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Been a good long time since I have done one of these.

Rolling Stone released a list of the top 100 country artists of all time. Please feel free to complain. The bottom of the list felt like they had to throw all the douche country acts of the last 20 years in, and I suppose you have to take that shit seriously in a list like this, even if it sucks. But the recent stuff is way too overrepresented here. The idea of Roy Acuff at only #66 is completely ridiculous as he was a giant of the genre’s early decades. The entry for him actually says, “Country music as we know it starts with Roy Acuff.” That’s not really true either, but it’s not that far off and it seems to me that said person is probably not #66, one below Billy Joe Shaver, who while fine and all, is no Roy Acuff. On the other hand, I figured it was inevitable that Hank Williams would be #1, and while that would have been a more than acceptable option, I’m glad it was Merle Haggard.

Speaking of lists, building on NPR Top 150 albums by women, here’s a response–the Top 150 worst albums by men!!! There is trolling here–Arcade Fire’s The Suburbs is a great album and I like Sufjan Stevens’ Illinois album a great deal. But it’s still fun.

The life of the middle aged and still (rightfully) bitter rocker: Ted Leo.

John Moreland is simply a wonderful singer and writer.

The fascinating composer Pierre Henry died.

So did Gary DeCarlo, whose “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” has been a plague on the national sports attending consciousness for a very long time. I hope he made a lot of money on it at least.

The important jazz pianist Geri Allen also died, and I’m ashamed to say that I really don’t know her music well.

I saw my 12th Drive-By Truckers show last Saturday at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. The HOF is a terrible museum filled with terrible choices for its honor, especially in recent years (Journey! Green Day! Kiss! Meanwhile, Janet Jackson is nowhere to be found.), but there’s something very pleasant about seeing an outdoor rock show on a humid summer night. It was a really great show. They were supposed to play with the legendary Spooner Oldham, but he was sick so they covered two of the songs he wrote instead: “I’m Your Puppet” and “Cry Like a Baby.” I had seen Oldham play with DBT at a show in Santa Fe in I think 2006 or 2007 so it wasn’t so devastating that he didn’t play with them, but it still would have been great. Anyway, now in their early 50s, Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley still put on a tremendously energetic performance, as does the rest of the band, and with their wonderful songs, at worst at DBT show is going to be good, at best transcendent, and on average, excellent. Hood made a public call for Alex Chilton and Big Star to get in the HOF and they played a good variety of songs from very old (“The Living Bubba”) to about half of the new album and a good range of my favorites mixed in (“Lookout Mountain” “Women Without Whiskey” “Sounds Better in the Song”).

Last month, I saw John Moreland play in Cambridge. It was the 2nd time I had seen him. He was amazing, but I was once again reminded how one idiot in the audience can screw up a show. Unfortunately, a woman sat behind me who had to provide rather loud commentary on his songs. It was just Moreland and his acoustic guitar, so anything can be heard. And this woman, who was not drunk, would comment when he sang one of his amazing lyrics things like “That’s right John!” “Tell it!” “That’s so great.” And everyone in the half of the room I was in could hear her. I am not usually a murderous person, but I was that evening. People who talk at concerts, unconcerned for how their behavior affects those around them, are basically engaging in the selfish and self-centered attitude and actions of Trump voters. Anyway, Will Johnson, formerly of Centro-Matic opened, and he was also good.

Now for some album reviews.

Tacocat, NVM

As I’ve been saying for awhile now, Tacocat is tons of fun. If you like fun poppish punk feminist music, I imagine you will you like Tacocat. If you don’t, I’m sorry to hear that. NVM, from 2014, is excellent and here’s their classic song about menstruation.

A

Angaleena Presley, Wrangled

Presley’s previous album, American Middle Class, was a pretty outstanding set of country songs that took seriously the hardships of the small towns of the South, even if I had a problem with her construction of class and the racial undertones underneath it. Her new album is very solid, but not quite up to the level of the last, particularly in terms of ambition. There are some songs along the same lines, such as “High School.” There’s a song mocking bro-country, which also includes a guest appearance by the hip hop artist Yellawolf. I’m not sure it works that well, but it’s better than the usual mashup of the two genres. She’s an important talent and has attracted a lot of attention from the living legends, co-writing songs with the now recently deceased Guy Clark, as well as Wanda Jackson. There is much to like here, even if it isn’t a truly epic album.

B+

Lucinda Williams, Ghosts of Highway 20

There is one reason to listen to this album: the great band. Bill Frisell and Greg Leisz are both fantastic here. But Lucinda is not. Her voice has lost much of what made it so wonderful and it feels like she is singing through mush, often making it hard to understand. Moreover, why are all these songs 5 and 6 minutes and even 9 minutes long? She doesn’t have that much to say to justify these overlong songs. The best song is “Dust,” which turns out to be an adaptation of a poem by her father Miller Williams. Appropriate, because the songwriting isn’t so great here.

C+

Kendrick Lamar, To Pimp a Butterfly

Yeah, yeah, I know. Everyone has heard this album but me. But in my quest to catch up on hip hop (which has gone far enough that it’s started annoying my wife), I am diligently working through albums I need to hear. And, yep, this pretty much lives up to the hype. Great songs, great social message, great backing musicians. A truly epic album.

A+

Valerie June, The Order of Time

The extent to which one likes Valerie June probably depends quite a bit on her voice. I saw her open for Sturgill Simpson last year and she was unexpected–a small African-American woman singing her version of country Americana in a high, off-kilter voice to an audience of perhaps 100% white people. I found the music OK and the voice a little off-putting. Listening to her new album, I’d go a bit farther and say the voice seems less odd, but the music and songs are mostly not all that interesting. I do very much like the closer “Got Soul.” And there’s certainly nothing objectionable here, but neither does it move me.

B

Hanoi Masters: War is a Wound, Peace is a Scar

This is a really great 2010 recording of old Vietnamese musicians doing traditional songs as their nation changes and time passes from the Vietnam War. Some are from the war era, some are not, all are quite touching. Here’s a nice piece on the making of the album.

A

Golden Dawn Arkestra, Stargazer

Despite the reference to Sun Ra and the visual tribute as can be seen in the performance below, this feels more like a modern, more jam oriented Mandrill album. It’s an alright effort in the funk-jam genre. Fun, maybe not life-changing.

