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Supersize My Abortion

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I wrote the following entry a few months ago, but I’m doing an encore presentation of it here because I think it serves as a nice addendum to Scott’s post from earlier today.

Kevin Williamson, Internet-famous for writing a couple of screeds about about women being money-hungry, status-seeking hoors and little else, temporarily removed Mitt Romney’s penis from his mouth and stopped fapping to his Romney/Ryan slashfic so he could appear on “Up.” There he used a phrase I would like to douse in gasoline and burn atop the ash heap of history. The phrase is “abortion on demand,” and its inanity is nothing less than breathtaking.

It’s a favorite of the wingnut world, and if you hear a person use it, recognize it for the red flag that it is. It’s meant to imply that abortion is crudely common and that the women who have abortion are crude and common. They want you to picture some mangy-looking broad in hotpants and a tube top** sauntering up to a counter and saying “Gimme the fish fillet sandwich, a large Coke and an abortion. Oh, and super-size it.” A lot women have abortions. A lot of women have them for convenience. But none of them have them for fun. But because making women who have abortions into caricatures is the only way to win the debate over reproductive rights, wingnuts will double down on this stereotype: women who have abortions are just lazy, irresponsible sluts who have no regard for human life.

The phrase is also comically inept because it implies that abortions could happen in a manner that does not involve “demand” in some form. I mean, I’m sure forced abortion is a thing (and the idea of it disgusts me), but I’m guessing it’s stunningly rare (especially in this country). Unless the morons who use this phrase are simply put out that some women have not asked politely for their abortions. None of this ON DEMAND stuff. I’m suddenly picturing thousands of women plunking some money on a counter and screaming “GIVE ME MY LAVENDER-SCENTED RELAXATION ABORTION  NOW, BITCHES! AND SUPER-SIZE IT!”

For the record, I’ve searched and searched for Abortion on my cable’s On Demand menu, and I have never found it.

I mean, at some point, women will have to communicate the wish to have to an abortion (if they desire one), and this communication will be either verbal, signed or written. Because how else will women demand their “Bella and Edward Vampire-Human Hybrid No Workee So Good Commemorative Abortion’?* Then again, a decent woman might send her request via carrier pigeon. It’s more proper.

*available only at participating Happy Good Funtime Abortions and Tanning

UPDATE: **As I clarify downthread, when I use these descriptors I’m being stream of conscious here and using language I might imagine an asshole would use. Use. Also, I don’t give a shit what a woman wears when she gets an abortion, nor do I make it a habit of calling women “broads.”

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  • brad

    Please, someone comment on the post directly already so I can go ahead and be a snarky asshole about GG being disappointed on behalf of women that one would associate with a place so hostile to her gender.

    In any case, good to have you added to the roll.

  • Murc

    It seems like if any phrase is ripe for reclamation, it is this one.

  • This is a persistent frustration of mine.

    But this phrase was already in the lexicon when Video On Demand became a thing, right? Because I never understood the logic of that one either. Does abortion somehow figure into the post-network world in a way I’m missing?

  • OmerosPeanut

    The phrase ‘abortion on demand’ always struck me as being so over the top that I had a hard time understanding why it seemed to be an effective bludgeon in some (awful) segments of public debate. How could anyone, anywhere associate the decision to have an abortion with consumerism?

    “Honey, I’m going to the store to pick up a gallon of milk. Do you want an abortion while I’m out?”

    • sharculese

      Tone-deafness is the anti-choice movement’s biggest weakness, and one we should be doing more work to exploit.

      See e.g. the trolls who try to pretend they’re pro-choice but can’t stop themselves from saying things like ‘abortionist’ and ‘baby-killing’.

      • OmerosPeanut

        That’s the thing; it had been so long since I’d heard the phrase “abortion on demand without apology” that I forgot the phrase originated with the pro-choice movement – at least, I think that’s how it happened. This is all at the very beginning of my political consciousness in the 90’s and earlier. It sounds like a phrase designed to be used by anti-choice groups.

        • sharculese

          see also ‘safe, legal, and rare’

          • OmerosPeanut

            Yeah, that one I remember very well. And screw the ‘rare,’ unless you’re proposing a national sex-ed curriculum to do something toward making abortions rare for a good reason rather than a bad one.

