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Learning from Our Elder Activists

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Michelle Goldberg explores a topic I have thought a good bit about, as have others–that ACT-UP is an important model for us to learn about in resisting Trump and that the veterans of that movement, born out of complete desperation in the face of massive death and institutional indifference, will play a very important role in the next 4 years.

ACT UP, however, offers lessons for moving forward in the face of powerlessness, grief, and horror. When ACT UP formed in March 1987, the AIDS epidemic was six years old and had killed 40,000 people, yet President Ronald Reagan hadn’t given a single speech about it. That year the Senate, by a vote of 94–2, passed an amendment banning the Centers for Disease Control from funding AIDS programs that “promote, encourage or condone homosexual activities.” Introducing the amendment, North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms said, “We have got to call a spade a spade, and a perverted human being a perverted human being.”

It wasn’t just the government that treated gay people with hostile indifference. In 1987, the pharmaceutical company Burroughs Wellcome announced plans to charge $10,000 a year for AZT, the first AIDS drug approved for commercial production. As David France reported in How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS, anti-gay hate crimes tripled between 1985 and 1988. People with AIDS and those who loved them were a despised, exploited minority almost completely without political representation.

Through ceaseless protest and political pressure, ACT UP played a major role in forcing a government and scientific response to the AIDS crisis. It chipped away at the stigma that enshrouded victims and pushed gay rights into the mainstream. “Back in 1981 when HIV hit, it hit a community that was isolated and marginalized and criminalized—homosexuality was illegal in most states in the country,” France tells me. “Those of us today who are feeling just as disenfranchised, the lesson is the courage we should get from what happened. Even from that far away from power, it’s possible to effect social change.”

ACT UP was able to change policy because it was relentless, and at once radical and highly pragmatic. It chose its targets carefully and stayed on them consistently. When Reagan finally formed a presidential commission on HIV, there was an ACT UP person in the room at every meeting. ACT UP activists were willing to be hated, as when they invaded St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York to protest the Catholic church’s implacable opposition to condom use. But they were also eager students of power and engaged closely with the bureaucracies where life-and-death decisions were made. “Things that actually made change took a long time,” says Maxine Wolfe, another ACT UP veteran involved with the new group. She points to the effort to expand the CDC’s definition of AIDS, which before 1993 excluded many women and intravenous drug users. “Changing the CDC definition was a four-year campaign in which we used every possible strategy and tactic, from sitting in people’s offices to marching in the rain in Atlanta,” she says.

“The model of activism that ACT UP innovated is a model that they called inside-outside,” France says. “They had these armies of bodies that could show up at the drop of a phone call and stand outside these institutions that needed to be addressed, and they could do that with enough numbers, force, and clever timing that it forced somebody inside those institutions to pay attention. They also had an inside group of people who trained themselves in the science of AIDS and AIDS research. Once their comrades got those doors open, they moved through.” The group was never that big—France says its largest demonstrations drew around 3,000 people. “But they were tireless, those 3,000 people,” he says.

The two critical things to learn are that a) it is going to take some sort of model like this to fight Trump and b) small groups of committed activists can accomplish a lot. Given that more than half of voters voted for Hillary Clinton, to say the least Donald Trump’s values are not the values of most Americans. Brave leaders motivating dispirited people on the left is so, so important.

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  • Incontinentia Buttocks

    That year the Senate, by a vote of 94–2…

    Always worth remembering votes like this when people claim that the Democratic Party has done nothing but move to the right over the last three decades.

    • delazeur

      People who say that have no idea what they are talking about.

      • DrDick

        True. The move to the right occurred in the late 70s and 1980s. Bill Clinton was probably the apogee of that.

        • random

          I love how you guys are always changing the dates of the Great Shillening.

          • DrDick

            I have never moved the dates and have consistently said that the rightward move happened in the mid-70s, with the emergence of what would become the DLC which sought to overcome the massive Republican fundraising advantage by adopting more corporate friendly policies. The Clintons were at the heart of that. The fact that you are too young to remember any of that does not mean it did not happen. I lived through it as an adult.

            • random

              You probably were not actually thinking ‘man the Dems sure are moving to the right’ during that 20-year stretch where they held office for a total of 4 years.