B

Kamasi Washington, The Epic

This album was enormous popular upon its release in 2015. For this reason, it’s important. It’s popularity rested mostly on the fact that Kendrick Lamar is a fan and he was on To Pimp a Butterfly. So this opened up a lot of hip hop fans to jazz. Great! But for a long-time jazz listener, this is not a great album. There are some really good cuts. But the album has a ton of filler. That’s almost impossible to avoid in a nearly three hour album. There’s a reason very few albums are 3 hours. But this should be a 70 minute album. Take the first disc. The first two cuts are pretty good, if clearly an homage to some pretty standard icons (late era Coltrane, 70s era Miles, and Pharoah Sanders). But the rest of the disc fades to background music. I’ve heard from friends that he puts on a great live show and he’s a talented guy, but this does not break new ground and is way, way too long.

B-

Mavis Staples, Livin’ On a High Note

This is a perfectly acceptable late career album. Her voice is still pretty strong. The songs aren’t all that great by and large, despite being written by some of the finest songwriters working today. Still, there’s plenty of hope and inspiration here. It’s not peak Staples, but it’s the album I was listening to as the health care bill went down and so at least got me through that.

B

Paul Simon, Stranger to Stranger

Simon has had an odd career. His early work with Art Garfunkel was fairly groundbreaking. Then he went into a long, sleepy solo career with not a whole lot of good albums. Then he made Graceland, one of the greatest albums ever released. And then he released a bunch more bad to mediocre albums. Stranger to Stranger is among the better of those albums, but it’s still not really all that interesting. Simon does have some fairly active arrangements here, which is a nice change from albums that tend to become repetitive and boring. But the songs aren’t all that special and he’s just not an exciting singer. The reviews for this album fell squarely into the “every mediocre Woody Allen movie is his big comeback” category, reliving his career and noting this is a good album. It’s possible that repeated listens would make me appreciate more the lyrical content, but it’s hard to see investing the time in something that, at best, is going to be a rare listen.

C+

Connections, Midnight Run

Leaving aside the question of whether the Columbus rock scene is big enough to have a supergroup, Connections is supposed to be a super group of Columbus rockers that formed in 2012. Their 2016 album is my first experience with the band and it is pretty impressive. This is some very good rock and roll, of the kind we need more of. Good groove, good sound, good conception. My one hesitation here is that I really dislike how low the vocals are in the mix, making them almost a backing instrument when I want to hear the words, especially for an album with pretty catchy music.

B+

Forma, Physicalist

I made another of my occasional forays into electronic ambient music. As usual, it was a mistake. I suppose I could see listening to this if I wanted background music while writing. But I never want background music. As so often with this sort of music, it’s incredibly repetitive. Maybe you are saying, “why even bother listening to this music if you don’t like it.” And the answer is that I always want to keep trying. But maybe I am never going to get over my disdain for this synthesizer driven ambience.

C

Herbie Mann, Live at the Whiskey A Go Go,

This is an alright 1968 album by the famed flutist. I have to admit that flute is not my favorite jazz instrument and that’s probably getting in the way of a higher rating. But there are some other issues here as well, particularly that Sonny Sharrock’s noise guitar doesn’t work that well here. For most of the album, he’s really in the background, way more than you would expect from him. And then when he shreds, at the very end of the second side, it’s out of place with the rest of the album. Overall, it’s a fine if minor fusion album.

B

Buddy Miller, Universal United House of Prayer

I’ve heard nothing but great things about this album since its 2004 release. I don’t know why I never listened to it. But it is indeed a really strong country gospel album. It proves that the genre doesn’t need to be maudlin and it doesn’t need to be fundamentalist or right wing. Miller and his backing singers have excellent voices. Miller is a fine songwriter (often working with his wife Julie, who also sings here), and the covers of The Louvin Brothers’ “There’s a Higher Power” and Dylan’s “With God On Our Side” are really great.

A

Pharoah Sanders, Message from Home

I’d never really paid attention to Sanders’ work after the 1970s. This 1996 album is a comeback of sorts, both helped and hindered by Bill Laswell’s production during the period when he was producing like 8000 albums a year, all around his own version of fusion world music. There are moments in here where Sanders really brings the intensity that made him famous, but there are some real lulls in here as well. Laswell’s popping bass gets pretty annoying and there are some cheesy 90s production techniques too. The highlight of the album is “Kumba” which features the great Foday Musa Suso, but then the song is almost all Suso, which says something about the entirety of this project.

B-

As always, this is an open thread on all things music.

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  • BaronvonRaschke

    Haggard ahead of Hank? Really? Ahead of Willie or the great Johnny Cash? Really? Really? Oy.

    • Erik Loomis

      I don’t see any way you can make an argument for Willie or Cash over Haggard, if for no other reason than the vast majority of Cash’s great songs came in about a 5 year period and Willie truly only has a few great albums, whereas Haggard was chugging out amazing work for a very long time.

      • BaronvonRaschke

        You are right when it comes to Willie, and I stand corrected. As for Cash, you are right that his best stuff came within a few years while Merle kept chugging on. For me, Cash’s highs were higher than Merle’s, so I would rate him higher, but that is a quibble. It comes down to whether your prefer Pedro Martinez or Don Sutton. Sutton had a longer and more consistent career, but Pedro had arguably one or two f the best years ever for a pitcher. I’d prefer Pedro, but I cannot argue with Sutton either.

      • stepped pyramids

        For me, I like Willie’s voice and his band so much there’s really no competition, but that’s a personal preference.

        • BaronvonRaschke

          Me too, but “objectively,” Mr. Loomis is right about Willie.

          • NobodySpecial

            I only argue that Willie also had a tremendous influence as a songwriter long before he had a career as an artist, and that has to count for something.

            • BaronvonRaschke

              Yes, and he should get lots of props for making it outside Nashville and its hoary system that rejected him at first. The same goes for Waylon and others.

            • Erik Loomis

              Oh of course. He’s a top 10 all time great.

              • Mutaman

                Nobody ever had a backing band like The Stangers- Roy Nichols, James Burton, and the incomparable Ralph Mooney.

          • stepped pyramids

            I don’t think anything close to an objective ranking is possible. At least, not one that would be particularly interesting or useful.

      • Drew

        Cash had the aesthetic down which results in him being relatively overrated.

        • Erik Loomis

          Yes, this is a huge part of Cash’s modern reputation.

