’t tell your friends and family you use recipes when you cook! And ingredients! They’ll despise you!”

  • It’s a hundred goddamn degrees in Portland and I’m going to a goddamn bbq where I am going to have to sit in the goddamn out of doors instead of in my current preferred habitat, a walk-in freezer.

    Goddamn!

    Also I’m starting a new job on the 1st. Last day at my old job was yesterday. So I get a brief respite.

    • Judas Peckerwood

      Enjoy your vacay. The forecast says that it will be almost 20 degrees cooler tomorrow, and the rest of the week is supposed to be much more bearable temp-wise

    • wjts

      I had a shift with a new-hire today. Very nearly the first thing he said to me was something like, “I don’t understand why it’s somehow a bad thing to compliment a woman on what she’s wearing”. The next 45 minutes were extremely tedious and included digressions on why he also doesn’t understand why fat women wear nice shoes and should expect commentary if they’re “falling all out of their shirts”.

      • Vance Maverick

        Is it your responsibility to set him straight?

        • wjts

          No, but he’s one of those people who are apparently incapable of not talking. So my choices were to let him talk his bullshit at me until he got bored and moved on to another subject or try to push back. The “best” part is that he’s convinced himself that he’s hilarious, so I got to hear “jokes” about how the woman at the sandwich place “appreciates his sexism”.

      • TribalistMeathead

        Mrs. Meathead works as the social worker for a local suburb and recently had a client, located somewhere on the autism spectrum, who couldn’t understand why a woman wouldn’t find it flattering to be told she’s attractive enough to be a porn star.

    • Pseudonym

      Ooh, what’s the new job? Can you tell?

      • Nothing too different than what I was doing before. I started my previous job when it was a little startup and worked there for six years, and in the interim it went from a seven-employee startup to a 70-employee business unit of a multinational corporation. My job duties transitioned more and more from “write code” to “have meetings to figure out what code other people will write.” Over the last year or so I’ve been increasingly depressed. I realized a while back it was largely due to feeling like I wasn’t doing anything useful at work. So now I’m going to work at another startup, where I can work as hard as I want and always be doing something of value.

  • Ruviana

    This from someone that likes mayonnaise on their french fries?

    • I love mayo. But mayo is a condiment, not a primary ingredient. Especially the core ingredient of a salad.

      • Try blue cheese dressing on the fries.

      • Peterr

        I think the recipe left out Wonder bread with the crusts cut off.

      • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

        Exactly. Mayo is the greatest condiment known to mankind. But it is not intended to be the main course.

      • Pseudonym

        Tomato ketchup may be a useless condiment, but it is not actively disgusting the way mayonnaise is. Delete your account.

    • Davis X. Machina
    • JMP

      Mayonnaise is simply the most disgusting alleged food known to humanity.

      • (((Malaclypse)))

        This.

      • ExpatChad

        Ever tried Poi?

        • los
          • Pseudonym

            Durian is actually somewhat tasty if you don’t smell it.

            • sparks

              Hard to do when it’s stuck under your nose.

        • JMP

          All I know about poi is that it’s one of those words that crossword puzzle makers just love; it’s very popular in that world where people refer to margarine as “oleo” and America’s biggest actress is Rae Dong Chong.

          • Judas Peckerwood

            it’s very popular in that world where people refer to margarine as “oleo” and America’s biggest actress is Rae Dong Chong.

            Whoa! If Rae DAWN Chong has slipped to #2 it’s news to all of us here in the outer Marshall Islands.

          • wjts

            This is the first time I’ve ever used the word “etui” outside of solving a crossword.

      • advocatethis

        My wife and daughter agree with you. I actually like it, so I get double delight from eating a spoonful of it out of the jar in front of them.

        • los

          and that spoonful of mayo helps the live koi/carp go down

          • catclub

            I was thinking of a poi-koi aspic.

            • It won’t go over with hoi polloi.

            • wjts

              I hate Poi-Koi Aspic, but I’m really not the target audience for an album of King Crimson songs arranged for ukuleles and traditional Japanese instruments.

