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Sustain the President and You Protect the White Man

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Any similarities between the Trump administration and that of Andrew Johnson are surely coincidental.

A White House press briefing focused on President Donald Trump’s proposed changes to the green card application process spiraled out of control Wednesday, with White House adviser Stephen Miller accusing CNN’s Jim Acosta of bad faith and ignorance after Acosta said the bill appeared like an attempt to “engineer a racial and ethnic flow” of immigrants.

The bill, which Trump announced Wednesday alongside Sens. David Perdue (R-GA) and Tom Cotton (R-AR), would prioritize green card applicants based on things like English-speaking ability and job skills.

“The Statue of Liberty says give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to breathe free — doesn’t say anything about speaking English or being able to be a computer programmer,” Acosta told Miller. “Aren’t you trying to change what it means to be an immigrant coming into this country if you’re telling them, you have to speak English? Can’t people learn how to speak English when they get here?

Miller eventually said the sentiment wasn’t relevant: “In 1970, when we let in 300,000 people a year, was that violating or not violating the Statue of Liberty law of the land?” he asked rhetorically.

Of course, 1970 was the end of the lowest period of immigration in American history. Also:

The Justice Department plans to investigate colleges and universities whose admissions policies discriminate against white applicants, according to an internal memo revealed by the New York Times Tuesday.

The initiative, which will reportedly be overseen by a DOJ Civil Rights Division heavy with Trump appointees, would be charged with hiring attorneys to explore “investigations and possible litigation related to intentional race-based discrimination in college and university admissions,” the Times reported.

The project’s reveal prompted immediate concern from civil rights advocates, with Kristen Clarke of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law calling the action “deeply disturbing.”

“It would be a dog whistle that could invite a lot of chaos and unnecessarily create hysteria among colleges and universities who may fear that the government may come down on them for their efforts to maintain diversity on their campuses,” Clarke told the Times.

This would mark only the latest disturbing reversal in how the federal government interprets civil rights law since Jeff Sessions became Attorney General. Last week, DOJ lawyers argued that federal civil rights law did not, in fact, apply to “discrimination based on sexual orientation.”

Meanwhile, the first day of my cross-country drive ended in Springfield, Illinois. I got into town, walked into a pizza joint, and heard one of the workers go on a racist rant about how blacks [not the word he used] need to be shot and hanged. There’s someone who would be an Andrew Johnson or Donald Trump voter. I guess I am indeed in Real America (TM) now.

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  • efgoldman

    was that violating or not violating the Statue of Liberty law of the land?” he asked rhetorically.

    Because a poem that Emma Lazarus wrote. quoted on the base of the statue, is just the same as a law passed by congress and signed by "the president."

    Holy fuck, the ignorance of these people – and the stupidity they assume among others. It’s beyond embarrassing!

    • tsam100

      They’re assumptions about the ignorance of about half the American voters are well founded, I think. They’ll hear “merit” and think these guys are on the right track. What’s wrong with merit? I got merit, and a collection of bumper stickers to prove it.

    • thomas

      It was in response to this:

      ““The Statue of Liberty says give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to breathe free — doesn’t say anything about speaking English or being able to be a computer programmer,” Acosta told Miller.”

      • Deborah Bender

        There was a good PBS documentary about the history of the Statue of Liberty. The narrator was describing the festivities and speeches on the day when everyone gathered to see Her mounted on Her pedestal for the first time. “No one said anything about immigrants.”

        The New Colossus Poem was written later.

        • thomas

          It’s interesting how that poem has come to define the statue, considering how little it had to do with it.

          • Deborah Bender

            I think it’s a brilliant poem and does for the Statue of Liberty what the Gettysburg Address does for the revolutionary ideal of self-government–expands the original idea in a way that is not a distortion, but gives it a connection to ordinary people.

            • thomas

              Totally agree, I think there should be a statue of liberty law of the land.

