Home / General / North Dakota bans something not being taught in its schools because parents are concerned that political bias may intrude on the education of their children

North Dakota bans something not being taught in its schools because parents are concerned that political bias may intrude on the education of their children

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I’m not 100% sure that North Dakota actually exists outside of a Coen brothers’ script, but on the off chance that this is a “real” “world” story, here you go:

Gov. Doug Burgum on Friday, Nov. 12, signed into law a bill that bans the teaching of critical race theory in North Dakota’s public K-12 schools.

State senators sent the bill to Burgum’s desk with a 38-9 vote Friday after a House vote of 76-16 on Thursday.

Critical race theory is not taught in North Dakota schools, but Sen. Donald Schaible, R-Mott, said the bill was a preventative measure.

“The bill is more preemptive to try to make sure that it doesn’t come to our schools,” Schaible said Friday.

The bill defines critical race theory as “the theory that racism is not merely the product of learned individual bias or prejudice, but that racism is systemically embedded in American society and the American legal system to facilitate racial inequality.”

That would seem to ban the teaching of American history in general, and a whole lot of other topics, but whatever!

Multiple senators on Friday acknowledged that the controversy over critical race theory, which is a hot button issue for many conservatives today, is something that was created with political motivation to try to control how race is talked about in schools.

Bismarck Republican Sen. Nicole Poolman, who’s a high school English teacher, said the fear surrounding critical race theory in schools was indeed manufactured, but North Dakota should still take action to assuage parents’ concerns.

“If we can do something to reassure parents that in public schools we are not having a political agenda, then I think that we should do that,” Poolman said. “The fear and the outrage are very real, even if I may believe that fear and outrage was manufactured.”

This is like a moral panic over moral panics, which seems kinda postmodern, although that’s probably banned too.

Now I agree that children should not be indoctrinated into some politically biased ideology, which is probably why it’s just safest to teach them that America is the greatest country in the world because God gave us the Constitution, since these are simply well-known facts, not ideological bias of a particularly nonsensical type.

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