      • science_goy

        Potted Meat Food Product gets my vote.

        • skate

          Liverwurst.

          My dad and a sister apparently loved it. The rest got the hell out of the kitchen when mom was packing sandwiches for them. Must have grossed the hell out of everyone in the school lunchroom when my sister opened up her sack lunch.

          • los

            Liverwurst.
            Must have grossed the hell out of everyone in the school lunchroom when my sister opened up her s
            ick lunch.

            bullies. vampires. mothra. But not dick cheeney.

        • los

          Potted Meat Food
          Audrey

      • sharculese

        It’s a garbage food. One of the happiest days of my life was when I learned that you can improve anything that calls for mayonnaise by subbing in chilled coconut milk.

        • DrS

          This sounds likes a real game changer. Looking forward to trying this.

      • Snuff curry

        It makes for very crispy grilled cheeses (the sandwich, not a slice of feta or whatever). It’s not fun smearing it on, though, and it’s absolutely vile to think about in any context, but it works really well.

        • efgoldman

          Was all of this copy pasted from 1… 2… 3… 4… however many times ago.
          Y’all be good or I’ll search out the 50s cookbooks again.

        • I don’t understand the visceral aversion people have to mayonnaise. It’s eggs, oil, and vinegar (or another acid) blended together. These are all completely unobjectionable, widely consumed foods any adult should be familiar with. Other than some sort of vegan aversion to eggs, I can’t see the issue. In any case, there’s virtually perfect vegan mayonnaise at this point (Just Mayo, for instance).

          • los

            Bland. Mayo seems to be mostly salt (as is the “flavor” of a lot of off the shelf food).

          • Snuff curry

            It’s not an entirely rational phobia, perhaps, but it carries with it, for some people, so much cultural baggage. The way Californians are thought to put cheese, bacon, avocado, and/or “BBQ” chicken on every little thing–we don’t and I blame Ed LaDou for most of this–mayo feels like a staple of bland white American cookery* no matter its origins. If used it as a creamy component for paella and the like, and from scratch, it’d appear more like, as you say, an emulsion and less like dairy mixed with coagulated ejaculate. And yet I have no problem being served it in appropriate quantities, provided someone else apply it to my food and in private.

            *being a bland white American (but not a WASP, thank the lard), I can vividly recall from childhood distant cousins dipping spoons into big jars of the stuff and eating it like actual pudding. It was truly disturbing to witness and it made me long for a successful Red Dawn scenario.

            • JMP

              As someone who moved to California a few years ago, yes Californians do in fact put avocado on fucking everything. Avocado, a vegetable normally used to make guacamole and that’s it, on every single sandwich including even hamburgers and in every salad it’s just on every single damn thing.

              • los

                mmm, rrrr.
                Cooked avocado tastes a bit rancid…
                Even the “watery” Indies avocado are OK “raw”.

                Avocados are meant to be eaten like most other fruits – just straight.
                Also, the thin skinned mexican avocados aren’t worth peeling. The peel has a slight “laurel” flavor…

              • If I had access to avocado in the quality and quantity that they’re available in California, hell yes I would be eating them all the time.

                You don’t need to put it on everything, though. Just split it and salt it and eat it with a spoon. The perfect food.

          • Pseudonym

            Pizza is delicious. Ice cream is delicious. They are both completely unobjectionable, widely consumed foods any adult should be familiar with.

            • efgoldman

              Pizza is delicious. Ice cream is delicious.

              But the latter should never be spread in the firmer.

            • Yes, and if someone put a scoop of ice cream on a piece of pizza I would probably not want to eat it, but I also wouldn’t go into the spasms of retching revulsion that so many people affect whenever mayonnaise is around. There’s nothing disgusting or unwholesome in mayonnaise.

          • Dalai Rasta

            My (entirely rational) aversion to mayonnaise comes from a lifetime of “dressed” po-boys purchased in SE Louisiana. The average quantity of mayo applied to a sandwich around here exceeds the optimal, I think.

      • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

        What does a mayo hater put on a sandwich? Seems like it would be to dry to choke down without. And mayo is just eggs and vegetable oil – pretty inoffensive as ingredients go.

        • (((Malaclypse)))

          What does a mayo hater put on a sandwich?

          Spicy brown mustard, usually.

        • vic rattlehead

          Yeah sure eggs and vegetable oil are fine. The former I love virtually every permutation of, the latter I use pretty regularly. Together they make a disgusting white shart.

          And what does a mayo hater put on his/her sandwiches? Mustard, fool! One of the few indulgences I allow myself. I have maybe five different mustards in my fridge. Not that yellow French’s bullshit though.

          Seriously, next time you make a ham and cheese try using only mustard instead of mayo. Good mustard. It’ll elevate that shit. If I’m using roast beef I’ll spread horseradish on instead. Fuck mayonnaise.

          • Mustard is good, but it’s a poor substitute for mayonnaise. For one thing, it can easily overpower the flavor of the sandwich’s actual toppings. For another, it doesn’t have anywhere near the lubricating power of mayo — pretty much nothing does. Third, a sandwich made with just mustard is prone to getting soggy due to lacking the lipid coating mayo provides the bread.

          • los

            at least horseradish is a vegetable
            but so is Jim Hoft…

          • Thom

            Hummus with roasted peppers. I dislike both mayonnaise and mustard (though use the latter in salad dressing) so hummus is my answer.

        • wjts

          Depends on the sandwich. Oil and vinegar for Italian subs, sometimes A-1 or HP Brown Sauce for roast beef, butter for ham. Sriracha can be good. And plenty of sandwiches taste just fine with no condiments at all.

          • efgoldman

            butter for ham.

            Augh! Yick!
            Bad enough mrs efg puts mayo on roast beef or ham. She didn’t grow up with real delis, so I can excuse that. Mayo goes on poultry (chicken or turkey). But butter on ham is the worst of all “cuisines”.

            • los

              butter is mostly salt “flavored”, though conveniently oily for sauteeing

              • Butter is butter-flavored. You mentioned above that mayonnaise is salt-flavored too, but to me the vinegar is a much stronger component. My dad is like that — he thinks everything is salty and that every packaged food tastes like nothing but salt.

            • wjts

              Nope. The jambon-beurre sandwich is the great French contribution to world cuisine.

          • los

            plenty of sandwiches taste just fine with no condiments at all.
            peanut butter.
            also unsweetened yogurt as sandwich filler.

            salsa or marinara “sandwich” doesn’t need contents. (whole wheat or similar)

        • JMP

          Vinegar and oil, that’s always the best thing for a good cold sandwich.

        • bender

          A little bit of plain yogurt, or some vinaigrette.

        • econoclast

          We just choke it down joylessly. Like men.

        • Pseudonym

          Oil and vinegar, spicy mustard, aioli.

          • Aioli is mayonnaise. Oil and vinegar is mayonnaise without the emulsifier of eggs.

        • What does a mayo hater mix with their canned tuna?

          How do they make Russian dressing?

      • tsam

        Coconut is the correct answer, actually. No mayo for tsam. Deathly allergic to eggs.

      • los

        “boiled dressing” has more flavor, but more salt “per serving” than mayo.
        I don’t know where the tradeoff lands..

      • Real mayonnaise, made from egg yolks and olive oil, is delicious and bad for you. You can buy an approximation in the chilled fresh food section in French supermarkets. Big Food “mayonnaise” that keeps for ever is a contemptible fraud.

  • N__B

    Karma rules!

  • synykyl

    How about following that with a piece of ketchup cake for dessert?

    • Yet another reason that Canada needs to be invaded and eradicated.

      • (((Malaclypse)))

        There’s just no way that place is real.

        • jim, some guy in iowa

          ah but Gord Downie would beg to differ

    • Judas Peckerwood

      How could they make a ketchup cake and leave out the mayo? Disgusting.

    • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

      this show-stopping cake tastes as good as it looks

      Well, it kind of looks horrible, so at least they are being up-front about things.