              • rea

                A Statute of Liberty

        • BiloSagdiyev

          ” Miller was absolutely correct that the formal name of the statue is Liberty Enlightening the World. The idea of America as a place of refuge came later.”
          America! It’s the greatest place! But you shouldn’t come find out for yourself. Just take our word for it. What’s that? Did you roll your eyes? (reaches for button to launch cruise missiles)

        • smartone2

          Wrote the New Colossus Poem was written for an auction to RAISE MONEY for the pedestal . The Poem predates the statue construction and mounting.

          • Deborah Bender

            Ah, I didn’t know that. IIRC the poem was published on the front page of a major NY newspaper (the Herald?) so that would make sense if the dates are right.

            The museum in the pedestal has, or had when I visited it, a good deal of information about the campaign to raise money to finance it. It was a surprisingly modern campaign; business tie-ins and merchandise along with collecting pennies from school children.

      • Hogan

        I think he was sarcastically suggesting that Acosta thinks the poem has the force of law.

        • efgoldman

          I think he was sarcastically suggesting that Acosta thinks the poem has the force of law.

          I only read the transcript when I wrote the comment. I didn’t hear his tone.
          However it’s probably correct that Miller doesn’t know or doesn’t care about the difference.

    • Deborah Bender

      I watched a clip of that on cable news. There is actually a policy-driven argument (other than that our policy is to admit only immigrants who look like me) that Miller could have made in response to that reporter’s question, instead of trying to browbeat him with phony outrage.

      “At the turn of the last century, when Emma Lazarus wrote her poem, the United States was industrializing and had need of a lot of unskilled workers. Our country has a more developed economy now. What we need to maintain prosperity is a smaller number of immigrants, ones who have skills and come here ready to make a contribution from Day One.”

      A guy like Miller has had no practice making a case that will make sense to people who don’t share his assumptions and values

      • Gareth

        If he said that in Belarusian, it would just emphasise the point.

        • NewishLawyer

          Yiddish. Miller’s ancestors would have spoken Yiddish when they came over.

          • Gareth

            My mistake.

          • Deborah Bender

            My maternal ancestors came from the Ukraine and they spoke Yiddish FWIW.

      • Junipermo

        Yes, but the actual policy is only white immigrants need apply, and millions of people voted for Trump on that basis, so Miller and gang probably see no reason to employ an argument like the one you just made.

        • Deborah Bender

          I made reference to that (only people who look like me). Normally a WH press secretary sees his or her job as informing the public of the POTUS’s activities in a way that puts those activities in a favorable light. When announcing a legislative initiative, that would entail explaining it in terms and with arguments that will appeal to the general public, not just the President’s supporters.

          Immigration policy always involves tradeoffs, so it is not hard to come up with defenses for any policy that falls between the extremes of completely open borders and no immigrants whatsoever. Some cable TV commentators were saying last night that Trump’s intention was to stir up his base, not to get the bill passed, so no attempt was made to appeal to anyone outside the base. As we saw, Miller was actually more hostile and combative to the skeptical reporters than he needed to be. I attributed this to inexperience, but it might have been intentional.

  • pseudo-gorgias

    There’s someone who would be an Andrew Johnson or Donald Trump voter

    Of course there many two time Obama voters who then voted for trump, and who could be receptive to a democratic message properly constructed. But you know Hillary was the perfect candidate all trump voters are irredeemable etc

    • Erik Loomis

      Exactly. That’s the exact fucking argument I’ve made since forever. Hillary is god and can do no wrong. I’m glad you know what the fuck you are talking about.

      • pseudo-gorgias

        You’re right I have no clue what I’m talking about. After all you’re the history professor who blogs about Andrew Johnson voters in the face of the fact the man was never on the ballot for president.

        • McAllen

          You’re right I have no clue what I’m talking about

          Accidental sincerity.

        • kindasorta

          That’s almost as salient a criticism of the sentence “There’s someone who would be an Andrew Johnson or Donald Trump voter” as pointing out that Andrew Johnson died in 1875.

          • N__B

            I dreamed I saw Johnson last night, alive as you or me. Says I, Andy, you’re 142 years dead. I never died, says he. I never died, says he.

            • Erik Loomis

              Not bad.