              It’s also really hard to see how Clinton is objectively to the right of characters like Carter, LBJ, JFK, FDR etc. And characterizing a party as ‘moving to the right’ at the same time it’s experiencing a massive exodus of bigots is also extremely problematic.

              • DrDick

                Actually, I was, since the Democrats controlled Congress for all but four years of that period, and Congress has more impact on policy overall than the president. If you think “End of Welfare as We Know It” Clinton was not to the right of those folks, you are disqualified from ever discussing politics.

            • econoclast

              The one thing they definitely moved right on over that period was regulation. Both Carter and Clinton were deregulators. But this tends to be conflated with everything else.

              • DrDick

                Also on welfare.

      • Bill Murray

        anyone that uses a single scale to characterize politics doesn’t know what they are talking about

        • delazeur

          Agreed.

  • Peterr

    From Government Executive comes this little tidbit about DC folks who are learning . . .

    The largest federal employee unions have seen an uptick in membership since the election, as President-elect Donald Trump has vowed major shakeups to the civil service.

    The American Federation of Government Employees netted nearly 1,300 new, dues-paying members in November, a more than 50 percent increase in its monthly average over the previous year. AFGE now has more than 309,000 members, an all-time high for the union.

    Can you say “Joe Hill”? Sure you can.

  • Davis X. Machina

    To borrow a football metaphor, ACT-UP began deep in their own territory. It must have been damn lonely.

    Any movements today against the coming storm begin on the other guy’s 46 yard line. Army of millions, too.

    • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

      The trick is motivation. ACT-UP people were motivated- they and their friends were dying, and little was being done to help and more was being done by people like Helms to make the situation worse.

      Every once in a while I get calls from students at my old college looking for alumni donations. Sometimes we talk about the Vietnam War protests, and they all say how wonderful it was that we were so motivated while it’s hard today to get students fired up. I tell them it’s not that we were better people, it’s that when your ass is going to be drafted when you graduate in a year or a few, it gets your attention.

      It seems to me that a lot of people are hoping/pretending that Trump won’t be that bad. We won’t make much progress until we get beyond that, and I hope that there’s enough time to organize once people realize Trump’s true nature and plans before it’s too late.

      • efgoldman

        it’s that when your ass is going to be drafted when you graduate in a year or a few, it gets your attention.

        Yes. I was exactly the right age, prior to lottery numbers. People who remember the antiwar movement as great and glorious tend to forget that motivational detail.
        The thing people might forget about ACT-UP is how gloriously in-your-face they were.
        [FWIW my dad was able to get me into the reserves at the last minute. I’m not the least bit regretful or guilty about not going to Vietnam.]

  • nkh

    On the issue of their influence on the CDC and AIDS, I think Mary Guinan’s recollections are a useful counterpoint. Not saying that they weren’t important and she was talking mostly about ACT UP for Women, but a reminder to stay somewhat grounded.

    • Origami Isopod

      Eh. The thing about protests is that you want people who are passionate and energetic. And in the case of ACT-UP, both For Women and the main group, they were not only those things but absolutely terrified of what was happening to people in their community and in some cases themselves. It’s unfortunate that they targeted Guinan for reasons related to their own scientific illiteracy, and it would have been nice if their organization had reined them in, but when people are dropping like flies that kind of reaction is understandable if not productive.

      On a side note, I had to look Guinan up. I’d read And the Band Played On a long time ago, but I hadn’t recalled her name from it. This interview with her from last spring is great. LOL IRL at the bit about her 60 Minutes interview and her mother’s reaction. Also, note her contempt for news media misinformation.

  • Murc

    I have one caveat here: this kind of organizing and activism is only workable in a society where certain standards and norms still hold sway.

    There’s a non-trivial chance Trump goes the full Duterte, simply makes murdering your political foes in the streets formal US policy.

    • Peterr

      Which is exactly what ACT-UP was facing under Reagan. For folks with AIDS, all the government had to do was ignore them and wait, and they’d die.

      It wasn’t quite “murder by inaction” but damn close.

      • DrDick

        Indeed. You could routinely get killed for being gay then.

      • science_goy

        Hey, the government didn’t entirely ignore the sick and dying. They cracked a few jokes about them, too.

        Plenty of the establishment’s political foes were straight-up murdered during the Civil Rights era as well, but few would argue that that effort was futile.