      • Dalai Rasta

        It looks like a red velvet cake, so I don’t know what the problem is visually, though it would be quite the horrifying surprise to actually eat the bloody thing.

  • CrunchyFrog

    Remember the Kansas City water slide decapitation? I know, hard to remember as it happened 13 years days ago.

    Turns out that one of the other fun features of hard right GOP state legislation is ridiculously low limits on compensation for killing a person due to negligence. The costs to the water slide company will be on the order of a few hundred thousand.

    Great business climate. And if you are a GOP state representative, they’ll give you all kinds of kickbacks including free passes to the water park for your kids as a thanks for the complete lack of any kind of oversight or consequences. Be interesting to see if the death of this child of a GOP state representative generates enough empathy to put cracks in the ALEC wall of legislation. Somehow I suspect it won’t.

    • howard

      I took a quick look and I’m only doing this on a phone so no hot link, but Kansas has been showing net out migration at least since 2010.

      • CrunchyFrog

        A lot – maybe all – of that is due to the collapse of Sprint. First, massive mismanagement by overpaid and overseveranced execs led to massive job losses in the KC area, primarily Overland Park. And for every Sprint job lost there were 3-5 jobs lost of local suppliers. Then the Softbank (Japan) purchase of Sprint really put the hammer down. The Japanese execs took one look around KC and decided to move all key operations either to Seattle or to the remnants of the Nextel HQ offices still present in northern Virginia. I know many Sprint suppliers – including a current and a former employer – who saw the staff in their KC-area offices slashed to virtually nothing from hundreds in just a few years.

        Still, there is a reason why no high-tech international firm wants to locate in KC. And its similar to the reason that Colorado Springs lost all of its high tech in the early 2000s after a brief flirtation with many firms. A local community culture dominated by predominantly white dumbshits makes it extremely hard to attract and retain high tech talent. As we’ve tried to explain to the Colo Springs leaders many times, if they want to rely on non-profit fundamentalist religious jobs and military jobs go ahead, but if you want to attract high tech you need a lot more than a few bike trails.

        • Peterr

          This has nothing — NOTHING — to do with Sprint. Most of the job cuts for Sprint related to the Softbank purchase were outside the KC area. Yes, OP took a hit, but nothing like the closing of call centers elsewhere in the US.

          The outmigration of jobs has much more to do with longstanding Kansas GOP efforts to make Kansas a “business friendly” state. The laws putting limits on damages were passed under a GOP governor well before Brownback, but with the same “pass this and they will come” mindset that undergirds the grand “experiment” of cutting taxes expecting a big increase in businesses relocating. And neither the tort reform nor tax cuts did what was promised. Businesses took their profits and raised executive pay and/or dividends. They did NOT increase their hiring.

          The latest evidence of this mess is the annual report from the KS dept of education on teacher retention. Compared with four years ago, huge percentages of teachers are either retiring, leaving the profession, or moving out of state to take teaching jobs elsewhere (the KC area MO schools have put up billboards in KS that helped attract teachers). When the GOP in Topeka vilifies your profession and cuts the resources given to schools to allow you to do your job, what do you think is going to happen?

          Still, the refrain goes up from Topeka: “No one could have anticipated . . .”

          • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

            Hey, as we learned in another thread, those teachers can all be replaced with Ken Burns videos.

          • CrunchyFrog

            Nothing to do with Sprint? I can see saying Sprint was only a part of it, but NOTHING? I can’t find reliable numbers on line, but I’ve heard that they went from roughly 30k down to not much more than 10k employees the last 10 years. And when you take away that many primary jobs you’ll be taking away several times that in secondary jobs – direct suppliers then all of the normal infrastructure needed to support that many people.

            As for Softbank, I know directly of several major programs that were stopped and replaced with work done outside of the KC area, so it can’t have been NOTHING.

        • los

          A local community culture dominated by predominantly white dumbshits makes it extremely hard to attract and retain high tech talent.

          well at least there’s Wississippi
          well at least there’s Kississippi

    • efgoldman

      The costs to the water slide company will be on the order of a few hundred thousand.