              • N__B

                Like a lot of other jokes, it wouldn’t be funny if the world were a better place.

                • DrS

                  We wouldn’t need them.

          • Unemployed_Northeastern

            Andrew Johnson is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice.

        • spencer_e9876

          Um, please show me where Erik wrote that there actually were any Johnson voters.

          He said “would be an Andrew Johnson voter” – would be if Johnson had ever been on the ballot for president, would be if they’d been alive when that happened, would be but for who knows whatever reason.

          Sweet Jeeeebus, you’re a tedious fucker.

          • There were plenty of Johnson voters, because the presidency is not the only elected office in the country, and Johnson held many of them before he was President. pseudo-gorgias gives every sign of being the sort of ignorant buffoon who is incapable of recognising this, however.

            • the actual Bajmahal

              I liked Johnson best when he was the Mayor of Rockridge.

      • efgoldman

        Oh good, it’s not just me

      • ExpatJK

        In fact, this blog is know as Lawyers Guns and Money: Worshipping at the Hillary Altar. Or wait, am I on the wrong site?

      • liberalrob

        Technically I think Hillary would be a goddess…

    • Socrates

      By the dog! You’re even stupider than the real Gorgias!

      • joel_hanes

        Socrates sorely missed the Disqus “block interlocutor” facility.

        But here in the technical vastness of The Future, I can simply decide never to waste another second of my time reading p-g’s effluent.

        • JKTH

          I actually hadn’t blocked anyone on here until I used it on PG a few days ago. There’s no point in reading that shit.

      • Philip

        But is “smart” the same as “brave”? /rimshot

    • Karen

      I’ll bet good money that those Obama to Trump voters made their decision on Hillary’s distinct lack of a penis* and that no policy position she had would have made any difference. I put you in that group.

      *I know that genitals don’t make gender, but the kind of person who would vote for Obama and then Trump probably does think that what’s between your legs is more important than what’s in your head.

  • Hondo

    You didn’t eat at that fucking shithole did you, Erik? Besides walking out in protest, eating pizza in Springfield, Ill. would be like eating heat lamp sushi at a Love’s truck stop in the Oklahoma panhandle.

    • BigHank53

      Came to make a similar comment. Loomis lives in New England, where they know how to make a fucking pizza. Pizza in Illinois? May as well just get one of those frozen things at the supermarket and throw it on your engine–it couldn’t be any worse.

      • Mike Lommler

        Hey now, I grew up in Springfield. I’ll not have you outsiders trashing the place. That’s MY right as an expat!

        But yeah, the pizza is not good. It managed to develop a couple craft beer bars and breweries, though, but of course only AFTER I moved away.

        • Mike Lommler

          Also, thing you learn when you grow up in Springfield–Lincoln did not win the county (you know, the one he lived in) when he ran for re-election in 1864.

          • Erik Loomis

            Was he an illegitimate loser for parts of the 1860s left like when Al Gore didn’t win Tennessee in 2000?

            • Incontinentia Buttocks

              Funny how “Trump didn’t even win New York” isn’t a thing.

              • Erik Loomis

                Going to have to file this away for later use

              • Lord Stoneheart

                Shockingly, his home city seems to hate him the most for some reason.

                • Mike Lommler

                  Could… could familiarity bring contempt?

                • Lord Stoneheart

                  Nah that can’t be it.

                  (I grew up in upstate NY, so after both the Dem primaries, and the general election my Facebook feed was pretty much “Why didn’t X win NY? Look at all the counties they won!” I guess it was at least different people in those two different times)

                • BiloSagdiyev

                  _Decades_ of familiarity.

              • Pseudonym

                New York isn’t part of Real America.

                Incidentally, Tennessee wouldn’t have been part of Real America either if Gore had won it.

            • Mike Lommler

              He didn’t even campaign in Sangamon County!

            • Mike Lommler

              Erik, which pizza place was it? I want to make sure I don’t go there when I visit my folks in the fall (after the hell that is mosquito-and-humidity season).

