Home / General / The Trump Administration’s Incompetence Is Exceeded Only By Its Malevolence, And Vice Versa

The Trump Administration’s Incompetence Is Exceeded Only By Its Malevolence, And Vice Versa

Comments
/
/
/
197 Views

C3Pkt64UEAQ_U98[Cartoon by Pat Bagley]

To pick up on Dave’s theme below, it’s great that major public policy is now being implemented by a cross between George Wallace and Michael Brown:

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Department of Homeland Security leadership saw the final details shortly before the order was finalized, government officials said.

Friday night, DHS arrived at the legal interpretation that the executive order restrictions applying to seven countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen — did not apply to people who with lawful permanent residence, generally referred to as green card holders.

The White House overruled that guidance overnight, according to officials familiar with the rollout. That order came from the President’s inner circle, led by Stephen Miller and Steve Bannon. Their decision held that, on a case by case basis, DHS could allow green card holders to enter the US.
There had been some debate whether green card holders should be even allowed to board international flights.

It was decided by the Department of Homeland Security they could fly to the US and would be considered on a case-by-case basis after passing a secondary screening.

But the guidance sent to airlines on Friday night, obtained by CNN, said clearly, “lawful permanent residents are not included and may continue to travel to the USA.”

As of Saturday afternoon, Customs and Border Protection continued to issue the same guidance to airlines as it did Friday, telling airlines that fly to the US that green card holders can board planes to the US but they may get extra scrutiny on arrival, according to an airline official.

Before the President issued the order, the White House did not seek the legal guidance of the Office of Legal Counsel, the Justice Department office that interprets the law for the executive branch. A source said the executive order did not follow the standard agency review process that’s typically overseen by the National Security Council, though the source couldn’t specifically say if that included the decision to not have the order go through the Office of Legal Counsel.

Ben Wittes has much more. Trump’s ineptitude makes this racist order more legally vulnerable as well as less popular, not that this is much consolation.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • Murc

    I suppose the question is, are they going to get more competent at this as they go along, or is this the baseline for the next four years?

    Also, I understand why you’re linking to him in this context, but seriously, fuck Ben Wittes. That article is full of disgusting apologia for the Bush Administrations’ cruelty and malevolence in the service of knocking down the Trump Administrations same.

    • JohnT

      Logically they’ll learn some of the basics, which is why it’s so crucial to frame them as incompetent asshats right now. The rapidly-acquired aura of ridiculous incompetence has been the death of those far-rightists who got into government in Europe. Well, that and their wonderful tendency to fight amongst themselves because they are small, angry people all the way down.

      • DrDick

        You give them too much credit. There is no evidence that Trump is even capable of learning anything.

        • howard

          no, but it’s not impossible that bannon and miller will.

    • If they don’t take Bannon and some of the other goriloids out, and change their work flow, they will not last six months. I’m assuming enough GOP Congressmen and Senators realize their party will evaporate in the 2018 elections if they don’t do sonething about Trump.

      • Manny Kant

        That is a very optimistic assumption.

        • I bet democrats will take both the house and senate in 2018 unless trump changes very fast. We do have to factor in democrat incompetence and tendency to drift too far to the left, but they would gave to literally cut off their legs to lose next time.

          • howard

            motivation to vote will determine what happens in 2018: both whether the trump acolytes still believe (between november, 1972 and august, 1974, nixon lost 2/3 of his voters) and whether dem voters will realize the stakes and actually show up in presidential numbers in an off-year.

            • You are already anticipating defeat? If Trump keeps going like he is the GOP will lose. I guess the only way they can win is if unemployment goes down and average wages go up, because people do tend to vote with their wallets.

              When I think of it, oil and gas prices are likely to go up, this will drive an industry boom, and if Trump leaves the solar panel guys alone, the USA will be exporting natural gas and oil products, as well as coal. That will definitely put a kink on things as far as democrats are concerned. Maybe I’ll change my name to Fritz.

          • random

            2018 is an absurdly bad map for the Dems. If they perform flawlessly and DT’s approval is in the low 30’s, they could easily lose seats in the Senate and House even if the elections are fair. And the elections clearly are going to be heavily rigged and rat-fucked.

    • gmack

      Cory Robin’s hypothesis is that the incompetence represents a basic political incoherence. I take this to mean that, in his view, they really don’t have a unified or coherent set of policies or interests they’re trying to pursue. I don’t know whether I buy it, but there is reason for optimism in the idea; it means that it’s not just inexperience or rashness that is leading to these difficulties, but a more fundamental collapse in the conservative coalition.