      Actually, it won’t, unless they choose to pay by themselves instead of letting their insurance do it.

    • vic rattlehead

      Ah yes but under compensation of victims is a small price to pay to save us from the horrors of Trial Lawyers, the Single Greatest Threat to Freedom and Low Taxes DUNDUNDUN!

  • CrunchyFrog

    Note to the commenter known as Just_Dropping_By: Please go back to my reply to your snotty-toned comment on the American Genocide thread. Here’s the link to your comment with my response below:

    http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2016/08/american-genocide/comment-page-1#comment-2158827

    As you will learn, PSAs today are PSAs-in-name-only compared to the system that once existed, and still exists in most of the western world. There once was a time when they had to meet certain standards, gain certification, and then were essentially guaranteed broadcast rotation – and not only during “dead” hours in the middle of the night. Since the Reagan era the broadcasters basically do whatever they want with regard to PSAs, so they no longer provide the public service they once did. If your organization has enough funds and can beg and plead and adjust your message to match the political beliefs of the broadcaster and maybe even pay them off then, yes, you might get a PSA actually aired!!!!

  • howard

    As a former regular red-eye flyer, I sympathize: changing planes at 5 a.m. after a 4- hour flight sucks.

    • wjts

      I once took a train trip from D.C. to Chicago which involved a multi-hour layover in Philadelphia in the wee hours of the morning. I was the only person in the station other than the security guards, who took turns informing me that I was not allowed to sleep in the station, never mind the fact that it was three in the morning, I had nowhere else to go, and my train wouldn’t leave for another three or four hours.

      • What? Hmm. This is 30th?

        I’m surprised that they cared given that you had a ticket.

    • vic rattlehead

      I actually love red eyes. I have terrible sleep hygiene at home but on flights, no matter how short, I get so bored and am easily lulled to sleep by the sounds of the engine.

      • wjts

        This is why my preferred means of going from Pittsburgh to Chicago is by Amtrak: the train leaves at midnight and arrives at 9:00 A.M.

  • Disgusting!

    If it weren’t for the Zip Code I’d think that ad was from the 1950s. Bet “BOX FC-4” means the ad was in an April issue of Family Circle.

  • JL
  • Red eye flight? Chicago layover? Welcome to my world.

    • CrunchyFrog

      They do put you up in a hotel, though, don’t they?

      • Yes, usually a pretty nice one.

        • efgoldman

          Yes, usually a pretty nice one.

          In compensation, though, you usually can’t drink, right?

          Also what’s with these children in the cockpits of the small jets (Embraers, usually) on the former spur airlines between PVD and DCA?
          [Hitches fresh onion to belt]

          • CrunchyFrog

            I honestly don’t understand that. Those “regional jets” are run by outsourced companies and pay as little as $24k/year for a pilot. A *PILOT*. How do they get anyone to do that kind of job for that kind of money, given the training involved? Or is it just an unofficial “residence” kind of job, like doctors have to go through, before they get a real salary for one of the majors?

            • Pseudonym

              Some people enjoy flying. Others are probably following the same path as in Campos’s law school posts.

            • elm

              I’m sure Kong can answer this better than me, but while regional airlines don’t pay a lot, that 24k/year (or less) is somewhat misleading. First, that’s starting salary which goes up each year of experience. Second, that doesn’t include a number of perks, like per diems and flight pay. (I honestly don’t know about the latter for regionals. I know the big airlines pay the crew extra for every hour in the air but I don’t know if the same is true for the regionals.) Third, a lot of the young ones are in the National Guard or Reserve and are seeing their pay supplemented from them while a lot of the older ones are receiving military pensions.

              And, yes, I think that the idea is that you put your time in at the low pay regionals and eventually get hired by one of the majors or FedEx. My understanding is that this doesn’t happen quickly or for anywhere close to everyone (like with residences for doctors) and you can get stuck for decades flying regionals for fairly low pay.