        • stepped pyramids

          I don’t see how you can separate a popular artist’s aesthetic from their relative “greatness”. Charisma and/or presentation are as much a part of the nature of being an entertainer as being a skilled performer.

      • clay

        the vast majority of Cash’s great songs came in about a 5 year period

        Whoa there, pardner. I assume you’re referring to the Sun Records years in the late 50s, but the live prison records were in the late 60s, and the American recordings lasted almost a decade, with several posthumous releases.

        It’s not like he coasted for 40 years on the Sun stuff. (I.e., he’s not Jerry Lee Lewis.)

        Besides, no Cash means no Haggard.

        • I don’t think the American albums are all that good, albeit they are better than the total crap he had put out in the 20 years prior.

    • Downpup E

      Haggard could imitate people better than they could do themselves
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4V3S7kGNjY

    • nixnutz

      If I were going to be annoyed by anything it would be the absence of Brenda Lee, it’s Rolling Stone so I’m more pleased that Faron Young made the list at all than bothered by the fact that he’s way behind Gram fucking Parsons which is also offset by the fact they put Miranda Lambert above him because this is bullshit from people with minimal interest in country music.

      • BaronvonRaschke

        Cannot argue with anything you wrote. I did not realize until you pointed it out that Brenda Lee was left off. I love Faron Young too, and you are right that he is way too low. Most of all, you nailed it when you said “this is bullshit from people with minimal interest in country music.” True that.

    • HugeEuge

      There’s no arguing with taste but there sure as hell is arguing with lack of taste and George Jones ahead of Jimmie Rodgers and Dolly Parton ahead of Patsy Cline is definitely the latter. No disrespect to either Jones or Parton but fuck me, Stravinsky is not better or more important than Bach.

      • Spot Letton

        Not so much lack of taste, I think, since both George Jones and Dolly Parton are pretty great, but poor judgment: Jimmie Rodgers and Patsy Cline are titans and Dolly and George are mere gods.

        • HugeEuge

          I accept that correction, is more or less what I had in mind by calling them Stravinsky to Jimmie and Patsy’s Bach.

          • Mutaman

            I thought George was too low. Sinatra calls him “The second greatest singer of the 20th century”. Christgau has him as a top 5 singer.

        • twbb

          Didn’t the Titans lose out to the gods?

      • BaronvonRaschke

        No argument here. Rodgers was a titan, and there is no good argument for ranking Parton ahead of Patsy Cline. (I thought that Parton was too high on the list in absolute terms.) There may be a recency bias to those missteps.

  • Can’t say I agree with the assessment of Paul Simon’s solo career. He’s done many good albums, Graceland is excellent but I’m not sure it’s one of the best of all times, and I think his previous, “So Beautiful or So What”, is mostly excellent although it loses momentum towards the end. But “Stranger to Stranger” is odd. I’ve listened to it a few times since it came out and although the textures are interesting the songs aren’t all that memorable, by and large.

    • Johnnie

      Yeah, I don’t get this, self-titled, “Here Comes Rhyming Simon” and “Still Crazy After All These Years” are all phenomenal records. “Rhythm of the Saints” has got some really good tracks too, even if it’s uneven.

      • I guess I understand why some people might find “Saints” a dull listen overall, although I’ve never been one of them.

        • Just_Dropping_By

          I think it’s mostly because there was no way anything following Graceland wouldn’t seem like a letdown.

      • Thomas W

        I really like Rhythm of the Saints.

        • Cheap Wino

          Rhythm of the Saints is his best album. Graceland is classic but RotS is sublimely brilliant. Simon’s amazing voice with his beautiful, compelling melodies combines with the African rhythms so phenomenally well. Graceland touched on it and has some legitimately fantastic tunes but Rhythm of the Saints perfected it. It was the album he was always meant to make.

          I always wonder why it is that the Garfunkel period gets so overrated. Sure, there was some okay stuff, the boxer is a good tune etc., but compared to what else was going on in music at the time they were pedestrian. And Bridge Over Troubled Waters is first ballot hall of fame inductee in the how did this terrible, annoying song get popular category.

          • dn

            I think Graceland is better and completely deserves the “one of the best ever” accolades it has received – literally every song on it is worthy of being a single and it still hangs together as a whole. But Saints is also great – less accessible and less consistent, but better-produced and with its share of stone classics like “Obvious Child” and “The Coast”.

            S&G had some good stuff – Bookends is a genuinely excellent album – but God yes they are overrated. Christgau had them pegged – Garfunkel really doesn’t add that much to Simon’s singing, Simon’s writing was still pretty immature, and their body of work as a whole just doesn’t measure up to what any number of other artists were doing at the time. They were very “respectable” though – white, collegiate, folkies, not too dangerous even when they grew their hair out, and I’d guess that contributed to their popularity.

            • Scott Lemieux

              “Further to Fly,” too.

          • Scott Lemieux

            ROTS isn’t as consistent and deep as Graceland, but its strongest songs are sublime.

    • twbb

      “Graceland is excellent but I’m not sure it’s one of the best of all times”

      You are objectively wrong.

  • There is indeed a lot of trolling on that “Worst by Men” list : Sgt Pepper’s? Yankee Hotel Foxtrot?

    • Johnnie

      Spiderland!?!

      • The Great God Pan

        That was where I checked out, especially since they didn’t include any explanations. There’s contrarianism and then there’s lazy contrarianism.

    • I know that Miles Davis’ Doo-Bop is one of his weaker albums – IIRC a good deal of it was made public posthumously – but not “bottom 150” material.

      And while I – as a cis-male twenty-something – cosign the placement of Relapse on said list, I’m still baffled that Encore isn’t at least tied with it, much less failing to get a mention altogether. The whole “well ACKSHUALLY, Encore IS Eminem’s It Was Written” argument has been fairly popular the past few years, but doesn’t really have anything going for it other than being oh-so-counterintuitive: The beats suck (even more so than a usual Eminem album), the humor is much more juvenile, and worst of all the technical skills and focus are shot to shit – Encore might have a select few songs better than most of Relapse (4), but the bad stuff on the former (which is the overwhelming majority) is fucking unlistenable.

    • Of course a lot of these “Worst of ” lists are going to feature well-known artists who, inevitably, have either released lesser works or works that the compiler thinks are “overrated” and need to knocked down a peg and hey, it’s a good way to troll fans, which is pretty much the whole point anyway. Piece of cake, as long as you don’t mind getting hate mail. Some music fans have no sense of humour.

    • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

      I think it was kinda echoing that article from The Toast about [para.] “Books All White Men Love”

  • To be fair to DeCarlo, “Kiss Him Goodbye” was an intentionally terrible B-side that they hated, albeit one that inexplicably became a pop-culture fixture.

    As for To Pimp a Butterfly, I find it one of the best albums I probably won’t listen to in to entirety on a regular basis – not just because of my attention span, but because most of the album cuts lend themselves much more conducive to sequential listening.

  • Downpup E

    Cash, Wagoner, Stuart, Williams at a place like LGM-
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FKs02ngHxY

  • Bootsie

    My grandma’s getting me tickets to see Willie at Jones Beach in September.

    My mom expressly said that this will probably be the last chance I get to see him.

  • Murc

    Journey, Green Day, and Kiss abso-fucking-lutely belong in any rock and roll hall of fame.

    I don’t know enough about Janet Jackson to comment.

    • Denverite

      Journey, Green Day, and Kiss abso-fucking-lutely belong in any rock and roll hall of fame.

      Uh, yeah. Green Day’s “American Idiot” is on the shortlist for best albums of the aughts. Whether they or Radiohead is the best group of the 90s/00s is an interesting debate.

      • Drew

        American Idiot? Really? That album is very much a product of its time. It came out when I was in high school and I loved it then but it does not hold up well at all.

        Radiohead is probably better. Although Green Day’s 90s output is very solid. All of their albums after Warning suck though. Dookie holds up. Nimrod holds up. American Idiot does not.

        • Veleda_k

          And you are entitled to that opinion.

          • jackrabbitslim

            And I endorse his opinion. American Idiot is wildly overrated. Dookie, on the other hand, is an absolute gem of a record.

            • stepped pyramids

              Green Day was great at pop-punk and then went on to be vaguely OK at imitating Bruce Springsteen.

        • tsam100

          It’s also a masterful middle finger at W. All musicians who went after that asshole deserve some credit. It holds up just fine for me, but I actually DID listen to the 80s punk and came to terms with the fact that it was going to turn into pop music sooner or later. Everything does. Being sneery and snobby about it doesn’t change it, it just ignites authenticity wars that have no value.

          • Cheap Wino

            Exactly. Punk was always going to be subsumed by pop at some point. Green Day were the first to “perfect” the inevitable (for lack of a better word). Whether that makes them HOF-worthy is a matter of debate. While their music can be entertaining it’ll never have the visceral effect that X or the Dead Kennedy’s does. To what degree is the HOF a popularity contest versus a groundbreaking talent contest?

            • tsam100

              Even at its peak, punk had lots of gimmicky crap, some super terrible people (Fear, for example), and it also became attractive to new-nazis. Some bands really were a complete joke. But there was enough there to catch the attention of people who wanted to be famous, so they made it palatable to people who weren’t just angsty teens. So while Green Day won’t have quite the same visceral effect that DK did, Green Day also learned how to viciously attack a shit like GWB. Being as popular as it was got the message to millions instead thousands.

              • Cheap Wino

                Oh yeah, there was lots of terrible, awful punk. I never could figure out if Fear was supposed to be a parody or were they serious. But of all the ways people took punk Green Day’s was the easiest, didn’t take much creativity. That’s not to criticize, more to point out that there were a lot of much better bands that took punk in much more interesting directions. Sebadoh, Husker Du, Minutemen, Meat Puppets, et. al., were all doing something new. Creating their own sound.

        • witlesschum

          Frankly, you’re too kind to Nimrod, which I don’t like outside of about four songs. But I’d be perfectly fine to never hear American Idiot again. Pointless, gutless, soulless music.

        • dn

          American Idiot embodies everything I find most annoying about college-town liberalism, which is the kind of liberalism I grew up around. I also was in high school when it came out, it was ubiquitous, and I never understood why – although I do appreciate that it helped turn some of my younger cousins from Scott Walker-land into decent liberals, so I guess there’s that.

          Mostly, I’ve just never been able to get over how obvious a knock-off of Quadrophenia it is, only without most of the stuff that made Q a masterpiece (I got into the Who around the same time and this was obvious to me in 2006). There isn’t a single song on American Idiot that can measure up to, say, “The Dirty Jobs”.

      • wjts

        Whether they or Radiohead is the best group of the 90s/00s is an interesting debate.

        In the sense of whether Highlander 2: The Quickening or The Love Guru is the best movie of the 90s/00s is an interesting debate.

        • Robbert

          I love that comment so much, I want to take it out to an ATDI concert.

        • jackrabbitslim

          The Pop-Punkening.

    • Erik Loomis

      If you think Journey and Kiss belong in the HOF, might I suggest putting your head in a paper bag before walking outside.

      • nixnutz

        If you think of it as a history museum I think Kiss has a place, just as I expect history books not to ignore the Trump presidency. One of the worst bands ever but hugely influential, in an entirely negative way. Journey I like quite a bit but I don’t see how they qualify. And Green Day’s not a terrible band but making room for Dax Shepard on Mt. Rushmore would make about as much sense.

        • I don’t care for any of those bands but I also don’t know what the criteria are for inclusion in that hallowed hall. It is fun to watch video footage of the induction and acceptance speeches, though. Mike Love’s speech in 1988 when the Beach Boys were inducted is possibly the most infamous.

        • postmodulator

          Kiss was so many 13-year-old’s favorite band for so many years that they clearly belong in the HOF if anyone does. I never liked them, but I never liked Rush, except for one or two moments here and there, and I’d make the same argument about them. They’re too important not to be in.

          But Journey.

          But Journey.

          I went to high school in Akron. Northeast Ohio is maybe the “classic rock” capital of the world. My friends would torture me by playing “Seperate Ways” in situations I couldn’t escape, sneak it on to mix tapes, things like that. I hate Journey. I hate Steve Perry’s voice and I hate Neal Schon’s little pretend-guitar-hero twiddlings — no one musician has ever gotten more out of worse playing. Maybe CC DeVille comes close. But that’s all right, right? You can always move away from your shithole small town and escape that.

          Then came the Sopranos finale.

