Home / General / Corporations: The Folks Who Want to Take Away the Weekend

Corporations: The Folks Who Want to Take Away the Weekend

Comments
/
/
/
373 Views

Remember the halcyon days of the past, where if you worked on the weekend and especially on Sunday, you would get premium pay? Not too long ago. Say goodbye to that.

Walmart discontinued Sunday premium pay, which had been $1 extra per hour, for new hires back in 2011. Those who had continued to receive it will receive a lump sum equal to half the amount of Sunday pay they received last year, according to a company release in January outlining a handful of adjustments that Walmart explained were a way of “simplifying its pay structure” — and reducing the overall cost of increasing base wages to $10 an hour across the board.

That hasn’t worked out so well for more experienced employees like eight-year Walmart veteran Nancy Reynolds, a 69-year-old cashier in Merritt Island, Fla., who works Thursday through Monday. Her base pay was already slightly above $10 an hour, so she didn’t get much of a raise, and the loss of a few extra Sunday dollars a week will hurt. “The younger people, the ones who haven’t been there that long, they got it, and I’m glad for them,” Reynolds says. “But they did it at the expense of me and everybody who’s been there a long time.”

In cutting Sunday pay, Walmart is actually behind most of the retail industry, which made that change as legal requirements to pay more on Sundays were stricken from state laws across the country. So-called “blue laws” once prohibited Sunday commerce altogether in 34 states in the 1960s. They were often weakened through compromise, with higher pay mandated in exchange for shopping being legalized. Even with no mandate, premium pay was often what the labor market demanded.

$10 on hour and work on Sunday. Sounds like a great future for those Indiana workers whose jobs have fled to Mexico and who are now going to vote Trump because of it! Why not vote Trump if this is your life.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • BGinCHI

    Well, to be fair, Indiana is a Right To Work state, not a Right To Good Wages state.

    When will people connect Republican “right to work” rhetoric with a cratering of wages? The nice thing is that the right telegraphs their intentions with that phrase.

  • LosGatosCA

    Bible Belt Republicans are pretty simply dupes.

    Too bad for them, but until they smarten up their life will be miserable and they will contribute to making life miserable for everyone else around them as well.

    Dumbasses

    • sapient

      Honestly, it’s tempting to feel this way, until they drag the rest of us with them.

  • Hogan

    “But they did it at the expense of me and everybody who’s been there a long time.”

    Well yeah. They don’t want you there for a long time. You might start seeing through their bullshit.

    • John Revolta

      Not to mention their having to pay you “slightly above” the minimum wage.

  • DrDick

    Walmart is evil, but not really any more than most American corporations. They would all love to return to indentured labor with no protections.

  • Davebo

    Making a little over $10.00 an hour after 8 years is pretty horrible. Working at that rate at age 69 is even worse.

    Those two things disgust me but honestly not getting a bump on Sunday doesn’t really. In an age of 24/7 retail Sunday is just another day (unless of course you go over 40 which will never happen at Walmart).

    • nixnutz

      Cutting anyone’s pay when they’re already making so little is shitty but I didn’t realize that was a thing anywhere anymore. I’ve never minded working weekends (am at work right now) but they could at least give her the .20 raise to make up for it.

      I remember when I was a kid I had some friends who worked in supermarkets and drug stores that were UFCW-affiliated and they got time and a half but looking at recent contracts they seem to have lost that for new hires most places.

    • Vance Maverick

      “Sunday is just another day” assumes the conclusion.

      I work a job where I get weekends off. It’s a great benefit, as I know by contrast to other places I’ve worked in the same industry. Now in our society this benefit goes only to certain privileged people — “service” work does not provide structured time off, that can be coordinated with family. We know it doesn’t have to be this way.

  • My recommendation: stop voting Republican.

    Yeah, I know–laugh out loud absurd. But there you have it.

  • humanoid.panda

    $10 on hour and work on Sunday. Sounds like a great future for those Indiana workers whose jobs have fled to Mexico and who are now going to vote Trump because of it! Why not vote Trump if this is your life.

    Or, you know, one could imagine a future in which a job in retail is not a ticket to misery, because laws make this sort of thing less likely (and hell- Obama’s hike of the overtime pay rule is working in that direction..). Like seriously, you are a labor historian, and you know far better than anyone that the idea that manufacturing work is naturally good and dignified, and work in retail in services is mindless drudgery is a myth, and a product of all sorts of political decisions and racial and gendered myths. So, why the endless snark at people pointing out that no, the 1950s are not coming back, even if you shut down capital mobility?