              • First year pay is low everywhere.

                Second year and later pay at the regionals still isn’t great. A First Officer at a regional might make $30-$40.

                If you can upgrade to Captain the pay isn’t too bad. At the 15 year point a regional Captain might break the $100K barrier.

                A lot depends on how the industry is doing. Right now people are getting hired left and right by the majors. A few years ago nobody was hiring.

                Since everything is based on seniority, you have to wait for someone to retire (or go out on a medical) before you can move up.

                When I got hired at Packages R Us back in 2005 they told us “You’ll all be Captains in 3 years”. Then we had the perfect storm of: replacing our 3-person cockpits with 2-person cockpits, the 2008 recession and the retirement age being raised from 60 to 65.

                I’m now in my 12th year with the company and I can finally hold Captain if I want it. Right now I prefer to stay senior as a First Officer and get the trips I want every month.

          • The rule on drinking is “eight hours bottle to throttle”.

            Since I fly nights, I don’t usually drink when I’m on a trip because I would have to do it around noon to be legal. At that point I’m usually just crawling out of bed and craving coffee.

    • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

      Is being a commercial pilot often really just “glorified trucking” as it’s sometimes portrayed?

      • los

        Is being a commercial pilot often really just “glorified trucking” as it’s sometimes portrayed?
        I’ve read SEEN that the hitchhikers are a little different.

      • CrunchyFrog

        Of course not, in practice. Whereas driving a semi truck is a lot more complicated than a car, piloting a plane is maybe 10,000 times more complicated than driving a semi. You don’t get the phenomenal safety record we’ve had with air travel the past couple decades without extremely skilled and trained pilots.

        But, in perception, well there’s that famous quote: “Twenty-five years ago, we were a step below astronauts. Now we’re a step above bus drivers. And the bus drivers have a better pension.” Well, in truth bus drivers no longer have pensions either, but otherwise the fact that air travel is so routine has taken the mystique out of the pilot profession – unfairly so, in my eyes as a frequent flyer.

      • It can be pretty boring at times, but I like boring. Excitement is usually bad in this line of work.

        We’re affected by the weather much more than a trucker. They can at least pull off to the side of the road.

        We operate under a tremendous degree of scrutiny, both by the company and the FAA. I have to pass a physical every six months and a check-ride in the simulator every nine months.

        The reason flying is so routine these days is that we go to a lot of effort to make it routine.

  • wjts

    Some radio links that might appeal to some of the folks here: an adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s Night Watch and the first in a series of Raymond Chandler adaptations.

    • jim, some guy in iowa

      thanks. BBC should do Chandler justice

      • wjts

        Some of the accents are a little weird, though nothing quite on the level of their adaptation of “The Shadow Over Innsmouth” where Zadok Allen sounded like he was from South Carolina. (To say nothing of the inexplicable decision to pronounce “Innsmouth” as “Inns-mouth” rather than “Inns-muth”.)

  • calling all toasters

    In unrelated news, Jill Stein’s running mate is a conspiracy nut with just a taste of Putin sock puppetry thrown in.

    Not a dime’s worth of difference!

    • efgoldman

      Jill Stein’s running mate is a conspiracy nut

      Of course he is. What else could he possibly be?

    • asifis

      The sloppy little Daily Beast article you linked to wasn’t very convincing.

      • It’s not convincing that he was on a Holocaust denier’s radio show talking about “false flags”? Really?

        • asifis

          Really, the holocaust denier label doesn’t really stick to Barrett, and the false flag curiosity doesn’t deserve “conspiracy nut” status.

          • “False flags” are the meat and potatoes of conspiracy theory.

          • Halloween Jack

            the false flag curiosity doesn’t deserve “conspiracy nut” status.

            JAQ off much?

  • twbb

    Adding mayonnaise to “Unflavored Gelatine” is possibly the most whitebread thing I’ve ever seen. And I once watched an episode of the Lawrence Welk show.

    • JonH

      If only it were unflavored mayo in the unflavored gelatine.