            • sharculese

              national sex-ed curriculum

              But that will turn our teenagers into sluts!

              • Only if you SAY “sex.” If you make cross swishing motions for the “X” it will be fine.

                • OmerosPeanut

                  Oh, so that is what Marcus Bachmann was doing all along?

                • OmerosPeanut:

                  You mean the X in “ex-gay?”

                  ‘Cause otherwise, I’m afraid, well . . . *mimes airplane flying over head*

                • OmerosPeanut

                  Sort of. “Cross swishing motions” had my brain force-feeding me a memory of this video.

            • rea

              Well, yeah, it ought to be rare, because it ought not to get to the point of an abortion absent contraceptive failure, or an unexpected medical problem, or rape, or some other unusual circumstance. Like the post says, no one is having them for fun. But the way they become rare is not by legislation,or by guilt-tripping people into not having them–it’s by people learning to be more knowledgeable and sensible about contraception and family planning, and by making contraception readily available. And the reason they ought to be rare is not because abortions are immoral, or sex is immoral, but because it’s a hassle and a minor risk that it makes sense to avoid if you can.

              • joe from Lowell

                I always equated the “rare” language with the longstanding effort to get contraception covered under health insurance, and the empowerment of women to control whether and when they get pregnant.

                I think you’re really out to pick a fight if you have a problem with “safe, legal, and rare.”

                • Huh! I always heard it as “safe, legal, and discouraged” which I know you’d find problematic.

                  Ie I thought it was a sop to antiabortion folks. It seemed more in tune with “choose adoption” rather than “free contraception”.

                  Interesting.

                  (So, yes, abortion should be rare in that unwanted pregnancies, traumatic medical conditions etc should be rare because we have better/safer ways of dealing with them. Abortion should not necessarily be rare in that women who want or need them should be coerced into not having them.)

              • OmerosPeanut

                That’s the longform reason for why I wanted to drop ‘rare’ from ‘safe, legal, and rare’ and to focus on quality national sex-ed. I also should have added something about pressure on the FDA to stop making completely safe contraceptives require a prescription.

        • Huh. That’s fascinating. I can see that it’s a goal worth having, but that “demand” thing is still there.

          Maybe it could be clarified? “Abortion on demand (issued to licensed medical professionals) without apology.” Because I’m fairly pro-choice, but I think requiring any random person to perform an abortion just because someone demanded it of them is kind of unreasonable.

      • Malaclypse

        See e.g. the trolls who try to pretend they’re pro-choice but can’t stop themselves from saying things like ‘abortionist’ and ‘baby-killing’.

        In the last thread, asmith, who was totally pro-choice, referred to “executed” fetuses.

        • sharculese

          He also kept referring to abortions as ‘filth,’ because that’s what all the hip young people are saying nowadays.

        • People underestimate the difficulty in building blastocyst-sized electric chairs.

          • Bill Murray

            I think the MEMS technology of today can handle this nicely

            • BigHank53

              Oh, the chairs are no problem. Hooking up those itty-bitty wires is a dog, though, and you really run into problems when you try to run any high voltage down them. Between the wires being so close together and the damp environment, you get a lot of arcing. We’re having better luck fabricating an X-band waveguide, so we can just microwave ’em instead.

              (Yes, I spend too many years working with MEMS.)

  • oudemia

    “Abortion On Demand Without Apology” was a pretty common slogan in the day. I like its frankness.

    • OmerosPeanut

      Can we just strike the ‘on demand’ from it, then?

      • bspencer

        Yeah, that makes more sense to me.

  • Murc

    “Gimme the fish fillet sandwich, a large Coke and an abortion. Oh, and super-size it.”

    “Would you like your free miniature American flag with that?”

    • sharculese

      You can’t get an abortion and a miniature American flag. That’s just greedy.

    • MAJeff

      “Gimme the fish fillet sandwich, a large Coke and an abortion. Oh, and super-size it.”

      The abortion byproduct is the special sauce.

      • sharculese

        You joke but I have heard anti-choicers for real claim they throw aborted fetuses in the river, and that fish has fetal content.

        • MAJeff

          Where else do you get Omega-3 Fetal Acids?

