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“Scientifically Undisputed?”

[ 21 ] March 16, 2012 |

One thing about the War on Women is that Republicans seems to feel that it entitles them to not only lie a lot but to embed these lies in legislative enactments.

Comments (21)

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  1. ralphdibny says:

    Of course, these are the same people who tell us that climate change is disputed science. Add “the scientific method” to the long, long list of “things Republicans don’t understand.”

    • DrDick says:

      It has become scientifically undisputed that Republicans (and conservatives generally) have never encountered reality, but insist on creating their own (which is why they are getting their own entry in the DSM-V).

  2. Murc says:

    Something I’m genuinely curious about, although I could just be ill-informed: what’s to stop doctors from giving their required speeches and/or handing over the required materiel, and then immediately following it up by saying “I just lied to you. I was compelled by law to do so, but as a doctor I urge you to disregard my previous statements. They were untrue, but I’m forced to utter them in order to not lose my medical license.”

    Serious question. Could he be fined? Arrested? And what the hell would that court case look like?

    • Malaclypse says:

      S/he could find her home and work address, along with what school her child attends, up on an Operation Rescue web site.

    • DocAmazing says:

      Depends how the law reads. Medical licenses are granted state-by-state. It would not be unheard-of for a particularly wingnutty state functionary or nettled Jesus freak to send a shill into a gynecologist’s office and solicit just such a conversation, then report the doc to the state medical board or equivalent, and the doc ends up having to defend her license and pay fines, or whatever the terms of the law are. Bonus points if the doc get s to be part of a big test case: whoopee, her seventy-hour week is now extended by time spent with attorneys and in courtrooms.

      So: An overworked person gets a whole lot more work in the best-case scenario; a person who has patients that rely on her is fired in the worst-case scenario; throw in fines for flavor.

    • proverbialleadballoon says:

      doesn’t the hippocratic oath demand that the doctor do his/her best for the health of the patient? informing them that ‘this is all bullshit’ is demanded if the doctor knows better, medically, no?

      • Murc says:

        The Hippocratic Oath isn’t legally enforceable, and is subject to both laws and regulations.

        Someone with a medical degree who goes wacky later in life and starts telling his patients about the healing power of crystals rather than preforming surgery is still following the Hippocratic Oath as best he’s able to. The state board is still probably gonna yank his license and he can probably be successfully sued for medical malpractice.

        • rea says:

          Not only is the oath not legally enforceable, it’s archaic, not to mention antiabortion:

          I swear by Apollo Physician and Asclepius and Hygieia and Panaceia and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant:

          To hold him who has taught me this art as equal to my parents and to live my life in partnership with him, and if he is in need of money to give him a share of mine, and to regard his offspring as equal to my brothers in male lineage and to teach them this art—if they desire to learn it—without fee and covenant; to give a share of precepts and oral instruction and all the other learning to my sons and to the sons of him who has instructed me and to pupils who have signed the covenant and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but no one else.

          I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment; I will keep them from harm and injustice.

          I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect. Similarly I will not give to a woman an abortive remedy. In purity and holiness I will guard my life and my art.

          I will not use the knife, not even on sufferers from stone, but will withdraw in favor of such men as are engaged in this work.

          Whatever houses I may visit, I will come for the benefit of the sick, remaining free of all intentional injustice, of all mischief and in particular of sexual relations with both female and male persons, be they free or slaves.

          What I may see or hear in the course of the treatment or even outside of the treatment in regard to the life of men, which on no account one must spread abroad, I will keep to myself, holding such things shameful to be spoken about.

          If I fulfill this oath and do not violate it, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and art, being honored with fame among all men for all time to come; if I transgress it and swear falsely, may the opposite of all this be my lot.

          • proverbialleadballoon says:

            well, the hippocratic oath might be archaic now, but for a couple thousand years, that’s a pretty excellent oath. isn’t there a modern equivalent that doctors must uphold?

            • malraux says:

              For my wife’s med school class, they made up their own. But no, such things aren’t particularly enforceable, anymore than your specific wedding vows are legally enforceable.

  3. c u n d gulag says:

    This lie about abortion and breast cancer is right up there with masturbating will give you hairy palms.

    It this were true, Gillette would have be selling Fusion hand-shavers.

    And they would be marketed towards Conservative bloggers, and trolls on Liberal site.

  4. proverbialleadballoon says:

    what does the american cancer society know about cancer, anyway?

  5. Warren Terra says:

    The Texas Observer has a harrowing cover story about one woman’s ordeal with one of these Mandatory Doctor Lecture laws – including the false breast cancer claim.

  6. Sirius Lunacy says:

    “It is also undisputed that the earlier a woman has a first full-term pregnancy, the lower her risk of breast cancer becomes”

    I suspect the next bill they introduce will make it legal to rape 12 year old girls… you know, to protect them from breast cancer.

  7. Njorl says:

    You may not be entitled to your own facts, but evidently, you can legislate them.

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