              • Erik Loomis

                Joe Gallina’s

                • The Great God Pan

                  Actual Yelp review:

                  This place was horrible the younger guy behind the counter was very rude and arrogant even called a customer a fat dumb bitch at one point. The food came out burnt and I was charged the wrong price when I brought it up I was yelled at and told that was the price today.

                • jim, some guy in iowa

                  sounds like a trump joint alright, but I suppose not enough gilt

                • Mike Lommler

                  So yeah… I’ll be avoiding that one.

                • Hondo

                  Does the place have a basement?

                • BiloSagdiyev

                  I’ll go buy an assault rifle! Let’s go “investigate”!

          • mattmcirvin

            So they weren’t Andrew Johnson voters, then!

        • BigHank53

          I’ll not have you outsiders trashing the place.

          Springfield is fine. It’s just not a place where I’d bother trying the pizza. Similarly, I know of one place in Vermont that serves a decent barbeque (Curtis’ Ribs, in Putney, for the curious) while it’s impossible to drive more than six miles in North Carolina without passing someone offering pulled pork sandwiches. Hand-lettered signs are an indication of quality!

          • Mike Lommler

            Whoa, don’t misunderstand me here. I don’t have a problem with trashing Springfield. I merely claim first right in such trashing, as with me it comes from a place of genuine, visceral loathing that can only come from being a person drawn to mountains and canyons who is stuck for 18 years growing up in a flat land of corn and soybean fields topped with a fine sprinkling of felonious governors.

            • BigHank53

              Oh, you poor soul. I have actually spent a day and night in Springfield, but unfortunately don’t recall a damn thing about it. It’s…um…it’s really not a good place for a person fond of topography, is it?

              • Mike Lommler

                When I go back to visit the folks I have two overwhelming thoughts. One, I think all that green looks kind of unhealthy (I live in Flagstaff, Arizona now–dry country just looks right). The second is dismay/disgust at Illinois for having failed to grow mountains like a REAL state should have. You couldn’t pay me enough to live east of the Rockies.

                I’ll say this for Springfield: it’s better than Decatur. *shudders*

                • Erik Loomis

                  Drove through Decatur today. It was, uh, not great.

                • Mike Lommler

                  Back in the late 90’s I heard that the city of Decatur had not increased taxes or funding of some sort for education since the Eisenhower administration. Suffice it to say I was glad to be from Springfield at that particular moment. Also, the town smells like burnt pancakes and worse, courtesy of Staley Corporation and Archer Daniels Midland.

                • narciblog

                  *waves from central IL*

                  This is why you should have stopped in Champaign-Urbana. We have any number of tasty restaurants. Plus, the UIUC students aren’t back in town yet, so it’s the quiet season.

                  “Drove through Decatur today. It was, uh, not great.”

                  As we say in Decatur, “That’s the smell of money.”

                • Mike Lommler

                  Black Dog in Urbana has excellent barbecue. The burnt ends, man. I dated a woman in Urbana for a while and we’d go there on cold January days and people were perfectly willing to wait in a line out the door for 40 minutes to get it. Worth every second of waiting.

                • TJ

                  What’s wrong with Chicago? Have you seen our skyline? Beats Grand Junction, CO by country mile.

                • Deborah Bender

                  It just occurred to me that “a country mile” and “a New York minute” are the same kinds of figure of speech.

                • BiloSagdiyev

                  As a native northeasterner who has done al ot of google maps tourism of the western third of the nation lately, I have come to the opposite conclusion. All that brown freaks _me_ out. And there’s so little cover for the sasquatch to retain his privacy.

                • Linnaeus

                  Mountains are nice, but they’re not essential for me at all. I’m also happy with rolling hills, glacial moraines, etc. Lakes and rivers are features I value more.

              • Deborah Bender

                Flat places are better at night. If there isn’t too much light pollution, you can see a lot of constellations.

                • Hogan

                  The elm tree is our highest mountain peak;
                  A five-foot drop a valley, so to speak.

                  A man’s head is an eminence upon
                  A field of barley spread beneath the sun.