        • Pseudonym

          I thought they put them in Pepsi?

    • Bill Murray

      I think a pigfoot and a bottle of beer might be appropriate to be given

    • cpinva

      “Would you like your free miniature American flag with that?”

      your flag decal won’t get you into heaven anymore.

  • sharculese

    I mean, I’m sure forced abortion is a thing (and the idea of it disgusts me), but I’m guessing it’s stunningly rare (especially in this country).

    So my work sometimes requires me to visit anti-choice websites, and in this capacity I found something a couple of weeks ago that was just too precious: a form you could fill out and fax (yes, they said fax) to every abortion provider in the area, if you thought you were about to be forced to have an abortion against your will.

    The evidence that this was a serious thing: an anecdote about a young woman who just last week (that is the phrase they actually used) was dragged into a clinic by her mother protesting that she didn’t want an abortion, she wanted to have the baby. The horrible no-good baby-murdering clinic of course strapped her in and went ahead with it refused to perform an abortion on a non-consenting patient and gave her the number of a bunch of shelters. Because that’s how awful those people are.

    • bspencer

      Seriously. What else would you do? Choice really does mean choice. And obviously forcing women to have abortions is not choice.

      • sharculese

        There is a widespread belief in anti-choice land that people who are all about bodily autonomy want force you to undergo medical procedures you don’t want. Because duh.

        • I teach at a Catholic school that holds a pro-life conference every year. Half of it is “I had an abortion and regretted it” propaganda, and the other half is usually “did you know the Chinese practice forced abortion?”

          • rea

            Well, the Chinese do practice forced abortion, but the constitutional right of privacy prevents any such program here.

            • Right – I was driving more at that the focus is on the least objectionable parts of the pro-life movement; parts where they might agree with pro-choice activists (forced abortion in China) or subjective experiences that aren’t really about the policy or the rights.

        • herr doktor bimler

          Transvaginal ultrasound and such as.

          • If you call it “transvaginal on demand” you’ll have MRAs lined up around the block.

        • Bill Murray

          is duh short for because that’s what we want to do to you?

    • JL

      The evidence that this was a serious thing: an anecdote about a young woman who just last week (that is the phrase they actually used) was dragged into a clinic by her mother protesting that she didn’t want an abortion, she wanted to have the baby. The horrible no-good baby-murdering clinic of course strapped her in and went ahead with it refused to perform an abortion on a non-consenting patient and gave her the number of a bunch of shelters. Because that’s how awful those people are.

      I know someone who used to work as a counselor at Planned Parenthood, who had basically this same story, from years ago.

  • Sharon

    I asked for a mother [email protected]’ iced tea when and got my abortion and they jumped right on both request.

    So there’s that.

    • avoidswork

      I wish I could say the same. Jerks gave me *sweetened* tea and that is not what I demanded!

      • witless chum

        I’m in favor of legal abortion, but sweet tea needs to be banned by constitutional amendment, frozen into blocks and dumped into the Indian Ocean.

  • Mrs. Garrison

    I’m pregnant? Yay! Now I can have an abortion!

  • For the record, I’ve searched and searched for Abortion on my cable’s On Demand menu, and I have never found it.

    I don’t know about cable, but on Netflix, it’s either on “Services No One Actually Provides” or “Right-Wing Nut-Job Boogeythings.”

    • bspencer

      Actually, I was being disingenuous. When I search for “Abortion” on Netflix, it takes me to the remake of “The Women.”

      • Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand it’s gone! A moonshot!

      • Malaclypse

        When I search for “Abortion” on Netflix, it takes me to the remake of “The Women.”

        This needs to get added to the rotating pithy sayings up on the masthead.

        • jim, some guy in iowa

          yes it does

  • Malaclypse

    Why can’t I get my abortion-on-demand? This proves that white males are the last acceptable target for this kind of blatant discrimination.

    • OmerosPeanut

      …do you have Netflix?

    • BigHank53

      Have you considered outsourcing? I understand you can get a Chinese national to have an abortion for almost nothing.

    • I hear if you get a super-sized gay abortion it comes with a side of tater tots.

    • ajay

      Why can’t I get my abortion-on-demand? This proves that white males are the last acceptable target for this kind of blatant discrimination.