    • Snuff curry

      I don’t know, I think this can easily be trounced–whitebread-wise–with the additional additions of cottage cheese and tinned fruit. And shredded cheese product. And pastel minimarshmallows. Served on a bed of wet, torn iceberg. And don’t forget not to season anything because salt is “spicy.”

      • Snuff curry

        Then again, cake made out of potted meat sandwiches (“frosted” in mayo, obv) is pretty unbeatable in this category.

    • Casey

      Christopher Kimball would find a way to make it even whiter. “Now, for those of you who can’t handle the spiciness of mayonnaise, we recommend substituting plain yogurt instead.”

      • twbb

        For some reason various Simpsons quotes have been running through my head on this post.

        “Donuts? I specifically told you no ethnic food!”

        [Marge looking at a spice rack] “EIGHT spices? Hmm, some most be doubles. Or-eh-ga-no? What the hell?”

  • leftwingfox

    Meanwhile, at the intersection of aspic and O’Hare…

    https://youtu.be/inL-9cLYBXM?list=PLV_qemO0oatil7iRtM1JrKybU-VGFa5A7&t=314

  • los
  • los
  • los
  • los

    (maybe this “Saturday” page has also faded…),
    This didn’t make it into Aug 19? lgm page containing “Democratic Plantation” absurdity for rabblerousing’s sake, but is good link.
    Chauncey DeVega: The 10 Most Racist Moments of the GOP Primary (So Far)
    2. Herman Cain, in one of the most grotesque performances in post-civil rights-era politics to date, deftly plays his designated role as an African-American advocate for some of the Tea Party and New Right’s most racist policy positions. Most notably, in numerous interviews Cain alluded to the Democratic Party as keeping African Americans on a “plantation,” and that black conservatives were “runaway slaves” who were uniquely positioned to “free” the minds of their brothers and sisters. The implication of his ahistorical and bizarre allusion to the Democratic Party and chattel slavery was clear: black Americans are stupid, childlike and incapable of making their own political decisions, as Cain publicly observed that “only thirty percent of black people are thinking for themselves.”

    Doubling down, as a black conservative mascot for the fantasies of the Tea Party faithful, Herman Cain also suggested that anyone who accuses them of “racism” (ignoring all available evidence in support of this claim) were in fact anti-white, and the real racists.

    Herman Cain’s disdain was not limited to the black public. He also argued that undocumented immigrants should be electrocuted at the U.S. border by security fences, and that Muslim Americans are inherently treasonous and should be excluded from government. Perhaps most troubling, Herman Cain advocated for extreme forms of racial profiling in which Muslims would have to carry special identification cards.

    Racism and anti-black sentiment know no boundaries. Herman Cain demonstrates that some of its most deft practioners are (ironically) people of color.

    Also “GOP plantation” is not uncommon “alt right” term that search finds as far back as 2011.

    • CrunchyFrog

      I confess I don’t understand the psychology that causes some people to be completely anti-tribal. That is, they are totally tribal, but they join a group that hates their original tribe, spend their time shitting on their original tribe to win approval of their new tribe, yet they’ll never actually be accepted as part of the new tribe. We see this racially with Cain, Thomas, Carson, that Sheriff Clark in Milwaukee who is going out of his way to create racial violence, etc. And while they are a small minority you’ll find many other examples – including Colorado GOP Senate Candidate Darryl Glenn who talks just like Cain and Clark. But racial examples aren’t the only ones – although they may be most prominent right now.

      • Dalai Rasta

        Don’t forget Thomas Sowell, who’s been playing that game longer than any of the above save Clarence Thomas

  • Origami Isopod

    Trump’s new chief of staff is not well-liked by his ex-employees. Usually I’d bet that anyone Dana Loesch is calling “one of the worst people on God’s green earth” can’t be too bad, but not in this case.

    • Halloween Jack

      It’s been grimly amusing to watch the (Ostensibly Ex-)Virgin Ben Shapiro attack his ex-employer and Trump.

  • Pingback: Saturday Night Open Thread – World's Best Only()

It is main inner container footer text