Home / "serious" conservative thought / Sometimes the lede says it all

Sometimes the lede says it all

Comments
/
/
/
515 Views

And what it says is “Why in the world are you reading The Spectator, anyway?”

Strange civil-rights struggles to vote without proof of identity and use a public bathroom based on gender identity animate today’s Democratic Party voters as they alienate yesterday’s.

Where Yesterday’s Democrats = Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms before they switched parties.

There is no good answer to the question, especially when the weather is so nice and the birds are singing and the nut graf begins by equating voting with other things that aren’t voting.

That’s when I decided to skip the article and check the author bio.

Daniel J. Flynn, the author of The War on Football: Saving America’s Game, edits Breitbart Sports.

Definitely time to go for a walk.

Update – Zebra swallowtail butterflies and five-lined skinks are two of the many benefits to abandoning The Spectator for the great outdoors.

USGS/Photographer Elizabeth A. Sellers
Maryland DNR/Photographer David Kazak
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • MAJeff

    Where Yesterday’s Democrats = Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms before they switched parties.

    Yer gonna make “Reagan Democrat” fetishist Chris Matthews cry.

  • N__B

    Daniel J. Flynn, the author of The War on Football: Saving America’s Game, edits Breitbart Sports.

    To quote a Bob Nelson routine from 1980 or so: the doctor said I had dain bramage.

    • the doctor said I had dain bramage.

      It’s a curse.

      • sharculese

        That’s bad.

        • sibusisodan

          But you get a free frozen yogurt!

          • sharculese

            That’s good.

      • efgoldman

        It’s a curse.

        Or a blessing.

    • Incontinentia Buttocks

      First they came for bareknuckle boxing, and I did not speak out, as I was not a fan of bareknuckle boxing.

      Then they came for cockfighting, and I did not speak out….

      • N__B

        Then they came for cockfighting, and I did not speak out….

        …because I did not have a cock.

        See! It’s all the fault of the women!

      • malraux

        Had you spoken out, you could be the governor of Kentucky.

        • efgoldman

          Had you spoken out, you could be the governor of Kentucky.

          Or Cardinal Bishop of New York.

        • John Revolta

          Not without a cock, he couldn’t.

        • Colin Day

          Or President of the University of South Carolina.

  • M31

    Here, let’s guess the thesis of “The War on Football: Saving America’s Game”.

    My entry:

    “Brain Damage got me my career, why are pansy milquetoast liberals trying to prevent brain damage?”

    • Matt

      IIRC, that would be an *improvement* over the actual one, which is something like “failing to exalt brain damage and encourage boys to do it is part of the sekrit feminist plot to destroy menz”.

      • N__B

        Secret? What secret? I said “Look, Martha. Here come the bombs.”

        • sharculese

          That’s maybe my single favorite Doonesbury strip.

          • efgoldman

            That’s maybe my single favorite Doonesbury strip.

            This past week’s arc of daily strips (from the 80s) about child care is pretty funny, too.
            Easy for me to say, of course, when our kid is grown, married, with a child of her own. But if you knew my [wonderful] son in law it’s very funny.

          • Thlayli

            “I’m a reasonable man, Macarthur, so I know this isn’t snow.”

            (I have had occasion to quote that line this month….)

            • Woodrowfan

              GUILTY GUILTY GUILTY!!!

  • Derelict

    Strange civil-rights struggles to vote without proof of identity and use a public bathroom based on gender identity animate today’s Democratic Party voters as they alienate yesterday’s.

    Yeah, I marched in Selma and got beaten by Klan members in Philadelphia, Mississippi because I supported Blacks being allowed to vote. But now that I realize those people didn’t have proper identification, I’m totally gonna vote for Ted Cruz.

    • Origami Isopod

      To be fair, I don’t think the “yesterday’s Democratic Party” voters he’s talking about marched in Selma. At least, not on the side you’re thinking of.

      • efgoldman

        I don’t think the “yesterday’s Democratic Party” voters he’s talking about marched in Selma.

        I don’t recall calling what Bull Connor did “marching.” Not the dogs, either.

        • DocAmazing

          More like “goose-steeping” and simply “stomping”.

          • Ask Me Gently

            Mmmm. Goose tea.