      Let’s all agree that Mal can’t have an abortion – which is nobody’s fault, not even the Romans’ – but he can have the right to have an abortion.

  • Scott P.

    The opposite of abortion on demand is abortion only with permission. Of a man, of course.

    • djangermats

      Abortion by committee

      • sharculese

        deth panelz!

      • Joe

        directly addressed by Doe v. Bolton … that’s how it would be.

  • thebewilderness

    They like that “on demand” line because it makes it sound like a stick up instead of a medical procedure or pill.

    • OmerosPeanut

      BREAKING NEWS. MUST CREDIT CNN: An abortion clinic were held up today by five women in ski masks. Early report has it they demanded all the abortions kept in the clinic’s pharmacy. One of them is also believed to be the Boston Marathon bomber.

    • bspencer

      Yup. Like it’s weird or exotic (in an ugly way) instead of something fairly common.

  • T. Paine

    I’ll take two; they’re small.

    • bobbyp

      sliders.

  • This is why I’m trying to get the phrase pro-coathanger to catch on.

    • sharculese

      Posted this on the last thread, but you can’t actually shame them with that.

      • That would require them to have shame. But it would probably work on more moderate/sane people. Don’t bother with the diehards.

  • Hogan

    If this causes confusion, I’ll change it to B. Spencer.

    Confusion is a stage on the way from bullshit to knowledge. Don’t discourage it.

  • philadelphialawyer

    Come on now….

    The term “abortion on demand” means just what it says. That a woman can demand an abortion, and get one, without any showing of anything else, eg medical necessity, that the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest, etc. As has been pointed out, before we became all apologetic, us pro choicers used to use the term. I did and still do, and proudly support abortion on demand.

    Of course, like everything else, the term has a foul taste when used by the forced maternity crowd (I won’t use the term “pro life”). But that shouldn’t prevent us from using it.

    And, by the way, women in hot pants and tube tops and who are “mangy looking” have just as much right as any other woman, have every right, to abortions. It is not that I think you believe otherwise, nor do I contest your claim that the forced maternity crowd try to stereotype, caricature, and stigmatize woman who seek abortions. No, what I’m saying is I won’t play. I don’t care how much and to what extent they try to stereotype, caricature, etc women who seek abortions. All women have the right to abortions, and, yes, abortions on demand. No matter how they dress. No matter what their attitude. Whether they “saunter” in or not. Or, even, if they get “joy” out of it or are “just lazy, irresponsible sluts who have no regard for human life.” No matter how their oppressors characterize them, even if it were true, I won’t back down.

    “Safe, legal and rare?” I don’t care about “rare.” Safe and legal are all that matter to me. Every abortion “on demand” is, in fact, a good thing. Because it is better than a forced pregnancy. And I think using that term (“rare”) plays into the anti reproductive freedom crowd’s hands. As does shying away from the term “on demand.”

    • bspencer

      When I used the tube tops and “mangy-looking” descriptor, I was temporarily using the voice of an asshole. I don’t call women “broads,” nor do I care what they wear when they get abortions.

      • philadelphialawyer

        I understand that, and thought I had made that clear. My apologies if I didn’t.

      • Witt

        Not to take away from the general theme of the post, but I got stuck on another phrase that you used — “No Workee So Good.”

        Next time, can you pick something that doesn’t have the connotations of ridiculing non-native English speakers?

        • Eyeroll.

          • sharculese

            What’s wrong with reminding people that we have a lot of phrases in our vocabulary that we should work harder to not use?

            • CAD

              The futility of the exercise, for one.

              The counterproductive aspect of policing the language, for another.

          • joe from Lowell

            Does this “eye roll” comment mean you will stop doing exactly the same thing all the time, Mr. Virgin Forest?

        • Because honestly non-English speakers weren’t whom I had in mind when I wrote that. It was general silliness I was after, not a dig at people who are learning English.

          • Witt

            I get that that wasn’t your intent.

            The reason I mentioned it is because ridiculing “Asian” sounding non-native English speakers is pretty commonly done with words like the ones you used, and I thought you might want to avoid seeming to endorse that in the future.

            (Asian in quotes because obviously “Asian” isn’t a language.)