        • cpinva

          “His cowardice in the face of the crisis will forever tarnish his legacy.”

          the author of the article acts as though Reagan had much of a positive legacy to tarnish, he didn’t. by the time 8 years had passed, half of his administrative appointees were in jail/on trial/awaiting sentencing/being investigated.

          this could be the bar that Trump seeks to vault over.

    • ema

      It won’t start with murder. Names will be taken, jobs will be lost, evictions and property seizures will follow, beatings, rapes, and involuntary commitments to psych wards, and informants will prosper.

      The cognitive dissonance of being a reality-based person living in a post-truth totalitarian society and the fight for daily survival will be mind crushing and all consuming.

      • science_goy

        How ’bout we work to keep it from getting to that point, rather than throwing our hands up in despair several weeks before the inauguration even happens, eh?

        • ema

          It’s not about giving up, it’s about preparing for a realistic scenario.

    • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

      There’s a non-trivial chance Trump goes the full Duterte

      There’s a non-trivial chance that under Trump that thousands of US citizens are murdered? And that Trump brags about personally killing some of them? I’d say that’s the definition of a trivial chance.
      Instead of the hysterics, maybe we should focus on the awful things that actually are likely to happen?

      • random

        It’s not a trivial chance. If it happens, nobody is going to respond with “Well I never saw THAT coming. I mean who knew, right?”

        • science_goy

          Widespread predictions of a phenomenon don’t necessarily reflect the likelihood of it happening.

          Millions of people believed the world would end in 2012, but the chances of that happening were always essentially zero, no matter how many people bought into the prediction. Hell, for that matter, almost every Republican I know sincerely believed that Obama would cancel the 2016 election and declare himself president-for-life.

          • cpinva

            “almost every Republican I know sincerely believed that Obama would cancel the 2016 election and declare himself president-for-life.”

            to be a republican requires you to either be incredibly stupid, or incredibly wealthy (there is no inbetween). those who sincerely believed this were the stupid wing of the party.

            • John Revolta

              I knew (or knew of, anyway) some crazy lefties who were dead certain that Bush & Co. were gonna pull some similar stunt in 2008. Booga booga!

              • mikeSchilling

                I can’t remember the last time the presidency was about to change parties and no one predicted that. It seems restrained this year, compared to fantasies about a Hillary attempt at a coup.

              • random

                Thinking that Donald will go full-Duterte is approximately as unreasonable as thinking he’ll appoint a pro-life Justice to the SCOTUS.

                The law enforcement crackdown that Duterte is doing and Donald is praising him for doing and Donald has spent 2 years promising to do here is absolutely something that an unrestrained President could easily do here. It’s not a trivial chance at all.

          • random

            Widespread predictions of a phenomenon don’t necessarily reflect the likelihood of it happening.

            It’s not a worse metric than reflexively declaring ‘trivial chance’ based on nothing, which is really what the counter-argument amounts to. You don’t have some formula that tells you the probability here.

            Also there seems be some Duterte-inflation going on here.

            The main mechanism by which Duterte kills people is his vigilante followers and a nation-wide crackdown on crime by law enforcement officers. There is a more than trivial chance of both of those things happening here.

      • Just_Dropping_By

        There is a certain irony in people declaring that Trump should not be “normalized,” while at the same time making apocalyptic predictions about Trump’s behavior, given that if (and likely when) those apocalyptic predictions fail to come true, the current freak-outs will have done far more to “normalize” Trump.

        • tonycpsu

          Thanks for your input as always, Just_Wanking_By.

          • jim, some guy in iowa

            just-dropping-trou works too

            I came, I mooned, I left

            • Origami Isopod

              Just_Dropping_Turds.

        • cpinva

          “given that if (and likely when) those apocalyptic predictions fail to come true, the current freak-outs will have done far more to “normalize” Trump.”

          um, no. how do you figure this? that people are expressing concern, about a President Trump doing things that Candidate Trump said he’d like to do, is somehow normalizing him?

          we have no idea, since you failed to provide any examples, to prove your point. we can (reasonably, I think) assume you just pulled it out of your ass.

          • mikeSchilling

            Trump bragged that he’d going to start murdering people? I admit, I didn’t listen to him carefully, but I think I’d have noticed that one.

            • random

              There were multiple incidents where Donald bragged about his ability to commit acts of homicide or expressed eagerness to personally commit acts of homicide.