    • vic rattlehead

      We need to use this to reignite the anti-Bannon protests. Tie all this to him-he’s a fascist rabble rouser and Trump needs to dump him.

    • Jerry Vinokurov

      Also, I understand why you’re linking to him in this context, but seriously, fuck Ben Wittes. That article is full of disgusting apologia for the Bush Administrations’ cruelty and malevolence in the service of knocking down the Trump Administrations same.

      Came here to say this. Ben Wittes is a garbage human being utterly lacking in any moral compass, an apologist for the worst excesses of the security state and proud of it. Fuck him forever.

    • Tom Paine Caucus

      Thirding the Wittes hate. I was appalled over the weekend that people were citing him approvingly. No one who opposes torture should ever cite Ben Wittes, torture apologist. I found the positive references to him over the weekend on Twitter infuriating.

  • Jean-Michel

    And here’s Giuliani on Fox News saying that Trump called him up to ask how he could pull off a Muslim ban that might pass legal muster. I see people theorizing that Giuliani is still pissed about getting kicked to the curb after the election, but I don’t think that’s it. I think he’s just very, very dumb and has no idea that proclaiming this from the rooftops might create problems somewhere down the lne

    • rhino

      Giuliani. Now there’s a guy who earned a long walk off a short pier into the Hudson a *long* time ago.

      In a movement full of shitbirds, Rudy manages to stink worse than most.

      • Nobdy

        I remember when Giuliani was mayor of New York. The liberals hated him for being a terrible authoritarian but he got credit for the big drop in crime (which turns out to have been fortuitous rather than the result of anything he did) and then became the mayor of 9/11, which helped wash away a lot of the outrageous behavior he engaged in. Now he’s gotten older, bitterer, and even more unhinged.

        I’m sure Trump and he have a great relationship. They both treated their wives like used tissues when they were done with them too, so that’s something else they can bond over.

        • BiloSagdiyev

          And, of course, this.

    • Asteroid_Strike_Brexit

      I thought Giuliani was too busy working on cybers or something?

      • N__B

        Forced out in a power play by Barron.

    • vic rattlehead

      He’s not dumb. But I do think he has become increasingly unhinged over the past decade.

      He and Trump actually go back a long way. Longer than the campaign. So I wouldn’t be surprised if he were royally pissed that he was frozen out of Trump’s inner circle (although he is an idiot for expecting loyalty from Trump).

      Republicans are vindictive assholes. But they’re also by nature bootlickers. So I wouldn’t expect him to go scorched earth anti-Trump.

  • rhino

    What a collection of unmitigated assholes.

    The mind fucking boggles.

    Not just stupid, evil as well, and add on incompetent, cowardly, and plain despicable. They are a disgrace, not just to the founding principles (however flawed) of the nation, but to humanity itself. This shit cannot be allowed to stand. This administration has forfeited their right to government. Exactly what this implies, and how it should inform the actions of decent human beings moving forward, I am not sure, but there is no longer a civic obligation to obey the dictates of the Trump administration.

    I live in Canada, I haven’t been back to the country of my birth in 20 years, I had all but decided to renounce my citizenship in protest. Now I’m so fucking angry I am considering driving down there tomorrow so I can join my pitchfork and torch to the rest of you. I am so mad I can’t fucking sleep.

    I hate these fucking shits.

    • anonymous

      Doesn’t Canada have its own Trump-like figure trying to gain power? I heard Kevin O’Leary is trying to gain the leadership of the Tories and then unseat Trudeau.

      Considering that Le Pen, AfD, Wilders, etc. are all on the verge of gaining power, the whole Western liberal order is very fragile.

      • rhino

        O’Leary is an asshole and an idiot, but he’s no Trump. Our true figure is Kelly Leitch, a racist shithead Aunty Thomasina conservative who wants to imitate the Trumpian dog whistles.

        You’re right though, we will be manning our own barricades up here soon enough.

        • Nobdy

          Trump wasn’t really Trump until he was Trump. Remember not long ago he was calling HIllary Clinton fantastic, was staunchly pro-choice, and while he had some awful authoritarian views he hadn’t metastasized until he found out that being a birther would get him the attention he craved.

      • e.a.foster

        Yes good old kevin O’Leary who actually lives in Boston. He’s more American than Canadian.

