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March 2

[ 31 ] March 2, 2013 |

Happy independence, Texas.

It’s almost criminal that this song wasn’t played over the credits of the final episode of Friday Night Lights…

…[Erik]. In light of yesterday’s exposure of paid Malaysian agent and Texas nationalist Josh Treviño, I was reminded of this exchange. The first time I ever got attacked by big conservative sites was when I noted at my old site that Texas had committed Treason in Defense of Slavery on two separate occasions. Treviño went ballistic. Like any good historian, I went to the historiography. As is the case with most things he’s written over the years, his original attack no longer exists. I think my rebuttal holds up pretty well 4 years later.

Comments (31)

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  1. Thom says:

    Or as Erik would say, happy Treason in Defense of Slavery Day.

    Great song.

  2. Clark says:

    If it had been an HBO series, it would have.

  3. c u n d gulag says:

    Not only is it Texas Independence Day, it’s also the day I became independent from my Mom’s womb, 55 years ago (the old speed limit/double-nickels).

    And I was born on my Mom’s 26th birthday, so she’s 81 today! I was her 10 pound present.

    I’ll be making a special dinner for us tonight.

  4. Karen says:

    Happy Birthday to my home state and to c u n d gulag and his mom!

  5. Timb says:

    I was drug to the Alamo once and, as explained to one my colleagues how there were no good guys at the Alamo, I got some strange looks from the nice docents. Weird experience. Almost as weird as the transparently idiotic Trevino’s career path

  6. Incontinential Buttocks says:

    Finally got the chance to tour the Texas State Capitol a couple years ago. The tour was all about the glorious Texas Revolution. Not a word was spoken about slavery. For those who haven’t been, the building is festooned with paintings and statues of relevance to the mythical tale of Texas independence. These are described in loving detail by the tour guide. Meanwhile, on these same walls, placed in seemingly random order, are pictures of the membership of each Texas legislature. To the careful viewer who notes the dates on them, they tell a very important story about race in Texas that no tour guide will mention: African American faces suddenly show up in the late 1860s and then disappear again, quite rapidly, over the course of the 1870s-1890s.

  7. In memory of my Texan ancestor, who deserted the Texas Rifles during the Civil War after being in arrears of pay for two week.

  8. Vance Maverick says:

    As one might guess from my last name, my patrilineal ancestors were mixed up in a lot of this. (Samuel A. Maverick voted against secession, but his sons fought for the Confederacy.) Being an exceptionally naive child, I was excited to learn about their prominence, but managed not to learn what the point of it all had been. Quite recently I said to my mother, “I hadn’t realized that Texas seceded twice for slavery!”, and she laughed in agreement — perhaps something that might have been emphasized when I was trying to learn about it back in the day.

    • Timb says:

      Indiana has digitized its civil war regiment rolls and I was able to see, for the first time in family memory, what regiment my great, great grandfather fought in. I always hoped he was part of the Iron Brigrade, but not a lot of those guy returned to have families. His discharge papers are still slightly legible and stored in the old family Bible

  9. Joseph Slater says:

    One of my very favorite songs of all time / ever.

  10. Melissa says:

    James McMurtry is Larry’s son, right?

  11. The Pale Scot says:

    IMHO, James is one of the greatest songwriters alive today. Everyone should pick up In the Aughts, his live album, Rachel’s Song, No More Buffalo, etc.

    • Erik Loomis says:

      Also Childish Things.

      • Joseph Slater says:

        If I had to pick my very favorite James McMurtry albums, they would be: “Where’d You Hide the Body” (“Levelland,” “Rachel’s Song,” and a bunch of other great stuff); “”Too Long in the Wasteland” (his first); “Childish Things,” and “Just Us Kids” (the most recent one). Although there also some great stuff on “It Had to Happen,” “Candyland,” and “Walk Between the Raindrops.”

        He actually has two live albums, “Live in Aught ’03″ and “Live in Europe.” You can also find some cool solo/acoustic live stuff on record company samplers. Comparing the solo acoustic version of “Too Long in the Wasteland” with the almost heavy metal version on “Live in Aught 3″ is fun.

  12. It’s a celebration of special-ness.

  13. cpinva says:

    this seems to be a common procedure, amongst the conservarati:

    As is the case with most things he’s written over the years, his original attack no longer exists.

    history is just disappeared, as though it never existed. one g. bush springs quickly to mind, the “disappeared” president. it’s considered poor taste, amongst the beltway village idiot set, to bring the fact of his existence up, in decent conversation. fainting couches will be used.

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