              This is not including his various promises to use the military to outright murder innocent civilians overseas.

              • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

                There were multiple incidents where Donald bragged about his ability to commit acts of homicide

                Bragging that your followers are so committed that even murder wouldn’t sway them is pretty far from an actual inclination to go full Dutuerte

                expressed eagerness to personally commit acts of homicide.

                We’ll need a cite for this one.

                This is not including his various promises to use the military to outright murder innocent civilians overseas.

                This has been US policy since at least 9/11, and really, for most of the 20th century as well.

                • random

                  We’ll need a cite for this one.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=1&v=PKq-it0EuOg

                  He’s practically climaxing while fantasizing about personally killing people with his own hand. Then going on to praise vigilante violence in general.

                  This whole speech is at least 3/5ths Dutarte, who bragged about personally provoking criminals and then killing them, and who’s primary political victims have mostly been criminals and criminal suspects killed in a wave of enabled vigilantism and law enforcement.

                  It’s not at all crazy to think one or both of the remaining 2/5ths are missing here because Donald previously didn’t have the power to make it happen.

        • How often do you ever Just Drop By here to post something other than “Well, ackshually…”?

      • XTPD

        Fine then. How about him going full Niyazov?

  • michael8robinson

    Uh, no.

    “The two critical things to learn are that a) it is going to take some sort of model like this to fight Trump and b) small groups of committed activists can accomplish a lot. Given that more than half of voters voted for Hillary Clinton, to say the least Donald Trump’s values are not the values of most Americans.”

    It is precisely because Trump will governing from an unpopular minority position that the ACT UP model is inappropriate (if not counterproductive).

    The only point in common between the two scenarios is a Republican president.

    • michael8robinson

      This is what you have to work with:

      “With five weeks until the inauguration in Washington, Trump will enter the Oval Office with lower-than-normal expectations. Just one in 10 people say Trump will be one of the greatest presidents of all time, while one-quarter think he will be above average and 16 percent expect him to be about the same as others. Twelve percent say he will be below average and nearly one-third say he will go down in history as one of the worst U.S. leaders.”

      Work it.

      http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/voters-give-trump-his-highest-favorability-score-so-far/article/2609682

      • The Great God Pan

        But the thrust of that article is that his unfavorable ratings are dropping rapidly. He is viewed more favorably than ever before, 9 points higher than last month. Nearly half of Americans now view his “personal style of expression [as] appropriate for a president.”

        So what we have to work with is a population that is quickly abandoning any reservations about Trump.

    • Origami Isopod

      It is precisely because Trump will governing from an unpopular minority position that the ACT UP model is inappropriate (if not counterproductive).

      Care to elaborate? Unless it’s just tone trolling of the “All the uppity gays will make people side with Trump” sort, in which case you can keep it to yourself.

      • tsam

        I think this is one of the resident trolls who adopts the racially stereotypical nyms to be a racist fuck.

    • DrDick

      Proving that you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. I lived through the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, the Anti-War Movement, and the Gay Rights movement. Being nice accomplishes nothing and never has.

      • efgoldman

        Being nice accomplishes nothing and never has.

        Depends what you mean by “being nice.” MLK accomplished a hell of a lot with non-violence, although some people took some horrible risks and some paid with their lives.

        • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

          some people took some horrible risks and some paid with their lives.

          Unfortunately that was going to happen no matter what tactics the Civil Rights movement used, and I think MLK was arguably the most critical/important US leader in the 20th Century. As screwed up as our country remains racially, IMO any other leader would have us in a worse state today.

        • DrDick

          However, MLK was only effective because there were a whole lot of people out there threatening to burn the place down. I should have said “just being nice accomplishes nothing”. You really need a mix of both in any social movement. The white establishment could bargain with MLK, but would never have done so without Stokely Carmichael, Malcom X, and the Panthers. Similarly, the Gandhi succeeded because of the actions of more violent and extreme revolutionary movements in India.

          • MAJeff

            And non-violence wasn’t about being nice. It was “shut the motherfucker down” instead of “burn the motherfucker down.”

            • DrDick

              Exactly. None of these “respectable” revolutionaries was regarded as such at the time. MLK was routinely reviled as a “communist” and a law breaker.He was only canonized after his death to delude people like michael8robinson into believing that you can force change without making those in power very uncomfortable.