        Will he win the leadership of the Conservatives? He might. Those running for the leadership are a rather thin group. Should Kevie win the leadership he still has to obtain a seat in Parliament. if there is no vacant seat for him to run in, some one in his Party could resign. That would trigger a bi election in approx. 6 months. If those in the riding don’t like O’Leary they won’t vote for him and there is a good chance that could happen. Canada was closer to a Trump like leader with Stephen Harper and Canada rejected him and his party. Don’t expect them to welcome them back any time soon. Canada, unlike the Americans have a third major party. if Trudeau “messed up” then there is a better chance that the NDP would be elected than a party led by Kevin O’Leary. Canada doesn’t have voter suppression. We have a growing immigrant population and they do go out and vote. We also have a large First Nation’s population and they won’t be happy with a guy like Kevin O’Leary. In a number of places in the country their vote really, really matters.

        • anonymous

          Harper is more the GWB of Canada than Trump IMO.

          Now, as you know, the US has a huge political racial polarization with Whites overwhelmingly voting for Repugs as the “White Party”. I believe this phenomenon exists with the Tories? That is Whites favor the Tories while non-Whites favor the Grits although perhaps not to the extent in the USA.

          An O’Leary or Leitch could run that same playbook to racially polarize Canadian politics making Tories the “White Party” and win just like Trump did here and Le Pen is trying to do in France.

          • Warren Terra

            Harper was much more malign, destructive, and effective, controlling for starting point, than was George W Bush. Bush blowing up the middle east and neglecting Katrina skews our perceptions of him, as does the collapse of a bipartisan real estate bubble, but the fact is that for various reasons he didn’t accomplish a lot of lasting damage to the nature of the country. Harper was much more dangerous.

      • Manju

        Doesn’t Canada have its own Trump-like figure trying to gain power?

        Rob Ford is dead. Long live Rob Ford.

    • DrDick

      I actually find this combination of total incompetence and immense evil rather frightening. It really has the potential for huge (totally avoidable) disaster.

      • muddy

        Especially since the alternative is also frightening. Trump is scary because you don’t know what he’ll do. Pence is frightening because you do.

        • Lurking Canadian

          I begin to long for Pence. He’s predictable gerrymander-and-voter suppression evil. It’s looking increasingly likely that Trump/Bannon are round-up-my-enemies-in-camps evil.

        • DrDick

          Pretty much.

  • DamnYankees

    This was not stupidity; bannon knew what he was doing. Because Bannon is not stupid. He knows the value of precedent. He knows that if you can strip people of their rights now – even green card holders – it becomes easier next time.

    So they issue this executive order which is relatively narrow in one sense, but they make sure it covers a relatively extreme category in another sense. So that next time, when the order effects more people – perhaps less hated people – they have the precedent they need to take away the rights of all green card holders.

    Of which, by the way, there are more than 10 million, many of whom are the spouses and parents of American citizens.

    • Nobdy

      Scott Adams agrees with you! (Caution! Scott Adams)

      Trump has flooded the playing field. You don’t know where to aim your outrage. He’s creating so many opportunities for disagreement that it’s mentally exhausting. Literally. He’s wearing down the critics, replacing their specific complaints with entire encyclopedias of complaints. And when Trump has created a hundred reasons to complain, do you know what impression will be left with the public?

      He sure got a lot done.

      Even if you don’t like it.

      In only a few days, Trump has made us question what-the-hell every other president was doing during their first weeks in office. Were they even trying?

      I do not.

      There’s a saying in the legal field: Bad cases make bad law. And specifically I know from my experience as a litigator that if you’re going to go in front of a judge with a case of first impression whose precedent matters a lot to your client…you want to go with the best case possible. By being hamfisted and blatantly unconstitutional you increase the chances of a sharp rebuke by the courts that does more harm to you than a narrower ruling might. A court might, for example, impose a stringent test or specific procedural steps required to strip a green card holder of their right to re-enter the country based on country of origin, or might say that it can’t be done at all except on a case by case basis.

      This was done the way it was for shock value and intimidation not to create the best possible precedent.

      Of course all that might not matter depending on who is on the supreme court when this case or one like it winds its way up there.

      • anonymous

        Odds makers are making William Pryor the favorits for Trump’s SCOTUS nominee next week to replace Scalia.

        • e.a.foster

          wonder if they will show his picture when he posed nude on the badpuppy website. We’ve seen all the Supreme Court Justices in their robes. This will be the first we get to see naked with a sort of hard on. It’ll be great with the family crowd of evangelicals. Oh, and he isn’t too crazy about the LGBTQ people either. Some have even described him as homophobic.