                  Horizons have no strangeness to the eye.
                  Our feet are sometimes level with the sky,

                  When we are walking on a treeless plain,
                  With ankles bruised from stubble of the grain.

                  The fields stretch out in long, unbroken rows.
                  We walk aware of what is far and close.

                  Here distance is familiar as a friend.
                  The feud we kept with space comes to an end.

                • Deborah Bender

                  Who wrote that? It’s hard to write a poem that good in rhymed couplets.

                  I spend too much time here for three reasons and one is the quality of the poetry people quote.

                • Hogan

                  Theodore Roethke, “In Praise of Prairie.”

              • TJ

                That’s the whole state!

          • Erik Loomis

            It was really a “I’ve been eating stuff out of my cooler all day and need a hot bite” situation, not a “I need great food” situation.

            • BigHank53

              Fair enough. I find I have better luck on road trips these days with higher-end supermarkets, since they usually have a decent variety of prepared foods. There’s a Kroger near me that does burritos and pizza* and hot sandwiches to order. Wegman’s is ridiculous–I was in one that had three full restaurant counters in it.

              *It’s at least as good as a frozen pizza.

              • cat butler

                Wegman’s is absolutely the best there is. After growing up with them in upstate NY I was ecstatic when they started moving into Philly adjacent areas (they apparently won’t put one in the city for me though).

            • TJ

              That’s why God invented the Big Mac…or here lately the Double Chalupa.

          • BiloSagdiyev

            I was going to make a comment that jolly anthropomorphized pigs running, or even cooking cannibalistically, are also required in the signage, but then I thought, sign? Does Scott’s have a sign?

            https://www.google.com/maps/place/2734+Hemingway+Hwy,+Hemingway,+SC+29554/@33.743331,-79.4772238,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x88ffe72bc38ac16b:0x961659009dea1173!8m2!3d33.743331!4d-79.4750351

            Best BBQ in the Carolinas. Looking at the street view, it looks like they have just recently added a sign. With artwork that does NOT deflect your mind from the reality of meat eating, it’s a whole unbutchered pig over a damned fire. And there’s a missing -ed in the copy, too.

            Anyway, it’s “whole hog” type cooking, over wood from their own woodlot usually, and fresh cardboard is thrown on the floor daily. (Not making that up.)

      • Unemployed_Northeastern

        In fairness, Illinois has better corn than we do in New England.

        • Mike Lommler

          It certainly has corn (soooo much corn). I dunno about better, as I have never had New England corn.

          • Unemployed_Northeastern

            That silver queen corn out there is waaay better than any local corn I’ve had anywhere in New England.

            • BigHank53

              I’ve had excellent corn in New England, but it did come out of our own garden, and there may be some nostalgia involved.

        • TJ

          One thing I’m struck is how good corn is these days. Frozen corn today tastes as good as 1970s peak -of-season fresh corn did.

        • Ahuitzotl

          the corn v porn wars?

      • What about pizza in Chicago?

        • cat butler

          I don’t think they have pizza in Chicago, just old tire rims filled with toppings.

        • Mike Lommler

          Chicago-style is better than St. Louis, but that’s damning with faint praise.

        • Philip

          Deep dish is a perfectly fine food. It’s just not pizza.

    • kvs

      Should’ve had a horseshoe. Real America food.

      https://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Sandwiches/HorseshoeSandwich.htm

      • Mike Lommler

        I might be the only native of Springfield who hates the horseshoe.

      • Erik Loomis

        While I am open to trying local food traditions and don’t much care about the health of the food I eat (I make up for this by eating basically 1 meal most days), the horseshoe looks like not so much an abomination, but a food tradition by people who can’t even get up the energy to create a decent local food tradition.

        • thomas

          But you apparently don’t use ketchup on your fries, don’t eat tuna or chicken salad (mayo), and don’t partake of the perfection that is a Bloody Mary (vodka), so your food opinions are suspect.

        • LNM_in_LA

          Harshing on Skyline? Hey, that’s MY job!

          • Gareth

            Skyline Chili is fine, it just shouldn’t be called chili.

        • BiloSagdiyev

          Next time you’re in Springfield, try the root marm.