  • addicted44

    Maybe I’m missing something, but I suspect that the people who are talking about supporting trump only because they lost their jobs are being dishonest.

    There is another candidate who is basically talking about the same issues as Trump, and unlike Trump, his solutions are actually real solutions that get to and resolve the root of the problem. As an added bonus, his primary appeal isn’t his xenophobia and racism.

    It appears to me that the people who are losing their jobs are voting Trump because the loss of their jobs has given them added impetus to hate the weaker and powerless Other. Punching down is a lot easier and more fun than fighting the powers above.

    • afdiplomat

      The problem with this observation is not that it isn’t true in a sufficiently abstract theoretical universe; the problem is that the “vote Bernie” solution doesn’t seem to be available right now in the universe we actually inhabit. As Loomis points out in his post on “Capital Mobility and Trumpism”:

      “When you give working Americans no good options, we might think they would turn to socialism. And a few have, as the Sanders campaigns demonstrates. But without widespread leftist organizing in working-class communities, which in working-class white communities largely does not exist, the appeal of racial and class prejudice added to the appeal of seeing someone tell off the forces that have doomed them to stagnation and poverty, that’s very powerful. That’s the Trump voter.”

      I suspect Loomis would say that to most working-class Americans, Bernie Sanders looks as alien as someone from Mars, and that makes his message “unavailable” to them regardless of its theoretical correctness (and even there it’s a long way from being a complete solution).

      I’ve purchased and intend to read “Out of Sight.”  As a recently retired Foreign Service officer with a Ph.D. in government, I’m painfully aware of how disconnected my life has been from the way things actually are for most Americans; and since I take governance seriously (having been a “government guy” since I started studying political science as a teenager), I’d like to understand better the totality of what is happening. (Paul Theroux’s “Deep South,” which I just read, is another piece; so are several works I’m going through on slavery and its really pervasive consequences.)

      I’d like to see Loomis do an op-ed or two where he puts things together concisely for people in a way to encourage and direct productive action. I understand the last chapter of “Out of Sight” does some of this, but his message needs more general circulation. We really do need, for the sake of our national stability, to get a better grip on the forces that have produced Trumpism and what needs to be done to address them. and I just don’t see anyone in the political process (even the sainted Bernie) doing that in the necessary comprehensive way. As Loomis points out, “Multivariance is a thing.” Trumpism is a phenomenon with a lot of bipartisan causes.

      • Yeah, my editor would like me to write those op-eds too. And I need to do so. Finding the time is challenging.

        • afdiplomat

          Somehow I have the feeling that a person so committed to these issues as to do all the work to produce “Out of Sight” will at some point find the time for the op-eds — and I and others will be looking forward to reading them when that happens.

  • guthrie

    There’s an inherent conflict with old fashioned religion here too. Sunday was supposed to be a day of rest, at least one day free from commercial and other pressures. Now it is important for people to be able to buy and sell things every day of the week. And some forms of religions have morphed to suit that, takinga prosperity gospel approach.

    Meanwhile, the stock exchanges are only open monday to friday, how odd.

    • Brett

      The perverse thing is that by being a day free of work for most workers, it then became potentially the most convenient day to do a lot of shopping and other stuff. I worked at a Home Depot for a few months, and the busiest days we ever had were on Memorial Day and the Fourth of July.

      I think it’s better just to have a rule that you need to have two days off after five days of work – whatever those two days are. If you’re working saturday and sunday, maybe you get monday and tuesday off.

  • Sebastian_h

    “There is another candidate who is basically talking about the same issues as Trump, and unlike Trump, his solutions are actually real solutions that get to and resolve the root of the problem. As an added bonus, his primary appeal isn’t his xenophobia and racism.”

    And you know who is name definitely isn’t? Hillary Clinton. And you, as a politically aware reader may know that every time the media and/or Clinton’s team reports super delegate counts it is unfairly cutting off Sanders’ chances (the first two weeks of it were particularly bad) but guess who doesn’t know that?

    From their perspective Sanders never had a chance on the Democrats’ side–the very very establishment candidate played back room games and ‘won’ before the voting started.

    They may feel bad for how Clinton boxed out Bernie (as they see it) but that is just another example of why she is a definitely can’t be trusted establishment figure.

It is main inner container footer text