          I haven’t lived a virtuous life, in some ways. My karma caught up to me after the Sopranos finale. All of a sudden Journey was one of the great bands of all time, and they were totally inescapable, and everyone loves “Don’t Stop Believing,” and it’s the official white people anthem, along with “Wonderwall.”

          Be kind to people. Live temperately and chastely. I didn’t, and for my sins I’m living through the Journey revival.

          • Colin Snider

            I also went to high school in Akron (Firestone), and you’re not wrong about that classic rock thing. It is to radio there what country is to radio in the South – inescapable, and way too oversaturated.

            • Jon Hendry

              A lot of the north/northeast suffers from the classic rock thing. I grew up in central Connecticut, and it was pretty much the same. It was a revelation when I went to college in Philadelphia and discovered WXPN.

          • Sentient AI From The Future

            I will choose a bathysphere
            I will choose free will

          • M Lister

            But Journey did have its own Atari video game. How many other bands have that? (I played it, and may have even owned it, though I am not sure. I am sure that I never understood it, or what it had to do with the band.)

          • Just_Dropping_By

            it’s the official white people anthem, along with “Wonderwall”

            You mean the Paul Anka version of “Wonderwall,” right?

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCI27zi30nc

          • jim, some guy in iowa

            my town was the last overnight on this year’s RAGBRAI and for entertainment someone came up with the idea of having a Hairball concert. Hairball, who I had never before heard of, is a serious 80s cover band who have several singers portraying David Lee Roth, Brian Johnson, Axl Rose, etc. They apparently have quite a following in the upper midwest and people were really looking forward to the show- it drew a hell of a crowd

            boring story short, they now have a Journey segment with a Steve Perry impersonator, long straight black hair and white swallowtail coat. When they got to “Lovin Touchin Squeezin” or whatever that song is, I looked around and it seemed that nearly every woman in the audience was singing along. Makes me wonder, is *that* what makes Journey not rock and roll?

            I’ll save my new pet theory that classic rock and modern country are just different dishes of comfort food that white people eat to forget about everybody else for another time

          • Cheap Wino

            Journey and Foreigner drove me away from popular music (thank you!). They both suck terribly — they’re the result of arena rock which always sucked. And I was horrified at the Sopranos finale. I’ve always hate, hate, hated that tune.

          • dn

            I admit to being fond of the guitar solo from “Lights”. Shameful, I know. Otherwise I can pretty much do without Journey.

      • Murc

        You can make an argument that Journey shouldn’t be in there. I don’t see how you can argue that Kiss shouldn’t be in there.

        • Erik Loomis

          Because Kiss fucking sucks?

          • Murc

            What’s that got to do with anything? Half the bands in there suck.

            • Yes, the Rock and Roll HOF is an abomination.

              • Judas Peckerwood

                The whole idea of a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is an abomination.

                • witlesschum

                  It’s gross and stupid. Steve Miller has them pegged, of all people.

            • Judas Peckerwood

              Half?

          • Bloix

            It’s not just that they fucking suck. it’s that they’re so cynical about fucking sucking.

          • Jon Hendry

            I’d allow them to be inducted just for putting the makeup back on. They ugly.

      • howard

        i’m no fan of music “halls of fame” in the first place, but if there is one music that truly doesn’t need a hall of fame, it’s rock music, whose basic energy is in total opposition to the kind of bourgeois institution that a “hall of fame” perforce must be.

        which is to say, i have yet to care for one second who is and isn’t in the rock and roll hall of fame….

        • Jon Hendry

          A HOF is such a Baby Boomer thing to do.

      • Jon Hendry

        KISS could be the branding on a bumper car ride attached to the HOF.

      • tsam100

        Well–the HOF seems to be more about fame than anything else. Journey and KISS are undeniably famous, despite being annoying as all fuck. Especially KISS.

  • Denverite

    The fact that women consist of five of the top 30 performers (six if you count the Carter family as “female”) says all you need to know about country music or the RS music critics. I’m just not sure which.

    (Seriously, though, Emmylou and Lucinda are fucking disrespected on there.)

    • Thlayli

      No problem with which women made the top ten (Lynn, Carters, Parton), but IMO the order is wrong — Parton should be first.

      The Tammy Wynette blurb didn’t mention her KLF collab.

      • wjts

        Mine’s a 99.

  • Johnnie

    The list is pretty strange, but I am still very jealous that one of my college friends got to write the Steve Earle entry.

    • Jon Hendry

      BTW, for anyone who does music stuff, Steve Earle has a songwriting camp called Camp Copperhead.

      Former(?) blogger Jim Henley went this year.

  • Colin Snider

    For ambient, I’d strongly encourage Aphex Twin’s “Selected Ambient Works,” volume 1 AND 2. They’re great entry points, and Vol. 2 in particular is especially impressive in its tones when on headphones (or really good speakers). Boards of Canada’s “Music has the right to children” is also amazing and unlike anything else, and well worth the time.

    • Marduk Kur

      Boards of Canada is the greatest electronic band in the history of ever.

      Music Has the Right to Children

      Geogaddi

      The Campfire Headphase

      Tomorrow’s Harvest

      • twbb

        I went through a Boards of Canada phase where I got a bunch of the albums but I kind of lost interest after a while, in a way that never happened with most other ambient artists I listen to, for some reason.

        • Marduk Kur

          Odd, because BOC is the only band of that style that’s never lost my interest. There’s just so much detail that I can always seem to find something new. And unlike so much electronic music it never sounds sterile.

    • postmodulator

      Cosign both those recommendations — also No Pussyfooting and Fripp’s 90s solo recordings. I like the first and fourth Eno ambient records too. Also Lowercase Noises. I perform live ambient guitar improvs at clubs sometimes. You get interesting reactions, about two-thirds of people check out and one-third seem to get really into it.

    • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

      Agreed. If you don’t know it already, Drone Zone on Soma.fm is an amazing ambient channel. Almost never a bad track.

  • Denverite

    Also, am I the only one who thinks the Avett Brothers kind of got screwed here?

    • Spot Letton

      Well, lots lots lots more influential, for sure, and I love me some Avett Brothers.

      • Hogan

        But “influential” should move Acuff way up the list.

        • Spot Letton

          That’s for damn sure. Can’t believe he’s so low. They could have called the whole damn list the Roy Acuff Memorial List.

    • The Avett Brothers are bullshit.