        • kvs

          That makes it the most American of food traditions.

      • ScottRS

        Is Cozy Dogs still there?

  • Nathan Goldwag

    Miller also railed against the (((cosmopolitans))), helping to prove once again that my fellow Jews who think they will have a privileged place in the White Christian Republic of America to come are goddamn idiots.

    • Michael

      I’ve seen Glenn Greenwald using the term “globalism” unironically and I just…I just can’t.

    • Philip

      There’s a *word* for the Millers of the world.

  • keta

    My favourite bit of Miller’s crossing today was when Acosta asked if only people from Australia and Great Britain would be allowed in because of the proposed English language requirement and Miller seized on the literal particulars of the question, just like a fucking ten year old, and professed “shock” as he excoriated Acosta for such a “foolish” utterance.

    That Miller would resort to such a childish, dickheaded rebuttal and then go completely off on Acosta shows not only how thin-skinned Miller is, but it also exposes how completely lacking in pertinent data he and his henchheads are in backing up their bullshit contentions and subsequent racist policy suggestions.

    Personally, I’d love to see Miller used more often as spokesforehead because this performance, coupled with his February Trump reach-around, clearly shows how lunatics are considered the “serious thinkers” in the dump known as the White House.

    • Yixing’s Fluffer

      Ideal Acosta follow-up: So it’s this administration’s goal to prioritize Kenyan immigration?

    • Well, ackshually, Miller totes cleaned Acosta’s clock in that briefing.”

    • Unemployed_Northeastern

      Anyone else think that Miller looks like Prince William’s evil American cousin?

      • The Great God Pan

        I think Miller looks like someone whom sex workers, hitchhikers and lost pets should grant a wide berth.

    • TJ

      Heh heh “spokes forehead”…

    • majeff

      Personally, I’d love to see Miller used more often as spokesforehead…

      I wonder what would happen if someone played Indian Love Call in the room with Miller.

  • Hypersphrericalcow

    Wasn’t Georgia the state that had a whole lot of produce wilting in the fields a couple years ago, because they had chased out all the undocumented immigrants, and there were literally not enough workers left to pick everything?

    You’re doing a heck of a job, Perdue.

    • Yixing’s Fluffer

      Who can eat with all the economic anxiety?!

    • Alabama, IIRC.

      • jamespowell

        Both.

    • narciblog

      Not enough workers to pick everything *at undocumented immigrant pay rates.*

  • Denverite

    I’ve said it before, but if you’re in Springfield, the Lincoln tomb and library are musts. The tomb is very solemn but crowded, but at the end of the day, you’re in proximity with Lincoln’s body. Plus the grounds are pretty.

    The library is very kitschy but in a well-done sense. And some of the exhibits are quite interesting, at least from a “popular history” standpoint.

    I’ll be interested to hear your thoughts.

    • efgoldman

      Who’s yer QB in September? Any guesses?

      • Denverite

        No f’ing clue. They both apparently look bad in camp. I’d go with Siemian because the defense is still going to be very good, and all-in on trying to win a bunch of rock fights has won a few teams Super Bowls in the past, but it’s not good either way.

    • Erik Loomis

      Do you really need to question whether I am visiting Lincoln’s grave?

      • efgoldman

        Do you really need to question whether I am visiting Lincoln’s grave

        Do they have decent pizza there?

        • N__B

          Abe was, or so I am told, a fan of pineapple pizza.

        • Joe Paulson

          Obviously, the only place to get good pizza is NYC.

          • Erik Loomis

            Not to mention the groundbreaking addition of butter to rolls!

            • cat butler

              Wait, you can put butter on a roll? Wait until Philadelphia hears about this.

      • Denverite

        Go early to try to avoid the lines. You’ll have a little longer. I didn’t take pictures (felt it would be disrespectful) but it’s a moving setting if you get moved by that sort of thing.

        • “I didn’t take pictures (felt it would be disrespectful)”

          I would never be disrespectful to dead Americans.

          • DrS

            They Shoot Pictures of Dead Horses, Don’t They?