          So looking forward to his confirmation hearings if Trump nominates him. Ought to keep his good friend Jeff Sessions happy. Perhaps they can get a room together in Washington.

        • Shalimar

          I have seen Pryor referred to in several articles this past week as “the early favorite”, which strongly suggests the administration liked him at one time but is searching for a better alternative now.

      • efgoldman

        if you’re going to go in front of a judge with a case of first impression whose precedent matters a lot to your client…you want to go with the best case possible. By being hamfisted and blatantly unconstitutional you increase the chances of a sharp rebuke by the courts

        Who is defending the suits on behalf of the maladministration? There’s no AG, there’s no solicitor general. I assume most of the holdovers have been fired, and the remaining ones wouldn’t take on this steaming pile of pig shit. WH counsel’s office?

        • Nobdy

          Who has two thumbs and a law degree from Paul Campos’ favorite law school?

          THIS GUY!

        • Manny Kant

          Did all the U.S. Attorneys get fired?

      • Nobdy

        It’s late. I should have said the more popular formulation: Bad facts make bad law, but the rest of it stands.

      • sigaba

        I won’t click the link, thanks. I thought Scott was clever about 15 years ago.

        Trump has flooded the playing field. You don’t know where to aim your outrage. He’s creating so many opportunities for…

        This is why engineers should never be let anywhere near civil administration. They don’t care what the fuck anybody does or who gets hurt, all they seem to think about is wether it works or not. And wether it works is considered a virtue unto itself, and they pat themselves on the back for their “objectivity.” Scott Adams is what you would get if you crossed Pete Thiel with a rat trained to draw a straight line.

        • I’m an engineer, and I’m not like that. Lawyers and college professors are much more dangerous. Look at the mess they’ve made.

          • MAJeff

            bless yer heart

          • Origami Isopod

            LOL

        • N__B

          Adams isn’t an engineer.

          • Adams isn’t an engineer.

            He is why software “engineers” should never be let anywhere near civil administration.

            • random

              The healthcare.gov rollout fiasco indicates that competent software engineers are going to be indispensable to governance going forward. That thing purrs like a kitten now.

              If it had worked right out of the bat we probably could have mitigated a small amount of the 2014 damage.

              • econoclast

                In the media, the Democrats were riding high because the Republicans shot themselves in the dick by closing down the federal government. And then healthcare.gov happened. I’m not sure how much these things matter, but it was very bad timing.

        • David Chop

          I have to jump in here in defense of my fellow engineers.

          1) We care a great deal that no one gets hurt.
          2) Scott Adams is not an engineer.

          You’re right about the don’t let them near civil administration bit though.

      • tahfromslc

        I agree. The chaos it is causing is a feature, not a bug.

    • The Lorax

      I’ll be at LAX tomorrow to protest. Maybe I’ll see some commenters from here.

      • sigaba

        I have to work. Do yourself a favor and take the Flyaway bus or the green line.

      • UncleEbeneezer

        Heading down now. I’ll be in a faded yellow BLM shirt and black baseball cap. Come say hello if you see me.

    • That order will be overruled, and it may lead to Bannon being taken to the White House basement for a beating.

    • Dennis Orphen

      He knows the value of precedent. He knows that if you can strip people of their rights now – even green card holders – it becomes easier next time.

      Exactly this.

      How do you implement a Holocaust? You do it in steps.

      First, make a list. Nothing more. The compilers of the list don’t have a problem with this. They aren’t participating in a Holocaust. They are just making a list.

      Second, give the list to law enforcement and make a public show of questioning these people by visiting at their homes and workplaces (maybe to bring them to HQ for questioning, maybe just a field visit). Don’t arrest anyone, just sow the seeds of suspicion of the targets in the community at large. The law enforcement officers involved in this won’t have any problems doing this. They aren’t sending people off the the death camps (which don’t even exist yet). They are just questioning some suspicious people. Why are they suspicious? Because they are on the list of course (and everyone is probably guilty of something in the eyes of an authoritarian).

      Third, you start arresting people. Dissention and opposition to this is minimized by the non-targeted members of the community at large perception of the targets as guilty of something (why else would they be questioned by the police?). And they aren’t being sent off the the death camps (the camps don’t exist yet anyway).

      Fourth, Now that you have a large number of people in custody, you have to do something about it, right? Why not send them off to concentration camps? They must be guilty of something, right? Why else would they be in custody?