  • Might not be in your wheelhouse, Erik, but Albert “Prodigy” Johnson of Mobb Deep died at 42 last month from sickle-cell complications; a brief overview of his discography is provided in this blog post’s comment section.

  • Jason K.

    I don’t really keep up with popular music, so the first time I ever heard of Kendrick Lamar was when his video “Humble” popped up in my recommended videos on YouTube one night. For some reason I clicked the link. The video ended up blowing me away and I became an instant fan. I also really, really like “i.”

    • Dr. Waffle

      Just saw him live in Boston. He’s every bit as great in person as he is in the studio. He’s going to go down as the greatest rapper of his generation, without a doubt.

    • Nick Conway

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glaG64Ao7sM

      Element video is great too, it wasn’t one of my favorite songs when I first listened to the album but the video gave me a new appreciation of it.

      In general, although it’s less ambitious, I like DAMN more than To Pimp a Butterfly. It’s more of a crowd-pleaser, you’ve got Humble, Loyalty, Love, which are all bangers with top-40 ambitions (Humble is his first #1 hit) that are also super high-quality.

      With DAMN he’s now had three albums in a row that are all-time greats, each with a completely different feel.

    • Cheap Wino

      His performance of i on SNL was absolutely phenomenal. Better than the studio version. Unbelievable tune and the musicianship on display on that stage is off the charts.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sop2V_MREEI

  • Uncle_Ebeneezer

    I will just say don’t trust Erik’s take on The Epic. Listen to it for your self. It could maybe be trimmed by 3-5 songs. Numerous amazing songs and the playing is ridiculous by pretty much every band- member. I can’t think of the last time a jazz album featured 2 drummers, upright and electric bass, piano and electronic keys, a turntable, 2 horns, lead Vox, a choir and strings and best sounded entirely seamless. So for me, that’s breaking some pretty major ground. And that cover of Au Claire De Lune is one of the most interesting jazz takes on a non-jazz song I’ve heard in a LOOOONNNNGGG time.

    One thing he is right on: KW and the band are incredible live. Here’s a couple good ones.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgSlFFBUOSI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrcoUKohf6k

    • Erik Loomis

      Out of curiosity, how much modern, envelope-pushing jazz do you listen to?

      • Uncle_Ebeneezer

        Define envelope-pushing. Scofield, Christian Scott, Brad Mehldau, Rosenwinkel, KW, Cameron Graves, Josh Redman, Bad Plus, Loka, Guillermo Klein Y Los Gauchos, those are some of my faves. All of them push envelopes at times though they aren’t always about trying to do that. I don’t think the key selling point of The Epic is in trying to break new ground (that would be more To Pimp A Butterfly) I just think it’s great because most of the songs are excellent and it is done in a huge sound way.

      • howard

        since i more or less never listen to albums beginnning to end, but instead as parts of larger playlists in shuffle mode, the fact that here’s some padding on the epic doesn’t bother me in the slightest, particularly when you consider the number of new listeners washington brought in.

        i continue to be amazed, though, that the mccoy tyner band with azar lawrence would turn out to be so influential 45 years later….

  • NobodySpecial

    If this comment is duplicated, sorry, the post just disappeared on my end.

    Anyways, there’s new Nine Inch Nails tracks out, and one of them is a gorgeous tribute to Bowie.

    https://youtu.be/_g8nAqDu3gI

    • Deborah Bender

      Not enough pixels on my screen to read the labels after the camera starts pulling back.

  • Spot Letton

    Holy shit! Journey’s in the Rock HOF and Alex Chilton/Big Star arent? I am never fucking going to Cleveland.

    • NobodySpecial

      That was the correct response even before the built the Hall.

      • Spot Letton

        True dat.

    • Erik Loomis

      You know who else isn’t in there? Sonic Youth. The Replacements. The Cure. Ice-T. Etc. But Journey and Kiss, sure! Their constant play on classic rock radio makes Baby Boomers feel nostalgic. I assume Jethro Tull is next.

      • Spot Letton

        Replacements and Sonic Youth too? Jeez, make that the entire Midwest I am never fucking going to. I do happen to be a boomer, but the constant airplay on classic rock radio makes me want to put “Sorry Ma Forgot to Take Out the Trash” on the turntable and turn it up loud enough to break windows,

        • wjts

          Replacements… too? Jeez, make that the entire Midwest I am never fucking going to.

          You do know what city the Replacements came out of, right?

          • Mutaman

            Muddy, Little Walter, Dylan, Orson Welles, Bo Diddley, and James Dean all came out of the midwest.

            • AlanInSF

              I jest. Joe Walsh is pretty good too

              • AlanInSF

                Forgot that I’m on a different device. Spot’s my alias.

          • AlanInSF

            Absolutely right. Just that as a coastal guy I always thought of Minneapolis as lower Scandinavia rather than the Midwest

      • Joseph Slater

        I like Jethro Tull a lot. Well, mostly their 70s stuff, but that stuff was great. They are way more deserving of being in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame than many bands already in it.

        • Erik Loomis

          I will grant that Stand Up is a very good album and Aqualung a solid one. After that, I don’t know I can go there….

          • Joseph Slater

            First, let me stipulate that the R&R HoF criteria are all sorts of unclear, and it’s all subjective. Having said that, “Aqualung” was one of the great rock and roll albums of the 1970s and arguably of all time; further, “Thick as a Brick” was both very popular and extremely interesting musically. Unlike some prog rock — well, most prog rock not done by Peter Gabriel-era Genesis — “Thick as a Brick” stands up (see what I did there?) really well over time. On the strength of those two albums alone, Tull should be in. Plus I agree that “Stand Up” was at least very good, and, in the pre-“Aqualung” era, “Benefit” and “Living in the Past” were more than solid. Beyond that, I grant you “A Passion Play” got killed by the critics, but I think it’s underrated. The mid-70s stuff (“War Child,” “Minstrel in the Gallery” and “Too Old to Rock ‘n’ Roll, Too Young to Die”) were all uneven, but each of those albums had several songs better than anything that, say, Journey or Kiss ever did. “Songs from the Wood” is excellent. “Heavy Horses” and “Stormwatch” had good stuff on them. Throughout this era, they were also a kick-ass band live. The 80s output is more uneven, but again, was better than, say, Journey or Kiss, or some other bands in the Hall. I know they have, for a long time, been the opposite of a critics’-darling band, but for a number of years at least in the early 70s they managed to be both very popular and make innovative, interesting music. And I say this as someone who, musically, does not spend all or even most of my time living in the past.