        • Origami Isopod
  • CP

    Strange civil-rights struggles to vote without proof of identity and use a public bathroom based on gender identity animate today’s Democratic Party voters as they alienate yesterday’s.

    Where Yesterday’s Democrats = Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms before they switched parties.

    Not to diminish his other accomplishments, but I think what I might be most thankful to Obama for is proving that you could win an election in modern America without pandering to the White People Riddled With Racial Anxieties vote. (Twice).

    Seems to me like something to celebrate, not something to angst over.

    • Steve LaBonne

      Hell, hell, hell yes.

    • Sly

      I don’t even bother trying to convince my racist relatives to vote for the liberal candidate anymore. “Oh, you’re voting for Muslimhater J. Buildawall? That’s nice. Could you take a break from wallowing in electoral irrelevancy for a moment and pass the salt?”

  • Hells Littlest Angel

    Strange civil rights. Not normal civil rights, like walking around armed to the teeth to defend your normal civil right to keep people who disgust you in their place.

    • DrDick

      In fairness, to conservatives (all of them), all civil-rights struggles are strange and incomprehensible and always have been.

      • efgoldman

        all civil-rights struggles are strange and incomprehensible and always have been.

        Not to the oppressed, reverse-discriminated-against white guys, they’re not.
        Poor babies.

  • Dangling Dildo of Damocles

    I always get a kick out of conservatives whimpering that Poll Taxes and “Official Internal Passports only!” equals INTEGRITUDE AND FREEEDUM!!

  • DAS

    Flynn 52 years ago: strange civil rights struggles to vote without proof of literacy and to use the same bathroom whites use.

    • Origami Isopod

      Flynn 47 years ago: Strange civil liberties, to be able to gather in a public place and pursue one’s romantic life as one will without the cops breaking in and beating the shit out of one.

      • Derelict

        That would actually be Flynn today. He’d MUCH rather each and every non-hetero person be beaten back into the closet.

        • Origami Isopod

          Yeah, I know. “Strange” as in less familiar.

          • DocAmazing

            Or maybe “Strange” as in “Fruit”.

            • Origami Isopod

              Ouch. Well done.

  • DAS

    I’d be more sympathetic to conservative desires to require ID for voting if they’d allow us to have free, easily obtained and secure national ID cards. But the second anybody proposes such a program, the religious nuts start going on and on about those cards being the sign of the beast and the glibertarians complain that such cards are the first step to us turning into a “show your papers” society like the communists and Europeans have.

    • sharculese

      A lot states offer a ‘free’ ID to use for the purpose of voting, but spoiler alert, it’s pretty much free in name only. I’ve told this story before, but I’ll tell it again, because it’s worth hearing and probably some people haven’t hear it before-

      I only learned to drive last year, so all through college I had no state issued ID. Which was fine, because I had my military dependent ID, which was good enough (Okay, one time a tattoo parlor was kind of pissed about it because having the birthday on the back makes it harder to prove I was over 18 for their records.)

      But those expire when you turn 21, so I figured I’d take advantage of the free ID provision in GA’s voting law.

      Step 1: Figuring out what I needed to get it in the first place, which was not easy even for someone with ready internet access and basic online literacy, so imagine what it’s like for someone without those things.

      Step 2: You had to have a notarized affidavit stating you had no other ID and needed one for the purpose of voting. Guess what a notary likes to see before they stamp things? Yeah, a photo ID. Fortunately, my father was able to take me to the notary at his credit union, who was willing to take his word for it who I was, but otherwise I’m not sure how I would have done it.

      Step 3: Actually getting to DDS to get the thing. And the DDS offices in north Atlanta are exclusively located in places that are hard to get to by public transit. Fortunately, I had people who could drive me there, but if you don’t have that, you’re essentially committing to burning a whole day just to get this thing.

      So yeah, I had a lot of shortcuts because of my status and upbringing. For people with those advantages, the idea that these IDs are ‘free’ is probably bullshit.

      • Breadbaker

        Of course the parts of North Atlanta not reachable by transit is mere coincidence and entirely unrelated to the racial makeup of either the denizens of those areas or their perception of who uses transit.

        • sharculese

          It’s still probably easier than getting to a DDS office from south Atlanta.