  • name-already-taken

    not that this is much consolation

    Actually, I think what he’s doing is throwing the frogs straight in the boiling water – and we’re jumping out. If he had been slower and more subtle, people might have gotten used to it. As long as he doesn’t start sending in troops, or get control of the courts, I think we can win this.

    • Karen24

      I think you’re right. Other evil regimes took their time and practiced before launching straight into evil. and got the benefit of the doubt on smaller things first. The Nazis and Soviets were incompetent at the beginning too, but they took their time and practiced. Trump isn’t getting that luxury. They’re getting pushback from day one. Part of this is modern instant communications, part of it is that they didn’t take power during the complete collapse of the previous regime, and a big part of it is that Trump is an idiot who has never worked to get better at a single thing in his entire life.

      • humanoid.panda

        Most importantly: while the Bolsheviks are another story, both the Nazis and Fascists faced no effective opposition. This is clearly not the situation right now.

  • anonymous

    Three countries that are not on the ban list are:
    Saudi Arabia
    Egypt
    United Arab Emirates

    I have heard it is because Trump has business ties. But regardless, it is interesting. What would happen if Trump had added those countries to the list? Would there be major diplomatic fallout as those are strong and key Arab allies in a way that places like Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen are not?

    • efgoldman

      Three countries that are not on the ban list are:

      Yeah. Where all the 9/11 hijackers were from.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        The American public’s most heartbreaking? infuriating? point of ignorance. CURSE YOU, SADDAM HUSSEIN!!

      • UnderTheSun

        No, one, Ziad Samir Jarrah on United Airlines Flight 93, came from Lebanon.

    • e.a.foster

      Neither is Turkey or Indonesia Both countries do business with Trump’s business organization. Gee Trump was talking about extremists chopping off heads> if I’m not mistaken the “terrorists” in Indonesia did the same thing.

      Don’t expect to see any country with a Trump hotel on any type of list which might impact the “bottom line” of the Trump business empire.

      oh wait there is a third country in the middle east which didn’t make Trump’s list and it has his hotel’s also, just forget the name

    • JohnT

      The obvious countermove for ISIS if they do have any Pakistani, Turkish or Saudi extreme sympathisers in the US is to get one of those to pull off an attack, which would both make Trump look like an idiot and force him to make some much harder choices about whether to piss off key allies.

    • What’s really odd is putting Iran on the list. The Iranians are Shiites, and they don’t do terrorism. Trump seems to be unduly influenced by the Israelis.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        You have to understand GOP-think. Anybody who shot at our troops in Iraq is “the terrorists.” Anybody who supplied them intel or wepaons to take out our tanks is “the terrorists.” Any funny furriner who doesn’t do as we say is “the terrorists.” And 1979 shall dictate our Iraq foreign policy until the end of time, because they embarrased us and hurt our fee fees.

      • veleda_k

        Trump doesn’t need to be influenced by Israel to be stupid about the Middle East (or in general). He can do it just fine on his own.

    • TopsyJane

      Would there be major diplomatic fallout as those are strong and key Arab allies in a way that places like Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen are not?

      Short answer, yes. Trump’s business ties are never absent from his mind, but all of these countries have leverage the others don’t.

    • Manny Kant

      The 7 countries are the visa waiver exception (I think it’s called that?) countries. Basically, if you’re a citizen of a visa waiver country (a country whose citizens don’t need a Visa to enter the US), but you’ve visited one of those seven countries, you have to go through the normal Visa review process, because they want to make sure you’re not cavorting with terrorists. Trump and Bannon just took that list and used it for this much more nonsensical policy.

  • McAllen

    Reports on Twitter are saying the CPB is defying the stay and deporting people.

    • tonycpsu

      Yeah, this is not good. Just a week in and we already have law enforcement agents ignoring legal orders and claiming that their loyalty is to Trump. He hasn’t even had a chance to install more than a handful of his own people — this is all coming from the blind, fanatical loyalty he inspired with his campaign.

      This could get really messy really quick, which is precisely what Bannon wants.

      • efgoldman

        This could get really messy really quick, which is precisely what Bannon wants.

        And when CPB managers get hauled into court for contempt? It isn’t Bannonazi who’ll go in the clink.

        • sigaba

          Airports concourses are great for nonviolent action. All you really have to do is walk through the cordons, ignore the commands to stop and if you make it onto the floor they have to shut down the whole terminal for hours.

    • Nobdy

      Twitter reports should be taken with a grain of salt, of course, but it wouldn’t shock me.

      It took Trump 8 days to trash rule of law in the United States, which is pretty quick if you think about it.

