Home / General / “C is the Cotton-field, to which This injured brother’s driven”: Visions of the Past, Thanks to Gutenberg (II)

“C is the Cotton-field, to which This injured brother’s driven”: Visions of the Past, Thanks to Gutenberg (II)

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Lest one think that the Gutenberg Project only provides bizarre books of America’s past that make ridiculous arguments, let me at least point out that you can access such texts like this 1847 anti-slavery children’s alphabet book that is really neat.

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  • Davis

    Well, that made my day. When they got to “X”, they became innovative:

    X is for Xerxes, famed of yore;
    A warrior stern was he
    He fought with swords; let truth and love
    Our only weapons be.

    At first I thought, Xerxes was a paragon of anti-slavery?

    • Hogan

      I think that’s suggesting the opposite.

  • FMguru

    M is the Merchant of the north,
    Who buys what slaves produce—
    So they are stolen, whipped and worked,
    For his, and for our use.

    Interesting contemporary admission that the North benefited greatly from the slave system.

    • Just a Rube

      Yep. And the intro includes this line:

      And you can refuse to take Candy, sweetmeat, pie or cake, Saying “no”—unless ’tis free—

      Which made me wonder, was there an equivalent to “fair-trade” sugar; i.e. sugar marketed as slave-free? Is that what the “’tis free” part refers to?

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