            • It’s weird you went right to Asian.

              When I wrote the sentence I was picturing someone like me saying it, and the target of my mockery was “Twilight,” not foreign-born people.

    • OmerosPeanut

      My distaste for ‘on demand’ isn’t that it’s been lost to the anti-choice crowd, but that it’s been lost to consumerism through advertising (e.g. video on demand). This warps the connotation worse than any effort on the part of the anti-choicers.

      • philadelphialawyer

        Meh. There are only so many words out there. I have no problem with “video on demand.” It is on demand, no?

        Consumerism, and advertising, if they are going to exist at all, are going to use words like “freedom” and “choice” and so on. I can’t see that as a reason for not using those words in other, more important, contexts. Same with the words “on demand.”

        • bobbyp

          Do you use the term buying cars “on demand” or joining health clubs “on demand”? The propaganda is falsely implying demand = witless narcissistic whim.

          And it is contemptible.

          • thebewilderness

            What you are overlooking is the cultural conditioning that takes a dim view of women demanding anything.
            We are supposed to ask politely and never ever ever be shrill or uppity. That is the basis for the outraged tone when sneering that Feminists want abortion on demand.

            • philadelphialawyer

              Which, of course, is yet another reason NOT to stop using that term.

          • philadelphialawyer

            I’m not sure I get your point. On the one hand, I am told that consumerism/advertising has colonized the term “on demand,” so that its continued use in the abortion debate plays into the other side’s hands, because having an abortion is equated with buying a movie on TV. On the other hand, you are emphasizing that we DON’T typically use the term “on demand” when it comes to standard consumer choices. Does “on demand” mean witless narcissistic whim, because of its use in the term “movies on demand,” or does “on demand” not relate to such whims, because we don’t use that term when buying things, like health club memberships or cars, generally?

            My views are (1) that any term, even one that was used by pro choicers, like “on demand,” is going to sound sour when used by the other side, and (2) that advertising/consumerism uses lots of terms that are also used in discourse about human rights, and that we shouldn’t let the former prevent the latter.

            More generally, I’m not sure how “demanding” something necessarily equal exercising a narcissistic witless desire. The point of “on demand,” as used by both pro choices and even the oppressors (when they are in factual mode, anyway), is that women can have abortions without having to do more than ask for (“request?”) them. No medical necessity, financial hardship, emotional distress, rape or incest, etc, need be shown. That, in and of itself, is not a bad thing. To demand something, and to be able to get it, is not necessarily the mark of witlessness or selfishness. If accused of a felony, I might “demand” a jury trial, and then I am entitled to such a trial. The jury trial is mine “on demand.” Yeah, and? And that is also the state of law for early abortions, and it is also the very thing we want.

            Again, I proudly favor abortion on demand, and without apology either. I see no reason to run away from that formulation, no matter what the forced pregnancy people are snidely implying when they use it nor what the connotation, as derived from terms

            • philadelphialawyer

              oops

              …used in consumer advertising, is.

    • joe from Lowell

      “Safe, legal and rare?” I don’t care about “rare.” Safe and legal are all that matter to me.

      You don’t care whether there are more or fewer women who have unwanted pregnancies?

      Every abortion means that a woman lost control of her reproductive life. How can you not want less of that?

      • joe from Lowell

        You know who cares an awful lot about making abortion rare?

        Planned Parenthood. They put an awful lot of money and effort into making sure that as few women as possible need their abortion services.

        • philadelphialawyer

          And that’s fine for PP.

          But I am not a woman’s health care provider. I’m a lawyer. Rights are my business. And, as the other poster points out, saying that you want something to be “rare” undercuts support for that thing. Radical free speech, should we see “safe, legal and rare” as its proper place in our scheme of rights? Once you concede “rare” as a goal, you open all sorts of questions about minimization. If we want abortions to be rare, then what is wrong with elaborate “informed consent” requirements, etc, etc?

          You also should recognize that the other side sees (in some cases, in other, pretends to see) abortion as “murder.” That being the case, no degree of rarity is going to satisfy them, or ever even be seen as truly rare. What level of murder is rare “enough?” Well, none, ideally, right?