      • TJ

        Can you tell us who’s buried there?

        • BiloSagdiyev

          General Grant.

      • Scott Lemieux

        I have an idea — you could do a whole series of blog posts about the graves of fampus Americans.

  • This is so ugly and depressing.

    • Incontinentia Buttocks

      I'm sure the pizza in Springfield is bad, but it's not that bad!

    • TJ

      Lincoln must be rolling around in his grave.

  • patrick II

    A conservative spokesman on Ari Melber’s show tonight, defending the Justice Department’s new emphasis on discrimination against white applicants, said that Asian students applying to Harvard had one sixteenth the chances as a black student. So, it seems they are trying to pit minority groups against each other and perhaps recover some of the Asian vote they have lost. I doubt if they follow thru on the Asian discrimination problem to elite universities though, sincethct would cost more white student places than you would gain by downsizing black admissions.

    • Unemployed_Northeastern

      The Office of Civil Rights in the Department of Education did an investigation into Harvard’s admissions back in the late 1980s. They found that admitted Asian-American applicants did, in fact, have higher average grades and scores than admitted white applicants… until you removed all of the legacies and recruited athletes from the latter group. Then the stats became identical. Seeing as it was 1989 and third-generation New England blueblood George H.W. Bush was president, the Department of Education concluded that Harvard had vested and legitimate interests in college athletics and nurturing legacy families, so they let it continue.

      Now, the same office investigated about a dozen years of admissions data at Princeton during Obama’s second term; they found zero evidence of anti-Asian-American bias.

      • patrick II

        Thanks. I am glad to be updated. So, assuming that is still true today, and that Asian and white equivalent students chances are equal, does that mean that an African/American also has a sixteen times greater chance of getting in than an equivalent white student? Or, was that conservative spokesman just blowing smoke? (As usual)
        And what is “equivalent” anyway?

        • Unemployed_Northeastern

          Guy was blowing smoke. College admissions is a complex, multivariable process. By “equivalent” he means high school GPA and SAT/ACT scores, as if those were the only criteria colleges use. Or that they are in and of themselves infallible and can be objectively measured.

          • BiloSagdiyev

            Assume a perfectly spherical young white man, with infinitely deep pockets….

        • mattmcirvin

          If that were the case, I would expect the student body at Harvard to look a lot blacker than it does.

      • Philip

        Legacy admissions were designed to keep Jews and Catholics out. Nice to see the Ivy League continue its tradition of getting away with discriminatory crap.

    • Crusty

      Was it volokh conspiracy turd Ilya Shapiro?

      • Unemployed_Northeastern

        I miss when the days when they were still on Disqus. I loved dropping in for a quick troll every now and again.

      • patrick II

        I finally went back and looked. Yest it was Cato Institute’s own Ilya Shapiro. How could you tell from what I wrote?– the made up numbers (a Cato specialty), the attitude? You are pretty good.

    • NewishLawyer

      This has long been a right-wing tactic. Hardly anything new and libertarians and otherwise racist Republicans do seem to use Asian-Americans or Asian-immigrants as the new model minority.

      I don’t think the Harvard statistic is true per se but I’ve heard people complain about how it is harder to get into elite universities if you are Asian for years as a way to bash Affirmative Action. This is hardly a new tactic.

      • TJ

        Most Asians I know will be far more pissed about the immigration policy than pleased about their affirmative action policies.

      • mattmcirvin

        There’s also a subset of “scientific” white supremacists who happily admit that Asians are genetically superior to themselves, as evidence that they’re not racist at all. I imagine if there were a lot more Asians in the US they’d be more threatening to these people.

        • BiloSagdiyev

          And it’s totally illogical, because if they really believed that, they’d be saying, “Well, they outscored us on the IQ test by an average of 3 points, so we must put them in charge of all of our business and government operations. I mean, that’s just racial science. I, for one, welcome our new Asian overlords!”

          • mattmcirvin

            I know some Asian overlords who enjoy taunting them about this.