  • The ActUp Oral History Project is terrific (see esp. ‘Interviews’). And if you haven’t already seen How to Survive a Plague, do so.

    Also, I’ve begun to collect various resources on what to do and read to get through the next few hard years here. Suggestions welcome!

  • Taylor

    I could see Roger Stone’s ratfuckers instigating ACT-UP like protests, to discredit the resistance against Herr Trump.

    I am guessing someone like Conway will be the first to take the phrase “Silent Majority” out of its mothballs…..

  • AMK

    This sort of work requires a high level of cohesion and organization–much easier to achieve with 3,000 people than millions, which is why small highly organized groups run circles around political majorities all the time. If blue state governments, congressional Democrats and outside stakeholders actually managed to achieve a basic level of cooperation, many of the worst aspects of Trumpism could be mitigated. But the cats don’t herd themselves….

  • pianomover

    Like the Vietnam Nam war protests before them the threat of death gets people out on the streets.

    • Hogan

      No–actual death gets people out in the streets.

      ACT-UP was focused on a very specific issue. “Trump” is not such an issue. We’re going to need lots of ACT-UPs.

      • LWA

        I went today to a rally in Los Angeles, organized by immigrants rights groups.
        For a lot of them, Trump’s agenda is very a real threat of actual death, were they to be deported.

        Even for me, a middle aged white professional, the threat of losing Medicare/ Social Security is the real threat that I will spend the final decades of my life in suffering, illness and early death.

        • Hogan

          Immigrants need an ACT-UP. Seniors need an ACT-UP. Women of childbearing age need an ACT-UP. It’s hard to get them all into one ACT-UP. It’s a model for single-issue organizing. Trump is not a single issue.

          • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

            Agreed Trump is not a single issue, but it’s easier to get people to unite in cooperation against a common adversary even if their reasons differ.

            • rhino

              No, it isn’t. All that happens is that every narrow interest group fights with all the others over who should take priority in the allocation of effort and resources.

              Trying to get 10-20 different resistance groups to work together is a *terrible* idea. Let them each pursue their own agenda, and make the trumpistas divide their energy trying to cut the heads off the hydra. It’s much harder to fight 100 duck sized horses than one horse sized duck…

  • LWA

    I’ve used the ACT-UP/ SSM activists as a model for a while now.
    It isn’t that they are a perfect analog for what is happening now, nothing ever is.

    The salient lesson for me is that public opinion and the “conventional wisdom” that gets spouted endlessly by media is actually a highly malleable thing, subject to persuasion and influence.

    In 1985 it was conventional wisdom that homosexuality was a strange lifestyle choice, and some people were liberal enough to tolerate it, within sensible restraints.

    The astonishing turnabout in public opinion didn’t just happen, it was the result of constant pressure and argumentation and activism.
    It was activists willing to be assholes and ruin dinner parties, willing to be “counterproductive” with protests at churches, to be annoying and exasperating.

    There is always a strain in activist thought that we should change things, but there should never be unpleasantness or anger or discomfort.
    But it never works that way- social change is always painful and awkward and involves suffering.

    And I say this as someone with Trump voters in my immediate and extended family, with all the strain and icy conversations that result.

    • BobBobNewhartNewhartSpecial

      In 1985 it was conventional wisdom that homosexuality was a strange lifestyle choice, and some people were liberal enough to tolerate it, within sensible restraints.

      It’s hard to believe that the Supreme Court actually upheld sodomy laws around this time.

    • science_goy

      I think most Trump voters are also highly malleable. Most of them, save the hardline racists, don’t want to be on the wrong side of history. When it’s clear that they’re on the losing side, I suspect many of them will switch and pretend they were always totally pro-LGBT, for instance. At least this is my anecdotal experience.

      • tsam

        Really? I’ve had quite the opposite experience. In most cases, I can’t see the brain power to contextualize themselves with history, and even if they did, their knowledge of history is straight up fucked.

      • AMK

        Many of them already profess to support gay rights or at least not care about the issue. Lots of them probably just realize that pinkwashing is the easiest way to try to make their views seem moderate and reasonable; others genuinely don’t have a problem with gay rights because it’s tangential to the larger racial politics project.

        • RBS

          I like to have sex with Swiss cheese because it’s racially pure.