          Since, unlike the term “on demand,” the term “rare” does nothing for our side, I am happy to let it go.

          • rea

            No, the point about saying “rare”–and this is why Bill Clinton used that formulation–is that the other side not only wants to end the right to abortion–they also want to end the right to use contraception.

            Root canals ought to be safe, legal and rare, too!

          • joe from Lowell

            But I am not a woman’s health care provider. I’m a lawyer. Rights are my business.

            You’re also a citizen.

            Radical free speech, should we see “safe, legal and rare” as its proper place in our scheme of rights?

            Speaking doesn’t mean something terrible has happened to you.

            Once you concede “rare” as a goal, you open all sorts of questions about minimization.

            First of all, stating that we want as few women as possible to have unintended pregnancies is not “conceding” something to the other side. It should be an expression of our core ideas, if women’s empowerment over their reproductive lives is actually what we stand for. This is not something we should be treating as scary, and not something we should be back on our heels about, responding to the other side as they define the value of rarity the way they want to.

            You also should recognize that the other side sees (in some cases, in other, pretends to see) abortion as “murder.” That being the case, no degree of rarity is going to satisfy them, or ever even be seen as truly rare.

            So what? This isn’t about satisfying them.

            Since, unlike the term “on demand,” the term “rare” does nothing for our side

            Arguing that women should be empowered to avoid unwanted pregnancies does nothing for our side? I gotta disagree there.

      • sharculese

        The point is that ‘rare’ stigmatizes abortion in unnecessary ways. If we can prevent pregnancies in the first place, that’s ideal. If we don’t, and there are abortions, that’s not a thing we freak out over.

        Saying it doesn’t matter if abortion is rare doesn’t detract from the importance preventing pregnancy, except maybe to the assholes at National Campaign.

        • philadelphialawyer

          Yes, that’s right.

        • JL

          This, exactly.

        • joe from Lowell

          If we can prevent pregnancies in the first place, that’s ideal.

          You just acknowledged that you want them to be rare, you know.

      • philadelphialawyer

        Every abortion means that a woman HAS control of her reproductive life.

        I leave all reproductive choice to the individual woman. She can have sex or not. She can use contraception or not. She can have an abortion or not.

        As for “unwanted pregnancies,” I want women to have the option to decide, at any point, that they are “unwanted.” Naturally, I am in favor of universally available birth control, but not because of some desire to keep abortion “rare,” but so that women who prefer contraception to an abortion have that choice ( ie of not getting pregnant in the first place).

        • joe from Lowell

          Every abortion means that a woman HAS control of her reproductive life.

          Except for getting pregnant when she didn’t want to.

          With certain notable exceptions – like getting pregnant when she didn’t want to be pregnant – every abortion means that a woman has control of her reproductive life.

        • joe from Lowell

          To be precise, every abortion means that a woman is working to regain control of her reproductive life.

      • Anonymous

        Every abortion means that a woman lost control of her reproductive life.

        No. Sometimes contraceptives fuck up, and so on. I didn’t “lose control over [my] reproductive life” if I have an abortion; I’m taking control.

        That’s why “abortions on demand” is a phrase I’ll gladly support, and “safe, legal, and rare” a phrase I’ll reject for getting the fundamentals wrong, even if the intent is (maybe) a good one.

        • joe from Lowell

          No. Sometimes contraceptives fuck up, and so on.

          And when they do, the person using them has lost control of her reproductive life.

          Sometimes brakes fuck up and so on. When that happens, the driver has lost control of his car.

          A person uses contraception because that person has made the decision to avoid pregnancy. When the contraception “fucks up and so on,” they are losing that ability to choose.

          • Anonymous

            No. Other options are available. Choices aren’t lost.

    • That a woman can demand an abortion, and get one, without any showing of anything else, eg medical necessity,

      Point of order: From a clinical standpoint a woman who is pregnant and wants an abortion gets you medical necessity.

    • Lurker

      On a philosophical level, I disagree with you on the merits, but not on the conclusion. I support free, accessible abortion in the US, but only for pragmatic reasons.