      • Warren Terra

        Also: notaries charge a nominal fee.

        I read a sort the other day of someone who spend days and hundreds of dollars trying to collect the paperwork necessary to get a state ID, and still failed.

        • sharculese

          It was a notary at a federal credit union, so there wasn’t a fee, which again, I had an easier time of this because I grew up middle class, and I’m decidedly not the sort of person the ‘free’ ID is intended to be a remedy for.

        • In order to get an emergency passport, I had to get a state ID, which I got by going over to the DMV with…basically nothing. A letter maybe. I don’t know if I used my expired passport. But then once I had that the passport people were happy. The passport place and the DMV were 5-6 miles, and a lot of hours of my life, apart.

          Why an expired passport wasn’t good enough, I have no idea.

          ETA: My point here is that it was merely annoying for me because I was on sabbatical and, well, I can usually rearrange my schedule to suit anyway. For people without that flexibility, oy.

      • Yes, and in the case of I.D. to vote, it is to combat a non-problem. I mean, people have been kidnapped and tortured for their ATM PINs but you don’t see any move to shut down ATMs or require some sort of additional I.D. in order to use them.

      • Johnny Sack

        Wow that’s insane. I rag on my state a lot (New York) but the DMVs I’ve been to in the city were pretty efficient and painless. Not even efficient and painless “for a DMV,” just efficient and painless. And there are a lot of options for the points of identification needed, though it is still a bit of a pain.

        And I have no real use for a NYC ID (although it would give me some New Yorker pride I guess) but that was a fantastic idea.

        • sharculese

          GA DDS is actually pretty efficient (except for the part where they lost my birth certificate.) It was every other part of the process that was the hassle.

        • efgoldman

          We vote at the elderly housing next door. Easy peasy.
          Except that some asshole state rep, who might have been ours but isn’t any more(!) pushed thru voter ID.
          In fucking Rhode Island.
          The email I sent her said “what are we, Alabama, now?”
          Anyway, not a problem for us, we have current licenses. But A couple of elections ago, we were behind a lady in line, lives in the complex, 80+. She doesn’t drive; the new requirements were not well publicized. So the poll workers, who knew who she was, had to ask for ID, from a person they know, who’d been voting since I was in grade school. Lady was very flustered (of course); finally the poll worker asked “do you have your Social Security card [not a legal ID], dear?” Yes. OK.
          Stupid beyond belief.

          • Origami Isopod

            In fucking Rhode Island.

            Which is proof that a Democratic monopoly will not necessarily give you progressive legislation.

    • max

      I’d be more sympathetic to conservative desires to require ID for voting if they’d allow us to have free, easily obtained and secure national ID cards.

      You could even go down to the post office! Name, age, height, weight (might as well) address, nationalization status, driver training status (as opposed to licensing which can be left to the states), weapon permissions, organ donor status, emergency medical instructions and allergies.

      Moving? Just go to the local post office and have them redirect your mail AND issue a new card at the same time for FREE.

      Same day as relocation automatic registration for all federal elections is uh, automagic. And issuing passports becomes super easy.

      Homeless people’s address is the nearest post office.

      max
      [‘Sounds great. Let’s fix this voter ID problem!’]

      • Derelict

        National ID?!?!?! Are you some kind of communist!?!?!

        Lemme ‘splain it to you ’cause it’s real simple: Requiring a White person to obtain, carry, and produce some sort of national identification is communism, pure and simple. We’re lucky we stopped that Roosevelt fella with just issuing a Social Security number to each citizen.

        Now, for anybody who’s not White–and especially for anybody who’s likely to vote for a Democrat? Well, creating stringent identification standards is just pure common sense. Why, George Washington himself would have written it into the Constitution if photography had existed back then!

        • [‘Sounds great. Let’s fix this voter ID problem!’]

          Problem, what problem? The voter ID laws are working as planned and I don’t see how your “solution” solves the problem of too many of those people voting.