      The American institutions that were supposed to make the Trump election something less than fascism better get moving soon or the ship will be sunk before the bilge pumps start pumping.

      • sigaba

        It took Trump 8 days to trash rule of law in the United States, which is pretty quick if you think about it.

        How many CPB agents are committed to the rule of law, and how many will do as they please as long as the check comes every Thursday? :(

    • PotemkinMetropolitanRegion

      Jesus, if true, a real full-blown constitutional crisis within a week of inauguration.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        (shake fist) BUT HE’S SAVIN’ MURKA!!

        The awful things these people do are only limited by how scared they are. And they’re terrified.

    • Origami Isopod
  • Denverite

    Before the President issued the order, the White House did not seek the legal guidance of the Office of Legal Counsel, the Justice Department office that interprets the law for the executive branch.

    I knew it! There was a pretty obvious mis-cite in the executive order. and I thought that either someone was going to get fired, or it wasn’t run by OLC. My money was on the latter.

    Btw, the fact that Trump is issuing executive orders without running them by the lawyers is terrifying. He’s completely disregarding all institutional checks and balances. Bush didn’t even dream of doing that. We all might die very, very soon.

    • Nobdy

      I’m not sure how you get from not running executive orders by lawyers to everyone dying, but it’s definitely not what I would call “good.”

    • JohnT

      I presume Denverite’s angle that someone so utterly heedless that they send out an executive order without OLC review (which is at least as bad as publishing a newspaper without editing or writing a contract without a lawyer) is heedless enough to hit the little red button with his little orange finger.

      • rhino

        You do know it’s not that easy to launch nukes, right?

        • JohnT

          Based on some stuff I have read recently it’s not that hard either. The President has unrestricted authority to launch on his own say so without official provocation or warning (something the Democrats are apparently trying to legislate against. Apparently the launch order could be countermanded by the SecDef but all other participants in the chain to launch are apparently thoroughly trained not to question but to execute.

          • Thlayli

            … all other participants in the chain to launch are apparently thoroughly trained not to question but to execute.

            The thought process being: “If I ever actually do get the order, then the game is already over, so my refusal to launch this one missile won’t change anything.”

            Which, up until last week, was a reasonable assumption.

  • howard

    i go back and forth between thinking i don’t see how this goes on for four years (or even, god forbid, eight) and thinking these people are just going to destroy anything resembling democracy and the peaceful transfer of power anyhow so markers like four or eight years have limited meaning.

    • e.a.foster

      there are other democracies in the world and they are functioning well and accept refugees, Muslims, and Mexicans. the U.S.A. became a powerful nation following WW II but prior to that it was pretty isolationist and poor. They may well wind up like that again. Besides Las Vegas, what else do they have that can’t be gotten some where else.

      Too many people believed the U.S.A. was the be all and end all. it has never been. It had big poverty and racial divides. Over time the U.S.A. has turned in to the type of country people once fled.

      Expecting more than one person to start filing refugee status in Canada, who lived in the U.S.A. We’ve been good at accepting refugees since the early 1950s and we had 30K Syrians move in last year and we’re all doing well. So just check you guns at the border. We’ll give you a free health card and you’re good to go. We’re big and have two official languages and a whole lot of others that you can learn to speak also. Some bank machines have 6 languages in some areas. Oh and our leader is better looking than the American leader. He’s smarter also.

      • Nobdy

        The thing is, the U.S. is huge and has ALL the guns (and I don’t mean high gun ownership among the population, I mean the strongest military the world has ever seen.) So if it goes fascist that’s not like Belgium going fascist. It’s much much worse. Especially for the country that shares the largest land border in the world with the U.S. How did sharing a border with Nazi Germany work out again?

        our leader is better looking than the American leader. He’s smarter also.

        This has been true for the last 9 days, no doubt, but politics can change.

        Also there are several varieties of foot fungus that are smarter and better looking than the current American leader. It’s not hard to be smarter and prettier than a malformed Cheeto.

        • Dr. Acula

          The thing is, the U.S. is huge and has ALL the guns (and I don’t mean high gun ownership among the population, I mean the strongest military the world has ever seen.) So if it goes fascist that’s not like Belgium going fascist. It’s much much worse.

          Absolutely. This is one of the many things that worries me.

          • Thom

            Yes, and not just for Canada. Invading Mexico is also a US tradition.

      • Manny Kant

        the U.S.A. became a powerful nation following WW II but prior to that it was pretty isolationist and poor.

