Month: February 2009

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Today In Tilting At Windmills

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In General
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On February 25, 2009
The mortgage deduction is indeed bad policy. Alas, it’s pretty much an object lesson in path dependence; when you get policies like this wrong it’s almost impossible to get rid of them. But making it less regressive is potentially viable and better than nothing. Share

A Teaching Moment…

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In Uncategorized
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On February 24, 2009
I normally have a post each semester about what I’m teaching. This semester I’ve let events get away from me a bit, but no time like the present. The courses I’m teaching this semester are Diplomacy 750: Defense Statecraft, and Diplomacy 600: History of Strategic Thought (DIP 600 is a catch all for courses that […]

The endless whine of Sarah Palin

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On February 24, 2009

Please make it stop. Looking back on her interview with ABC News’ Charles Gibson, in which Palin seemed unsure of how to define the Bush doctrine, the Alaska governor said she was disrespected in a

The Lockean Proviso

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In Uncategorized
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On February 24, 2009
As someone who observed much of Locke’s governorship first-hand, I would say that just as he looks better on paper than in practice as a national candidate, so he wasn’t nearly as good a governor as he should have been. He was sort of a Naderite parody of a cautious Democrat — when it came […]

Notes from the fringe

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On February 23, 2009

Scott noted a couple of days ago that something doesn’t become a “simmering controversy” because professional lunatic Alan Keyes thinks it’s a controversy. That’s true &#

Tautology Is Not A Plan

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In Uncategorized
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On February 23, 2009
I’m not really sure about why there seems to be an endless market for op-eds in which Will Saletan informs us that the answer to political conflict just happens to coincide with Will Saletan’s normative positions on all the issues. Although, to be fair, his position is not entirely unchanged. For example, now that the […]

Death in the Afternoon

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On February 23, 2009

I’ve just read (actually re-read — first time was about 20 years ago) Hemingway’s Death in the Afternoon, his 1932 study of the Spanish bullfight. There’s a lot of interesting

Preserve Fantasy Raptor Jobs

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On February 23, 2009

Would shutting down the Raptor really put 95000 people out of work? No. David Axe has the data: Problem is, that 95,000 number counts indirect employment at firms for whom the F-22 program is just one

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