      • Johnny Sack

        Agreed on all points except weight-that just fluctuates way too much for a lot of people. And our society is still uh less than accepting of people larger than an idealized standard so I don’t know if I like advertising weight on someone’s ID. But I guess the fluctuations are my problem. In the last two years since I renewed my license, I went from 200, to a low of ~180, back up to 190 for a spell, and then back to 200. Now back to 190. I know, not super healthy. But what does a person do? Do I have to update my ID and get a new one after I gain or lose more than, say, 10 pounds? I gotta shell out another fifty bucks because I went on a diet or I had a rough month?

    • Snarki, child of Loki

      Could an executive order to HHS to issue official federal photo-ID to recipients of Medicare, Medicaid, SS disability, and “food stamps” turn this whole GOP voter-ID ship around? Could be.

      But Obama Never. Even. Tried.

      • Bill Murray

        most of the laws specify IDs that are acceptable so this wouldn’t work. Heck many won’t even accept state college IDs

        • Ask Me Gently

          College IDs would indicate the holder is educated. And they don’t want that.

  • Nick056

    Anybody want to bet against odds that the guy who equates the potentially dangerous act of buying beer with voting — the most sacrosanct of civil rights — also happens to agree that girls should stay away from parties with lots of drinking to avoid rape?

    Anybody? Anybody?

    I’m starting to grok the type of axiomatic reasoning on display in the Republican brain. Women should avoid parties with lots of alcohol, and minorities should avoid parties with lots of voting.

    What? It’s just basic safety.

  • CrunchyFrog

    OT: I can’t vote for Hillary. This is a great surprise to me, but she actually went there. She said “I could care less”.

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/clinton-care-less-trump-critiques

    Seriously? And she allegedly went to Yale Law School? I want to see her grades.

    (For the humor impaired, this is sarcasm.)

    • jim, some guy in iowa

      whoa. I always thought I didn’t have dealbreakers, but…

      • Warren Terra

        … but this is literally the final straw.

        • Johnny Sack

          You Berniebros are a diamond dozen. But I guess it’s a doggie dog world in politics.

          But to play doubles advocate, this may be a blessing in the skies. Just don’t put your candidate on a petal stool.

        • Ahuitzotl

          well he’s in Iowa, there are probably a lot of straws

    • Davis X. Machina

      I’m voting for her irregardless.

      • N__B

        For all intensive purposes, the primary is already over.

        • N__B

          And Bernie’s supporters will have to tow the line.

          • max

            Only after they throw the gantlet.

            max
            [‘Is neb around here somewhere? I don’t think I’ve annoyed him recently.’]

            • Thirtyish

              We can’t take it for granite that they might not sit the election out.

              • Derelict

                That’s not very gneiss.

                • Perhaps we should change our tact here.

          • elm

            Too many Bernie supporters are Pre-Madonnas. They’ll never tow the line.

            • Cher is a Pre-Madonna.

              • efgoldman

                Brindle E, also too.

          • That’s gonna be a hard road to ho.

        • max

          Like, you people really need to reign this in.

          max
          [‘Hillary will rain soon enough.’]

        • brad

          It’s a mute point, yes.

        • chrisc

          With that, she literally lost the race.

          (edit: argh, too slow!)

          • PohranicniStraze

            Surely you mean she is literally going to loose the race?

      • Incontinentia Buttocks

        This begs the question: are there are any other idiom-based electoral deal-breakers?

        • N__B

          No, because this is a republic, not a democracy.

          • Warren Terra

            But we can keep it only so long as the Tree of Liberty is watered from time to time with the blood of tyrants, and that anyone who chops it down fesses up.

            • Origami Isopod

              Or pulls it up by the routes.

        • rm

          No, defiantly not, but I won’t keep quite about it.

    • jpgray

      Is their anything more annoying then that? To deeply hurt you and I, it’s annoying qualities are very unique. Literally chomping at the bit for a true lover of the language, this is something we can’t put up with!

      • sharculese

        Winner.

      • Origami Isopod

        this is something we can’t put up with!

        Prepositions that end sentences, and split infinitives, are both perfectly good English. Which is not Latin.

        • jpgray

          Weighed it down with as many bugbears as came to mind – no usage activism intended!

        • Johnny Sack

          Split infinitives are perfectly valid stylistic choices. I got into a shouting match with my fourth grade teacher about this. Yes I was a demon child but I was right goddammit!