        No.

        • Origami Isopod

          I don’t know about poor vs. rich, but isolationist? Hell no. Ask any Latin American country.

  • e.a.foster

    When Turnip hired Steve Bannon, the writing was on the wall. Now Turnip is having it written in the sky. No ought to be surprised by any of this.

    Hitler had the Jews as his scape goat, Trump has Muslims and to a lesser extent Mexicans. He has signed his executive order and now American can deal with it. It won’t be good for some major corporations. They can always move to Canada, there is plenty of office space available in Calgary and they have a Muslim Mayor.

    It will not be surprising if he starts his Muslim registery. Hitler did that also. Then he will close Mosques. Hitler closed Temples. Trump will try to co op some Muslim clerics. Lets hope they don’t fall for it like some did in Europe.

    Trump isn’t what one could call a “deep” person. He doesn’t think things through. He has a narrow view of the world and hence this mess he currently has. As to his not consulting with appropriate branches of government, that’s real easy. He is convinced he is smarter than the rest of the population because after all he’s a smart businessman, just ask him.

    • Hells Littlest Angel

      I haven’t heard any right-wingers bring up “2nd Amendment remedies,” lately. I wonder why not?

      • BiloSagdiyev

        “Tyranny” ended on January 20th and Murka is back?

  • shah8

    Wait…

    “legally vulnerable” is not the point. Trump wants to be an autocrat. That means he wants the questions of legality to be irrelevant.

    • Moondog von Superman

      “let John Marshall enforce it”

      • sigaba

        Can we just let Josh Marshall enforce it?

        Somebody really should contrast the anti-elitism of the Jacksonians against the Revolutionary generation with the Trumpers versus the Greatest generation.

        It’s remarkable that the liberal consensus fell completely apart just as the WW2 survivors and their immediate apostles passed from power… It’s like Civil Rights and general non-racist sanity failed to transition from Weber’s charismatic phase to the traditional or legalistic.

  • The Great God Pan

    OT but have people seen this? Apparently Trump has already filed with the FEC for the 2020 election, which means he is technically a candidate and 501(c)(3)s cannot directly criticize him?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/resisterhood/status/825435325535252480

  • anonymous

    I believe that Bannon is orchestrating this to sow discord intentionally rather than stumbling into this via ineptitude.

    He knew there would be blowback and judicial blocks. He knew there would be protests. But he also knew there would be authoritarian followers in govt. And more importantly, he knew the deplorables would be energized.

    Basically Bannon and Trump is setting up opposition to be mowed down while the deplorables cheer on. He is instigating Civil War.

    • Nick056

      Isn’t this just a twist on the “Trump is secret genius on Twitter?” refrain.

      I don’t think Bannon intends for Trump’s popularity to be at 30% by week two, but we could get there.

      He is a fascist, and he is trying to foment war, but I do think this was as much about delivering on a campaign promise in a reckless fashion as anything else.

      He’s not really a super genius. He’s an immoral political operative who got lucky. Luck runs out.

      • McAllen

        It might be that Bannon is a mastermind, and it might be that he’s just flailing. We can’t really know for sure, and either possibility is dangerous and has consequences we need to be prepared for.

      • Thlayli

        He’s not really a super genius. He’s an immoral political operative who got lucky. Luck runs out.

        See: Rove, K.

        • efgoldman

          See: Rove, K

          Also Atwater, L.

          • humanoid.panda

            Or ignoring the morals for a moment, look at Democratic political operatives. Back in 2012, they were geniuses who understood exactly how mold to the electorate with data. Now, they are idiots who relied on data and not what people on the ground were telling them.

      • Origami Isopod

        Isn’t this just a twist on the “Trump is secret genius on Twitter?” refrain.

        Well, you are replying to the concern troll who’s been beating the “Democrats need to forget about civil rights if they want power back” drum around these parts for weeks…

      • Dennis Orphen

        He’s not really a super genius. He’s an immoral political operative who got lucky. Luck runs out.


        Luck has little to do with it.

  • MacK

    I personally can’t stand the guy, and he probably should take some of the advice in this column, but, if you know any Republucan contemplating working for Trump, send it:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/01/trump-administration-jobs/514805/

  • MacK

    Can I point out a couple of ways in which this could be a good thing helpful to the resistance

    • Sessions has not yet been confirmed, and his fingerprints are all over this; Stephen Miller, who apparently drafted the executive order with Bannon was Sessions communications director specialising in condemning muslim immigrants. Who knows, a shit-storm of this magnitude could keep the democrats together and just maybe scare enough Republicans away from backing Sessions. Moreover, by putting the finger of blame on Sessions, it gives wavering Democrats a rationale for standing solid against him.