            • You s

              • Joseph Slater

                Thanks. I felt a bit guilty about being so long-winded, but I think Tull is terribly under-appreciated.

      • Mutaman

        No Marc Bolen. No Zevon???

      • Thom

        “But Journey and Kiss, sure! Their constant play on classic rock radio makes Baby Boomers feel nostalgic.”

        I know you love this idea, but as a mid-period Baby Boomer, I cannot name or recognize any song by Kiss, and only one by Journey. Nobody I knew had records by either of these bands.

  • Lt. Fred

    As good or bad as the album may be, I just cannot agree that Paul Simon is a dull singer. His voice is almost his greatest asset, even above his songwriting in my view.

  • Mr__Neutron

    I wish Porter Wagoner had been higher up but I’m glad he’s at least is in the top 50. The write-up doesn’t mention Porter’s greatest achievement, his psychotronic country songs–“The Rubber Room” compilation is a scarifying smorgasbord of suicide, murder, alcoholism, poverty, madness, and child abuse.
    Charlie Rich also should have been higher up but I bet his ghost is glad John Denver’s at the bottom.

    • Spot Letton

      His ghost would tear out John Denver’s throat for even being on the same list with him.

    • osceola

      About that, Mr. Neutron, here’s a reminder for LGM readers unaware of the incident. Charlie’s drunker’n shit and everybody in the audience shots are whispering that to each other.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGkbdLsBRrY

      PS, In the audience shots, Conway Twitty’s sideburns are cool, man.

      • Spot Letton

        Wow, what a moment. They just don’t make television like that anymore. Or suits.

      • tsam100

        Dude’s smoking a fucking cigarette on stage.

    • jim, some guy in iowa
    • Mutaman

      Charlie should have been a lot higher.

  • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

    A lot of Paul Simon’s 70s stuff is pretty bland fare aimed at moving units and winning Grammies (“Still Crazy After All These Years” was Ur-Yacht Rock) but a lot of people think “Kodachrome” is the perfect pop song (they’re wrong but not far off; it’s “Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard’).

    • Deborah Bender

      “Me and Julio” is catchy but it’s Simon trying to be a different ethnicity, and “The Boxer” is Simon trying to be a different class and being condescending. “To Look for America” or whatever it’s called is authentic, on the verge of sentimentality but doesn’t cross the line, and I like it.

      My favorite rock, or maybe pop, song has always been “Brown Eyed Girl” and it still seems perfect to me. But I don’t intentionally listen to pop music any more, so I may have missed something better.

      • wjts

        “Waterloo Sunset” came out a month earlier and nothing’s topped it.

        • stepped pyramids

          “Waterloo Sunset” is definitely up there. I’d like to offer Roxy Music’s “Virginia Plain” as a contender, as well as Wire’s “Map Ref 41°N 93°W”.

        • Deborah Bender

          Tastes differ. I own several Van Morrison albums; nothing by the Kinks.

      • twbb

        “”Me and Julio” is catchy but it’s Simon trying to be a different ethnicity”

        I’m not sure I follow that; which ethnicity?

        • rea

          Gay

          [Woo Hoo! It gave me my rightful nym back!]

        • Deborah Bender

          I’m making the assumption that Julio’s buddy is Hispanic.

          • twbb

            Why? Uhh, no offense, but where did you grow up where that is an automatic assumption?

            • Deborah Bender

              Because Julio is a Hispanic name. He is more likely to have friends who are also Hispanic than ones who aren’t.

              • twbb

                I think you answered my question about the kind of place you grew up, and it’s kind of depressing. As someone who grew up in a neighborhood quite close to Corona, I can assure you that we don’t “stick to our own kind” in Queens.

                • Deborah Bender

                  I grew up in a mostly white suburban part of a middle sized city (Sacramento) and attended junior and senior high school at public schools that were integrated and ethnically diverse, but the social groups in those schools were pretty well separated by race, ethnicity, and class. I attended most of elementary school in Arlington, Virginia just before and just after Brown v. Board of Education. I don’t know why you would find this depressing; I had no choice over where my family lived or what public schools I attended.

  • Jason K.

    This is much catchier than it should be. Enjoy.

  • Bloix

    “one idiot in the audience can screw up a show.”
    I am a big fan of Lisa Hannigan, an Irish singer-songwriter. I don’t claim she’s a major talent but I’m in love with her anyway (as my wife says, who’s that singer you have a crush on?) We went to see her at one of these little clubs where you have to stand, and right in front of us there was a woman who insisted on doing this sinuous dance (hands waving above her head) through the whole show – this is not remotely dance music – entwining herself around her date, who wasn’t into it and was there only because he would get into her pants later. She was singing every word to every song, so I forgave her because she genuinely was a fan which went a long way in my book, but it was incredibly distracting.

    • Erik Loomis

      Yeah, it’s hard to get too mad at someone who genuinely expressing their love for a show, as opposed to someone who is talking because they don’t want to be there. But still.

      • M Lister

        many years ago I’d go to see bands play at a tiny little club in Boise called The Crazy Horse. Some pretty famous bands played there before they were famous. When the immediate predecessor to Built to Spill (for people who are in to that stuff), The Tree People (who were from Boise originally) would play, a friend of mine would often jump up on the stage and sing some of the songs instead of Doug Martsch (who he was sort of friends with, but not that much,) I tried, a few times, to tell him that no one came there to see him sing the songs, but it didn’t stop him.

  • wjts

    Connections were the opening act at the last show I went to. I’d never heard of them, but liked their performance enough to pick up one of their EPs at the merch table, mostly because of this song.

  • Mutaman

    Not as many complaints as I would have thought. Buck at only 13, Lefty at only 22, and Yoakam at 70 something is ridiculous. Didn’t Ray Charles have one of the greatest country albums ever? Did I miss Wynn Stewart somewhere?
    Hank not at number 1 is foolish but its impossible to overrate Merle. Glad to see Waylon get the respect he deserves. Where are the Derailers? shouldn’t the Stones get a mention just for Faraway Eyes?

    • Deborah Bender

      Faraway Eyes is a novelty song. Ray Charles OTOH.