          • Hogan

            The English-speaking world may be divided into (1) those who neither know nor care what a split infinitive is; (2) those who do not know, but care very much; (3) those who know and condemn; (4) those who know and approve; and (5) those who know and distinguish.

            Those who neither know nor care are the vast majority, and are a happy folk, to be envied by most of the minority classes. ‘To really understand’ comes readier to their lips and pens than ‘really to understand’; they see no reason why they should not say it (small blame to them, seeing that reasons are not their critics’ strong point), and they do say it, to the discomfort of some among us, but not to their own.

            H. R. Fowler

            • JL

              At first I misread (2) as “those who do know, but do not care very much” and was ready to claim membership in that category.

        • Johnny Sack

          Trying to impose Latin rules on English is annoying. On the flip side, you have something similar-not about grammar per se, but the movement to purge English of foreign words, mostly to purge it of its French influence. I think the whole Anglish thing might have been a joke, but I have seen people on the Internet take it seriously. My reaction is always-the Norman conquest was 1000 years ago this century. Maybe get over it?

          • Derelict

            Always amusing to hear how many words cross-pollinate from one language to another. I remember being in Greece and listening to my father discuss with his aunt her latest and greatest acquisition: a refrigerator. The word for refrigerator in Greek is, well, refrigerator.

            • N__B

              The Russian word for car is “machine.”

              • rea

                futbol

                • DocAmazing

                  In much of Central America, toothpaste is “colgate” (three syllables).

            • efgoldman

              Always amusing to hear how many words cross-pollinate from one language to another.

              When I was a child, my grandmother listened to Yiddish language radio. It amused me greatly to here the English-language dropped in words like “Tuna Fish” and “Chevrolet.”

          • Origami Isopod

            I hadn’t heard of the “Anglish” thing before. That’s remarkably pointless. Is this a serious movement, or just a couple of cranks with time on their hands?

            • N__B

              The Angles and the Saxons are johnny-come-latelies. True supremacists worship their celtic forebears. Blue paint for everybody!

              • efgoldman

                Blue paint for everybody!

                Funny, you don’t look bluish (or Druish).

              • Origami Isopod

                It’s certainly been a long and winding woad.

          • elm

            And, as we all know, the French have no word for entrepreneur.

          • Colin Day

            Both Churchill and Orwell suggested using Anglo-Saxon words whenever possible. Also, I suspect that English grammarians (English as a nationality, not a language) tended towrads Latin grammar at a time when English (the language) lacked grammar.

        • Warren Terra

          Prepositions that end sentences, and split infinitives, are both perfectly good English

          The rules against both are good guidelines. I’d recommend anyone tend to follow them until they know enough to break them.

          • Origami Isopod

            This, sir, is nonsense up with which I shall not put.

            (But, no, actually, bending over backward not to end a sentence with a preposition doesn’t make for better writing. Split infinitives can sound a little cheesier if you don’t know what you’re doing, but OTOH “to boldly go” beats out “to go boldly.”)

            • OTOH “to boldly go” beats out “to go boldly.”

              Neither holds a Roman candle to “boldly to go”.

    • GeoX

      The only thing more annoying than people who say “could care less” are people who get all theatrically outraged over people who say “could care less.”

      • I always read “I could care less” as “I could care less but it’s not worth the effort”. I.e., you already care so little, that any further reduction in the amount of caring wouldn’t be worth the effort.

        So…I get confused when people get outraged.

        (I mean, I always saw it as an intensifier over “I couldn’t care less”, which, of course, is ambiguous.)

        • sonamib

          Alternatively, you can read it as “I could care less about it, if you keep droning on and on about it”. That’s how I read it anyway. I don’t understand why people get so outraged.

        • CrunchyFrog

          Nah, it’s about the cadence. People who say “I could care less” mean “I could not care less” but the 5 syllable version is more awkward, with the stress on the third syllable, which is a weak word. The 4 syllable version has the advantage of placing equal stress on the last 3 words – making it more emphatic.

          Cadence reasons are also why “irregardless” persists, and why people say illogical things with the word “only” misplaced. In call cases, it should be noted, the listener understands if he/she is fluent in English so the phrases nevertheless work. (And if you aren’t fluent in English, just figure everything is an idiom and just go with it rather than trying to figure out what people mean from the actual words. Otherwise you’ll get stuck the first time you ask someone to pass the salt and she answers “Here you go”).

