Home / General / Pat Buchanan and the politics of nostalgia

Pat Buchanan and the politics of nostalgia

Comments
/
/
/
525 Views

cunningham

TPM has a selection of quotes from Pat Buchanan’s new book (although I noticed they didn’t feature any from the chapter “Throw the Jew Down the Well: A Critique of Contemporary Neo-Conservatism”). There are a bunch of doozies, but my favorite is this one:

Perhaps some of us misremember the past. But the racial, religious, cultural, social, political, and economic divides today seem greater than they seemed even in the segregation cities some of us grew up in.

Back then, black and white lived apart, went to different schools and churches, played on different playgrounds, and went to different restaurants, bars, theaters, and soda fountains. But we shared a country and a culture. We were one nation. We were Americans.

Perhaps indeed! An inevitable consequence of becoming aware of unmarked categories (i.e., realizing that America includes lots of different peoples and lots of different cultures) is that various kinds of social divides suddenly “seem” greater than they formerly seemed.

Let be be finale of seem.

I was watching the Auburn-LSU game this weekend. Literally 95% of the players were African American. When I was a little kid these schools had no black players — and I’m not that old. Then around 1970 or so USC went to Birmingham and kicked the living daylights out of a top-ranked Alabama team, and suddenly Bear Bryant started having doubts about the merits of Plessy v. Ferguson. A few years later I heard him doing color commentary (snicker) on the broadcast of a USC-Oklahoma game, and he had the poor taste to note that Sam Bam Cunningham had done more for integration in Alabama than Martin Luther King.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • Back then, black and white lived apart, went to different schools and churches, played on different playgrounds, and went to different restaurants, bars, theaters, and soda fountains. But we shared a country and a culture. We were one nation. We were Americans.

    Ummmmmmmmmmm, hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm….doesn’t sound like any “sharing” I’ve ever heard of.

    • c u n d gulag

      “But we shared a country and a culture. We were one nation. We were Americans.”

      Yes, Pat.

      And while we could breath the same air, only because they hadn’t yet figured out a way to segregate that, we couldn’t drink from the same fountains, eat in the same places, piss or shit in the same john, work in the same jobs, or serve in the same military units – and we sure as Hell couldn’t fuck the same people – unless it was the white man doing the fucking.

      But outside of that, Pat, you’re so right – we were like THIS!

      Poor Pat.
      He misses the days when all a white man had to do to get respect and attention was ask ‘Who’s got the rope?’

      What does this racist prick need to do to lose his gig at MSNBC?
      He must have pictures of the exec’s fucking children. Or animals. Or both. Or child-animal hybrids.

      • i would urge buchanan to read john howard griffin’s “black like me,” but it would be a waste of time.

        when you are as convinced as buchanan is of bullshit, mere reality doesn’t change your perspective….

        • c u n d gulag

          Yeah, and he obviously didn’t read Ellison’s “The Invisible Man,” because the problems remain invisible for Herr Buchanon.

      • cpinva

        mr. buchanan is MSNBC’s “House Asshole”. every network has at least one (though FOX has made a determined effort to draft all of them), who makes the rest of their employees look nearly rational by comparison. good gig if you can get it.

        sadly, in bryant’s defense, he was probably right about cunningham. look what’s happened to alabama since cunningham left.

    • Bighank53

      To be fair to Pat, his definition of “sharing” pretty much is: do what I say and like it, too.

      What a shitbag.

    • David B.

      Shorter Pat Buchanan: “Pat Boone and Little Richard Sound the same to me.”

  • yes, it was 1970.

    on the other hand, it may have been in bad taste, but i’m not sure in the culture of alabama if bear bryant integrating his team wasn’t, in fact, more important than, say, the montgomery bus boycott or the birmingham campaign, at least in terms of social mores.

  • Jim Lynch

    “Then around 1970 or so USC went to Birmingham and kicked the living daylights out of a top-ranked Alabama team, and suddenly Bear Bryant started having doubts about the merits of Plessy v. Ferguson”.

    I’ve heard it said that Bryant asked his friend (and USC coach) John McKay to play ‘Bama knowing full well that they’d get their ass kicked. He understood it to be the surest way to confront and defeat gridiron segregation.

    • ploeg

      I heard likewise. Take it as you will.

      Certainly it’s rather flip to claim that Sam Bam Cunningham had done more for integration in Alabama than Martin Luther King, but it’s not as if Sam Bam Cunningham didn’t undergo some amount of risk.

      • ploeg
        • efgoldman

          I was watching the Auburn-LSU game this weekend. Literally 95% of the players were African American.

          I believe the entire introduced starting lineup for Auburn (the little pictures across the bottom of the screen) was African-American. I, too, am old enough to remember the bad old days; I said to the empty room “well I’ll be damned!”

          Buchanan is a turd. Always was, always will be.

    • elm

      Yeah, while Paul rightfully tears Buchanan a new one, he’s being too harsh on Bryant here.

      On the other hand, I doubt that Bryant had a principled opposition to segragation, he just wanted to end it to build a better football team. However, many were unable to see past their prejudices to even support integration for that reason.

      • witless chum

        I remember reading this story of Bryant around integration.

        In the 1960s, Duffy Daugherty wanted an Alabama player named Charlie Thornhill to come to Michigan State, but Thornhill preferred Notre Dame. Bear Bryant had some sort of relationship with Thornhill, though he was vaguely unable or unwilling to break the color barrier by recruting him to Bama.

        Duffy apparently knew this, and also knew that a QB recruit named Joe Namath wanted to go to MSU, but wouldn’t qualify academically. (This part of the story makes me really wonder just how academically inept Joe Namath was. Just like now, great football players would get a lot of help. And maybe some “help.”) Duffy worked out an agreement with Bryant, where Bear would push Thornhill to MSU and Duffy would push Namath to Bama.

        The way the story gets told in the 2000s is that Bear was being prevented from integrating his team as early as he’d have liked, but who knows the veracity of that. Duffy Daugherty was ahead of his time even for the Big 10, something I’m proud of having gone to MSU. Supposedly, Big 10 teams in the mid-60s tended to have a few black players, but half the starting lineup on Duffy’s great 65 and 66 teams were black.

        Not that it was exactly modern. They weren’t allowed to date white girls, though that was apparently widely flouted.

        • Bill Murray

          This part of the story makes me really wonder just how academically inept Joe Namath was.

          It takes quite a bit of time to romance every woman in the county and play football, so he had little time left over for the book learning

  • DrDick

    I decided a long time ago that Buchanan’s job was to be America’s crazy racist uncle. He gets to actually say what all the rightwingers are thinking, but afraid to admit to.

  • Pingback: Posts from around the web - OnTheEdge » OnTheEdge()

  • Jaime

    I’m sure that if Buchanan was America’s resident font of baseball pomposity instead of George Will there’d be a lot of nostalgic maunderings about the Negro Leagues too. In fact, I’m can’t say for sure that Will hasn’t run that particular number himself…

  • OT: While we’re talking about repellent MSNBC personalities saying stupid things, I saw Andrew Mitchell inform her viewers that Muqtad’ al Sadr was a puppet of Iran.

    Nevermind that Malaki’s Dawa Party is a lot closer to Iran than the Sadrists. Sadr = Shiite bad guy = Iranian cat’s paw, and that’s all we need to know.

  • Jim Lynch

    “Nevermind that Malaki’s Dawa Party is a lot closer to Iran than the Sadrists. Sadr = Shiite bad guy = Iranian cat’s paw, and that’s all we need to know”.

    “Scorecard! Get your scorecard here”!

It is main inner container footer text