      Woman’s right to abortion is not absolute. While the fetus is not a person, it is a living being on the continuum between a human being and a mindless bunch of cells. Just like primates and other higher mammals (e.g. dolphins) have some rights and independent value, a fetus has some independent value, although that value is not as high as its mother’s. Abortion means killing such being, and such action needs to have some justification, the need for justification growing while the pregnancy nears its term. Otherwise the abortion is morally wrong.

      In the US, it is clear that no regulation of abortion is possible, unless we want to prevent many abortions that are completely justified in any sense. Thus, we must rely on the opinion of the woman that a justification for abortion exists. However, this is just a tactical point of view, necessary in the current circumstances. There is no need to raise it on a philosophical pedestal, because the train of thought you use will have many unacceptable consequences, if you follow it through.

  • sharculese

    available only at participating Happy Good Funtime Abortions and Tanning

    Why is the age of consent higher for tanning salons than for abortion? – Actual thing anti-choicers say all the fucking time.

    • rea

      Because no one ever got cancer from an abortion?

      • mds

        Au contraire, mon frère. Abortion has given lots of women breast cancer, as I can prove with numerous rigorous scientific studies I keep on special little bookshelves in my rectum.

        • the original spencer

          Damn, I guess IKEA designers are more clever than I realized.

  • wengler

    Hey now! No dude I’ve ever known has ever gone into a Planned Parenthood and demanded an abortion. Guys are just better than that.

    • JL

      I know trans dudes who have gone into Planned Parenthood and demanded an abortion.

      I’m sure the anti-choicers don’t think they count as dudes, though, though. Somehow I don’t see most of them as trans equality activists.

  • herr doktor bimler

    To quote from a NZ ‘varsity capping magazine* — the argument would just go away if we talked about “Abortion on Polite Request” instead.

    * Masskerade, 1975.

  • DrDick

    You know where they have forced abortions? In the Bible, motherfuckers! It is required for women suspected of adultery in the Old Testament (Numbers 5:12-29).

  • cpinva

    “*available only at participating Happy Good Funtime Abortions and Tanning”

    conveniently located next to the Ethical Suicide Parlors, an operating subsidiary of the Obamacare Death Panels.

    bluntly stated, everything we acquire is by “demand”, or we wouldn’t get it. medical procedures are no different than any other product or service, and no one should have to apologize for demanding them, especially not to someone who’s business it utterly isn’t.

    • sharculese

      Are the Ethical Suicide Parlors locate next to Howard Johnson’s?

  • Shakezula

    It is a fairly feeble attempt to take advantage of confusion about what makes medical necessity. For a number of medical procedures the first question is: Does the patient want this procedure? If yes the next question: Does the patient NEED the procedure (is she pregnant)? If yes, you’ve got your medical necessity so far is your provider is concerned.

    This is the case for birth control services that require a script (eg the pill) or a procedure (vasectomy).

    The people who want to make on demand a bad thing want to pretend that abortion allows the patient to cheat on the “normal” process of receiving medical care and strong arm her way into the stirrups.

    So maybe some fun could be had shifting the talk to medical necessity, just to watch them sputter. “Waah! We mean the OTHER kind of medical necessity!!”

    • Anonymous

      Good point on the “cheating” angle. Damn women get to fuck people and then if their slut pills don’t work–they get to “cheat” and not have to suffer the baby! No fair! No fair!!

      • True. But I was thinking more of the disingenuous idea that abortions were in a special category of services that weren’t subject to the “test” of medical necessity. They are, it just isn’t as stringent as the “test” for something like brain surgery.

        Note that there’s another way medical necessity gets discussed – from the insurance carrier’s point of view, which is based on clinical necessity + does the carrier want to pay for it and if so, how often? But even there some services have a much lower threshold than others. Still not helpful to the totalitarian who is trying to confuse the issue.

  • Joe

    Welcome to LGM. Good luck.

    I welcome Julia Sweeney’s new book generally, but the “Pussy” chapter [a person looked like Big Pussy from The Sopranos) in which her mother-in-law talks about her illegal abortion in 1960 is particularly noteworthy. Sweeney notes in passing that she herself had an abortion, which is notable in itself, and the contrast between her legal abortion and that is telling.

  • Great blog here! Also your web site loads up fast!
    What host are you using? Can I get your affiliate link
    to your host? I wish my website loaded up as quickly as yours lol

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