          • RBS

            As an example: I went to Sam’s Club the other day and brought this really hot 5 lb wheel of Swiss Cheese, took it back to my place and phoooaar!

            • efgoldman

              Hey look. It’s racist troll time.

            • Judas Peckerwood

              We know who you are and you just made the list.

            • econoclast

              Whoever improved RBS’ comments is the greatest hero of our time.

    • osceola

      At that time, I was in college, and met gay people for the first time (that I was aware of, I mean). Some were closeted, others were sort of out but didn’t care if certain people knew, others were out and proud.

      It was a matter of me being of that age where I was away from home for good and learning about the larger world.

    • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

      I’m reminded that my father was remarkably non-racist for someone born around the time of the first airplane flight into a wealthy family. Yet even he was bothered by civil disobedience so much that he was opposed to MLK.

  • Bitter Scribe

    What a miserable excuse for a human being Jesse Helms was.

    • tsam

      Yeah. And people look at ShitGibbon like he’s an anomaly in conservative politics. He’s not. He’s a resurgence of the same old shit.

      • Origami Isopod

        It’s the superficial details, not really the substance, that they’re talking about.

      • efgoldman

        people look at ShitGibbon like he’s an anomaly in conservative politics.

        Helms was consciously and proudly an old school, George Wallace / Ross Barnett / Strom Thurmond segregationist racist.
        Vermilion McRapey Vermin is racist, to be sure, but if being inclusive could somehow feed his narcissism, he’d change in a heartbeat.

        • RBS

          “Gouda”, eh? I thought I smelled something foul around here… Give me Swiss or give me … a sweat sock that SMELLS like Swiss cheese.

          • Judas Peckerwood

            You limp-dick nazis aren’t the only ones who keep lists.

  • RBS

    You don’t get it. Do you? Until a man has played “Hot sausage roll” with Swiss cheese, like I have played with Swiss cheese, he cannot really call himself a man.

  • RBS

    Read Radix Journal and seek a better understanding why I like to make sweet love to Swiss Cheese.

  • XTPD

    troll alert

    • RBS

      Swiss Cheese Alert! Does anyone have any lube?

    • RBS

      Shouldn’t you be playing with Swiss cheese this time of year? I’d lend you some of mine, if you don’t mind wiping it off first.

    • jim, some guy in iowa

      is what this one does even trolling? more like a dog puking up roadkill

      • RBS

        Have I mentioned I REALLY love Swiss cheese? In a way a man could never love a woman. Or Edam.

      • XTPD

        Troll can’t even get the commenters’ ethnicities/religions right.

        • jim, some guy in iowa

          what I find funny is that trump has already dropped trollie, but trollie hasn’t figured it out yet. he may never figure it out, based on available evidence

          • efgoldman

            It must really be angry and determined, to keep chasing new nyms for the sake of getting all its posts deleted.
            Just another keyboard kkkommando without the balls to actually go out and do anything. In 1938 Germany it would have been a Gestapo informant, without the stones to enlist and take real action.

        • Can’t spell dreidel, either.

          • efgoldman

            Can’t spell dreidel, either.

            Probably can’t spell its own real name without mom’s help. I’m sure she’s soooo proud.

  • tsam

    Ok, now THAT is how you tune up a troll. Well done, troll fixing person.

  • Harry R. Sohl

    Breaking: Trump’s inaugural speech leaked!

    Цомрадес:

    И станд хере тодаы. Биглы, тхе бест, итьс хууге!

    Форты-фиве Америцанс хаве ноw такен тхе пресидентиал оатх. Еверы со офтен тхе оатх ис такен амидст гатхеринг цлоудс анд рагинг стормс. Ат тхесе моментс, Америца хас царриед он.

    Со ит хас беен. Со ит муст бе wитх тхис генератион оф Америцанс.

    Оур натион ис ат wар, агаинст а фар-реачинг нетwорк оф виоленце анд хатред. Оур ецономы ис бадлы wеакенед, а цонсеqуенце оф греед анд ирреспонсибилиты он тхе парт оф соме. Биллионаирес wилл фих тхис – еспециаллы социопатхс! Ха! Иьм юст фуцкинг wитх ыоу! Итьс хууге [меанинг: мы дицк!]!

    Америцаьс децлине ис иневитабле, анд тхе нехт генератион муст лоwер итс сигхтс.

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