          As someone on the upper side of middle ages I have long ceased caring about how other people say what they say, but still find it interesting because I enjoy learning the details of things that are in common usage and have all kinds of backstories and etymologies. I also avoid using those incorrect phrases myself, but oddly have also generally stopped using the correct version either. I can’t remember using “I could not care less” or “regardless” in speech, for example, for a very long time. I just gravitate to the none-controversial phrases.

          • DAS

             if you aren’t fluent in English, just figure everything is an idiom and just go with it rather than trying to figure out what people mean from the actual words. 

            This is no doubt true. And yet certain people wonder why those furriners can’t learn to speak English. Are there any other languages as idiom-filled as English? Maybe Chinese …

            • sonamib

              Uh, all languages are filled with idioms? In Brazil there are lots of them football (soccer) related.

          • sonamib

            Ok, serious question : why is “I could care less” wrong but “I couldn’t care less” right? Both depend on context to be correctly interpreted.

            And I’m definitely caring too much about this, ain’t I?

          • Wow, you’re right. The extra syllable in “irregardless” does make it more satisfying.

          • Nah, it’s about the cadence.

            I’m sure that’s true but 1) I was joking and 2) I back interpret it this way so it all makes sense. I even generally say it with a weary tone to fit :)

          • Origami Isopod

            Euphony, or human laziness if you’re feeling less charitable, explains a lot of language change.

      • jpgray

        The only thing more annoying than people annoyed by it are those expressing annoyance with them; these in turn annoy and are annoyed by the annoyance of those who are annoyed.

        At that point we all get annoyed, and descend hand-in-hand down the boughs of a fractal annoyance tree, grown of reciprocal petty grievances, each more trivial than the last.

        • efgoldman

          ::sung:: We are marching to Pedantia… Pedantia… Pedantia…

          • rea

            We’re marching, marching to Shibboleth,
            With the Eagle and the Sword!
            We’re praising Zion ’til her death,
            Until we meet our last reward!

          • LNM_in_LA

            Late to this dis-cuss-shun, but what the hey.

            The Wife (she who attended Royal Holloway College with a major in English Lititcher, ahem, ‘read English Literature’) and I will sometimes descend into vicious argument concerning ‘proper usage’.

            Sooner or later one of us will wake up and begin singing our mediation song, ‘Pedant, Pedant, Pedant Pedant Pedant’ . . .

            Think Pink Panther . . .

        • Origami Isopod

          “Your mom fell out of the fractal annoyance tree and hit every branch on the way down.”
          – best playground taunt nobody has ever said, anywhere

          • efgoldman

            best playground taunt nobody has ever said, anywhere

            I want to see that playground, and send my granddaughter there.
            Do they have a quantum jungle gym? “Where’s Bobby?!? He was right there. Unless he wasn’t.”

    • TribalistMeathead

      I thought it couldn’t get worse than “touch bases,” until I saw someone write “touch basis.”

      Actually, I’m not sure if either is worse than “All those in favor of X, say ‘I.'”

    • Ahuitzotl

      for the non-humour-impaired, it is serious?

  • max

    Daniel J. Flynn, the author of The War on Football: Saving America’s Game, edits Breitbart Sports.

    If Hitler had played football, he would have been too brain damaged to get elected! World War II would have been prevented! Remember kids! Only *you* can prevent outbreaks of Hitler!

    max
    [‘So get out there and start pile-driving that concrete tackling dummy! It builds character!’]

  • max

    And what it says is “Why in the world are you reading The Spectator, anyway?”

    Quite.

    There is no good answer to the question, especially when the weather is so nice and the birds are singing and the nut graf begins by equating voting with other things that aren’t voting.

    Lovely, isn’t it?

    max
    [‘Global warming isn’t all bad. It’s just mostly bad.’]

  • cpinva

    I would happily have risked long-term brain damage, just to get a shot at Ted Cruz. one of the advantages/disadvantages to playing cornerback, is that you’re generally going full speed when you tackle someone. I can only imagine the squeak he would have let out, just as I drove him to the dirt. oh well, only in my imagination.

    • Derelict

      That “squeak” would have been the sound of his colon emptying.

