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The Racists & The Shoe-Shine Boy

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I’m still waiting for reputable conservatives to repudiate Scott Terry’s statements, but I understand if they’re reluctant because I couldn’t prove that the Scott Terry whose reading list I linked to is the same Scott Terry from CPAC. Now I can:

Many of you are visiting this blog due to the recent CPAC controversy, where my friend Matt Heimbach and I, made national news by showing up and asking (in civil, articulate tones, mind you) a few simple questions.

What was our main concern?

There is a lot of rhetoric in the conservative movement about reaching out the mestizo demographic, or reaching out to the homosexuals and blacks.

Our question: why not reach out to whites?

In case you had any doubt about whether his concerns were racialist or racist in origin, here’s how he answers that question:

This is exactly what the GOP needs to do, as a matter of fact.  Steve Sailer and the guys at VDARE have done an excellent job in pointing this out.  Please educate yourself about the Sailer Strategy.

It’s not that he hates black people, he’s merely upset that

The GOP wants us all to blend together into a mocha-colored, capitalist utopia!

And he’s working on more reading lists! Here he is trying to define the “Kinist” canon. What’s so bad about that? So long as you also believe that God ordained the social order and advocate that man’s first duty is to “love one’s own kind,” absolutely nothing! And Terry takes “lov[ing] one’s own kind” very seriously. Just look at his alarm clock:

A beautiful white girl was slaughtered while taking a ride in the top of a double-decker school bus; the cry was heard:  “Wake up!”

Another beautiful white girl, the more beautiful because she was in the late stages of a pregnancy, was attacked by a gang of twelve savage animals.  A white lawyer stands in passionate defense of one of the animals.  The sane yell “Wake up!”

If I were a professor of rhetoric, I might have something to say about Terry’s choice of unnecessary adjectives here, if only because he seems as obsessed with the deaths of “beautiful white girl[s]” as a latter-day Nancy Grace. But that’s not to say Terry doesn’t have culture. He goes to the theater to see

a half-descent [sic?] portrayal of a group of Godless pagans, prancing around in their celebration of the downfall of Western Civilization.

Is that a pun or one of those Aryan-equivalent-of-Freud’s slips? Doesn’t matter. This man, with his belief in the separation of races and the divinely ordained social order (which he just so happens to sit atop), is clearly an outlier in the modern conservative movement. No real or respectable conservative holds these beliefs, or at the very least, no real or respectable conservative would air them this unabashedly.

A real or respectable conservative like National Review‘s Jillian Kay Melchior would write a paean to “[t]he simple shoe shine” in which, through great effort, she managed to avoid using the word “boy.” She would write nothing of the divinely inspired social order, but instead  let the accompanying photograph say a little something about it:

And unbeknownst to Mechior, this shoe-shine man, Dino Wright, knows exactly which game he’s playing when he “creat[ed] this entrepreneurial activity”:

CPAC and events like it boost business for Wright. He says he thinks it’s because he “provides a very important service to this very image-conscious group.”

You’d have to be as dense as Melchior to believe the “service” he’s paying to “this very image-conscious group” has anything to do with shining shoes.

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