      • Mutaman

        Nonsense. Its a paradoy and its mocking, but its a great song. Totally nails the Bakersfield sound and is an integral part of one of the most magnificent albums ever. Could definitely discuss at length what Mick is trying to do here but it follows the great tradition of the music Buck and Merle started. Full disclosure- i’m a huge mark for Mick’s singing and song writing.

        • Deborah Bender

          i own every Stones album up through Let It Bleed, have memorized many of the lyrics, and I also am a huge fan of Mick’s singing and song writing. I don’t like Faraway Eyes. Maybe I’m totally missing what Mick is trying to do here; I thought it was a filler track. YMMV.

          • Mutaman

            FWIW I think Keith agrees with you. I think I read where he thought Mick was disrespecting country music.
            I love the UK version of Out of Their Heads. You should definitely pick up Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main Street and Some Girls- get the ultra version because the bonus disc is terrific! Blue and Lonesome isn’t bad.

            Fun arguing with you.

            • Deborah Bender

              I’ve got Some Girls and like it pretty well.

  • Deborah Bender

    i like Worry Too Much. Thanks for putting up the entire album. Unlike the other two tracks I listened to, Worry Too Much isn’t gospel. I would call it a crossover rock/blues song, and it would work as acoustic guitar folk too, though the backing on the album is great.

  • howard

    some quick notes on geri allen: when she first came to notice, what, 35 years ago, she had can’t miss all over her: she had been mentored by marcus belgrave, had a broad understanding of african-american musical traditions, and had been influenced by all the right people (mccoy tyner, herbie hancock, cecil taylor) yet she had her own style. apparently she wasn’t crazy about the road and as best as i can tell, didn’t push herself, seeming to prefer teaching and mentoring. nonetheless, over the course of her career, musicians of the finest ranks (for example, motian and haden; for example, ornette, who essentially never recorded or played with a pianist, chose her when he finally did, in 1966) wanted her as a musical partner. sadly, i never got to see her, but i would recommend this starter kit:

    “etudes” (with haden and motian); “sound museum” (the ornette recording); “perfection” (a recent trio date with david murray and teri lynn carrington); “grand river crossings” (her tribute to motown); “zodiac suite revisited” (her tribute to pioneering woman jazz pianist mary lou williams’s greatest work); “printmakers” (her debut); and “flying to the sun” (her tribute to the aformentioned tyner, hancock, and taylor); and her xmas album is pretty darn good too!

  • Uncle_Ebeneezer

    Btw Erik, have you seen this? (Watching it now, think you’d dig it.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ipq4FefX5Ps

  • Robbert

    I saw Ted Leo & the Pharmacists live on an Easter Monday in either 2003 or 2004. For reasons unclear, there were only 22 people in attendance (yes, I counted them) but if that bothered the band, they didn’t let on. They really let rip as if they were standing in front of a packed Wembley stadium. Fantastic live band.

  • Dr. Acula

    I hope you don’t take this badly; I have one suggestion for when you do one of these posts in the future. WordPress has “above the fold” and a “below the fold” sections for posts. For reading posts below these ones, putting the bulk of this kind of post “below the fold” makes it much easier to find other posts.

  • M Lister

    No Frankie Lane and No Lyle Lovett on the country list. I suppose you could say that Frankie Lane is “Western” and not “country” but still, nearly all the songs on “Hell Bent for Leather” are epic. I really don’t get leaving Lovett out (unless I missed him?) He’s clearly country, and so much better than many included. I’d be willing to bump up Kenny Rogers a few spots for his duet with Wyclef Jean. The idea of Kenny going on the road with Wyclef, Big Beast, etc. is great to me:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx7PUOvTFJk

  • Steve Holmes

    I’ve seen John Moreland twice as a opener, it’s just him and his guitar. He has a powerful voice, but it’s not enough to overcome people in the back of the club trying to talk over him because they consider going to a club as their personal bar hopping stop. Frustrating.

    I agree that some editing would be nice for Kamari Washington’ Epic; but not if they edited out “Leroy and Lanisha”, sort of a reply from the hood to Vince Gauraldi’s “Linus Ana Lucy”. It is a beautiful song that should be a jazz standard. Mr Washington is great live, he give each member of the band some front time and they are all amazing musicians.

  • William Heaphy

    The algorithm governing my Apple Music feed has sent some very good stuff my way; this is all female-fronted Indie out of LA:

    Pom Poms: Garage/Girl Group influenced. Their excellent first album came out last spring.

    Alexandra Savior: Her record is a little on the slick side, but very impressive. She’s only 21 and working the same territory as Fiona Apple and Nicole Atkins. But better.

    Bloodboy: She hasn’t put together an album yet, but she has about a dozen songs out there, all worth listening to. Someone compared her to Karen O, but her voice is even bigger. She might to dial it down going forward

  • Then he [Simon] went into a long, sleepy solo career with not a whole lot of good albums.

    his self-titled record is fantastic. his stuff in between that and Graceland is uneven, but there are plenty of near-great records in there that end up marred by a bad song or two. Rhythm Of The Saints is also excellent.

  • sk7326

    The RnR Hall of Fame is a legitimately bad museum – it’s not kid friendly (which is not fatal, but come on now) and does not have anything interesting to say about its subject. I admit, that living near DC, I have a high entertainment bar for museums which charge money (spoiled of course) but that does not clear it.

    The Hall itself is ultimately a class-rock circle jerk, with its great champion (Rolling Stone) being THE jerkers of the form. There is something deeply ironic about Lou Reed being honored at a “industry gala”.

    In a related note, shouldn’t “classic rock” as a radio genre, have to go through re-evaluation every 10 years or so. Shouldn’t we have voted Bachman Turner Overdrive off the island and upvoted The Clash (more than those same 3 songs).

  • sk7326

    The worst inductee in the HoF is Genesis – while they can be argued as a good progrock band (or whatever) – the Genesis lineup that made them legitimately famous was after Peter Gabriel left. While mileage on Phil Collins can vary (I liked their 80s stuff for the pop-rock that it was), there is nothing about the actual “classic” Genesis lineup that warrants that sort of honor.

    • Joseph Slater

      They were way better with Gabriel though.

  • moeman

    CAKE does some great C&W covers. ‘Ruby’, ‘walk on by’ …

  • CJColucci

    One day, while searching the internet for something else, I stumbled across a site by a demented fan who produced Shania Twain porn — stories and photoshopped pictures. The internet is a strange place.

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