          • Linnaeus

            One way that they try to get around this conundrum is to make a Goldilocks-style argument, e.g., sure Asians and Asian-Americans might be generally smarter, but they’re too culturally alien to be good leaders, so white folks are “just right” for the job.

            We saw a version of this a few months ago here at LGM when a racist troll showed up and pronounced, among other things, that Asians were turning “our relaxed white high schools” into “pressure cookers” because Asian parents will beat their children if they get Bs on tests and such.

    • mattmcirvin

      This is an old tactic. My impression is that most Asian-Americans haven’t bought it for a long time, if they ever did.

    • Aaron Morrow

      Nowadays, I suspect this tactic is directed more towards racist whites who want to pretend that they aren’t racist.

  • Unemployed_Northeastern

    And beyond the various Trumps’ obvious acceptances into Penn based on academic merit alone, let’s not forget about grand genius Jared Kushner and Harvard:

    “I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, “The Price of Admission.” … My book exposed a grubby secret of American higher education: that the rich buy their under-achieving children’s way into elite universities with massive, tax-deductible donations. It reported that New Jersey real estate developer Charles Kushner had pledged $2.5 million to Harvard University in 1998, not long before his son Jared was admitted to the prestigious Ivy League school. At the time, Harvard accepted about one of every nine applicants. (Nowadays, it only takes one out of twenty.)

    I also quoted administrators at Jared’s high school, who described him as a less than stellar student and expressed dismay at Harvard’s decision.

    “There was no way anybody in the administrative office of the school thought he would on the merits get into Harvard,” a former official at The Frisch School in Paramus, New Jersey, told me. “His GPA did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it. We thought for sure, there was no way this was going to happen. Then, lo and behold, Jared was accepted. It was a little bit disappointing because there were at the time other kids we thought should really get in on the merits, and they did not.

    Although the university often heralded big gifts in press releases or a bulletin called — in a classic example of fundraising wit, “Re:sources” — a search of these outlets came up empty. Harvard didn’t seem eager to be publicly associated with Charles Kushner.

    While looking into Kushner’s taxes, though, federal authorities had subpoenaed records of his charitable giving. I learned that in 1998, when Jared was attending The Frisch School and starting to look at colleges, his father had pledged $2.5 million to Harvard, to be paid in annual installments of $250,000. ”

  • Joe Paulson

    When will Trump have a screening of the fictionalized biopic of his idol, “Tennessee Johnson”?

  • Lee

    More proof that if the Tea Party was government by Talk Radio Host then the Trump Administration is government by Talk Radio Caller

  • Mike in DC

    I wonder what percentage of immigrants between 1870 and 1920 spoke English when they arrived? I’m guessing substantially below 50%. So, basically, at least a plurality of white Americans would not be here if their ancestors had been subject to these proposed immigration rules.

    • Deborah Bender

      To say nothing of the German immigrants who arrived before the Civil War.

      • so-in-so

        They were commies (well, Marxists) and supported the Union (with exceptions) so best not to mention them.

  • kaydenpat

    The White man is so oppressed in this country that it’s unbelievable. It’s only an illusion that they run every dang thing.

  • Jhoosier

    So as long as we’re discussing Midwestern food, I shall be travelling back to Indy later this month, and visiting my brother in Clarksville, TN (I think. Wherever the Army base is) to see the eclipse. Looking for good recommendations, if you have them. I *might* be able to get to Nashville, since a cousin is living there, but I’m at the mercy of my 70ish father with no taste buds.

  • JM

    The interesting thing for me is that when the qualifications are made 1) education and job skills, and 2) English fluency, a large majority of the qualified applicants will be East or South Asian. I’m not sure this is what Erik’s “Trump voter” really wants, particularly since these immigrants will have better employment prospects than he does.

    • Deborah Bender

      And most of them will not be Christians.

    • Paul Thomas

      South Asian is obvious. East, I don’t get. It’s been over a decade since I was there, but nothing in the intervening years has disabused me of my impression that the state of English teaching in Japan and China is fairly dire.

      Are you counting Filipinos as “East Asian”? The Philippines are traditionally considered part of Southeast Asia, not East Asia.

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