      My guess is that ol’ Teddles is the plenty manly man right up to the point where anything more than minor annoyance may occur. At which point Ted’s motto becomes “Let’s you and him fight!”

      • Origami Isopod

        That “squeak” would have been the sound of his colon emptying.

        Thank you for emitting, Ted!

  • struggles to vote without proof of identity

    Why will none of these clowns admit that identity is proved at registration, not when a registered voter votes?

    Oh. Never mind.

    • efgoldman

      Why will none of these clowns admit that identity is proved at registration

      Your “logic” and common sense are liberal constructs.

  • Michael Cain

    Update – Zebra swallowtail butterflies and five-lined skinks are two of the many benefits to abandoning The Spectator for the great outdoors.

    Spent my great outdoors time today out shoveling six inches of wet heavy snow off the driveway. Oh, well, supposed to be 80 again by the end of the week…

    • sharculese

      Pollen season is finally at a clear end, so I need to make time to wash the yellow residue off my car some time this week.

      • efgoldman

        Our front-yard maple trees next to the driveway are always a coupe of weeks late for some reason. But when they pollinate, holy crap! You almost can’t tell what color the care actualy is.

        • sharculese

          I had a friend in law school who grew up in New York and was previously a risk analyst on Wall Street. He came down here for a conference, fell in love with the city and decided it was where he wanted to live. After several months of trying to get his bosses to understand that he meant what he was saying (conversations went along the lines of “you… want to transfer away from the home office? To Atlanta?“) they finally let him do it.

          Come his first spring in Atlanta and he walks out shocked to see his car covered in yellow powder. When a neighbor explained to him what was going on his response was “that’s ridiculous, pollen isn’t a thing you can see.”

          • efgoldman

            his response was “that’s ridiculous, pollen isn’t a thing you can see.”

            I’m a city kid, too, but I’ve been here in the ‘burbs long enough to learn.

            • sharculese

              In Atlanta, visible pollen isn’t a thing that’s isolated to the suburbs. I live in the city. My car has been yellow for the past couple of weeks.

              • efgoldman

                In Atlanta, visible pollen isn’t a thing that’s isolated to the suburbs.

                Some of us live where there are four proper seasons.

                • Hogan

                  FOR NOW.

                • N__B

                  I blame Vivaldi.

                • Michael Cain

                  For me, it’s Colorado — where there are four seasons, and we’re not afraid to use any three of them in the same week. Six inches of snow last night, sunny and 80 by Friday.

                  As for pollen, if you’re hiking in the right place in the Colorado Rockies during the first half of June, you can see clouds of yellow pine pollen blowing down the valleys.

              • sharculese

                I don’t care for one of those seasons and am happy to live in a place where it doesn’t happen.

                • efgoldman

                  am happy to live in a place where it doesn’t happen.

                  BO-ring!
                  You would have loved last winter (2014-15) when we had snow piled up to the gutters.

                • LNM_in_LA

                  I have visited that season on occasion, and while I grant you the fact that it ain’t boring, given the choice I would rather not have to contend with the excitement. The weather around here is weird enough.

                  But. Unfortunately, it looks like I’ll have to be spending a couple of years in Texas starting in a year or so, so I hope my sexagenarian heart can stand the strain.

                  The Wife has declared, rightly in my view, that she’s gonna have none of it.

                  Not just because her well(ish) paid job would not exist there, but because Texas has Texans innit. They are generally nice individually, the Texicans, they really are; but put ’em in a group and the stoopid comes out.

                  Besides, the joint lately seems to be going through a modified version of the plagues visited on Egypt; floods, tornadoes, hail, etc.

                  Long distance romance for two, three years, and then back home.

              • Ahuitzotl

                Sharc, you have to reassure it and help it face its fear.

            • DAS

              We get enough pollen here in Queens that the cars get visibly coated with the stuff. Last night wasn’t so bad, but the previous two nights were bad enough that we had to close the windows because I had allergic reactions to the pollen drifting in: and that’s with me taking a daily antihistamine and daily steroidal nasal spray.

      • Origami Isopod

        For me it’s red residue.

        (“Why do they call it a red maple, when the leaves are green? … Oh.”)

It is main inner container footer text