    • Trump has a major constitutional crisis (crises if you say consider emoluments) just as he’s planning to appoint a proto-facist to the Supreme Court. Consider, Trump is only going to appoint someone so loyal, he’ll be able to testify on hand-size-genital coordination….and someone who absolutely agrees with him. That’s going to be fun when the judge’s conformation hearing comes around. By then at least a few Republican senators will have had to break cover and condemn Trump on this – and presumably other stuff.

    • this is absolutely murdering the Republican’s and Trump’s approval rating. The next poll will be awful – Friday’s before this shit-storm broke was already abysmal:

    “President Donald Trump’s net approval rating dropped by eight points in his first week in the Oval Office, according to daily polls tracked by Gallup.

    On Sunday Jan. 22, two days after being sworn in, 45 percent of respondents said they disapproved of Trump’s job performance and 45 percent approved. By Friday Jan. 27, the percentage who disapproved rose to 50 and percentage who approved dipped to 42.’

    If you combine this with crashing levels of support for repealing Obamacare (84 – 13 percent that Congress should not repeal the ACA until there is a replacement plan in place) – and massive support for Roe v. Wade – 70 – 26 percent, and

    Republicans oppose a Planned Parenthood funding cut 65 – 25 percent.

    Offered four choices on abortion, American voter attitudes are:
    • 28 percent say abortion should be legal in all cases;
    • 36 percent say abortion should be legal in most cases;
    • 22 percent say abortion should be illegal in most cases;
    • 9 percent say abortion should be illegal in all cases.

    and it is fair to say the wheels are coming off the Trump administration and the Republican house and senate majorities very fast indeed. Trump and the Republicans are burning what was a very small amount of political capital at an astonishing pace.

    • efgoldman

      By then at least a few Republican senators will have had to break cover and condemn Trump on this – and presumably other stuff.

      Breath, don’t hold it.
      I’m typing this a couple of hours before the Sunday Showz air. I’m sure some of the usual suspects will be on. So far last night, the three condemnations in the Republiklown caucus have been very weaselly and mealy-mouthed. As we know, some senators have a long history of voicing concerns and doubts, and then voting however Yertle McTurtle needs them to.
      Granny Starver came out almost immediately in favor.

    • junker

      I guess we’ll see now how much the old rules about approval and capital still matter in the age of Trump.

  • LastUniversalCommonAncestor

    By the way, I don’t know if this has been brought up here yet, with all the shit flying around, but Russia just decriminalized domestic violence. Some Red State assemblies are probably taking notes as we speak.

  • MyOhMy

    This kind of reminds me of Trump’s deplorable trip out to the CIA.

    https://warontherocks.com/2017/01/mattis-the-great-mattis-the-exploited/

    “Trump crossed the Potomac and visited the Pentagon to watch Vice President Mike Pence swear in Mattis as secretary of defense and to sign two executive orders. The second of the two actions ends immigration from Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya…

    “Standing over Trump’s left shoulder as he signed this order was Jim Mattis. This all unfolded in the Pentagon’s Hall of Heroes. As Trump signed these orders, he sat in front of the hall’s large mockups of our nation’s highest military award, the Medal of Honor…

    “After Trump signed the immigration order, he handed the folder to Mattis and shook his hand. Mattis held it. They both smiled.”

    Oh, and, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/28/us/politics/trump-immigration-ban-muslims-military.html

    • howard

      Having participated in the betrayal of military translators on day one, mattis has confirmed that there are no adults in the Trump administration.

      • Origami Isopod

        Yeah, so much for “Mad Dog” being the voice of reason we all hoped for.

  • Joe_JP

    Ben Wittes basically says “hey, I support bunch of things you hippie types hate, but even I still find this malevolent and incompetent.”

    • humanoid.panda

      And you know what? It’s fine. There are plenty of bureaucrats who think that way, and we need their help slowing down/derailing shit.

  • BiloSagdiyev

    For a minute there I wondered if this was just a GOP reflex – fighting culture war instead of making policy. At the culture war level, they overreach for something (prayer at the beginning of a city council meeting), knowing full well that it’s going to be smacked down by black-robed judges, (whatever that means) but that’s a feature, not a bug, because then they can whip up even more resentful pity party among the base about them libruhls (shake fist) took away their shiny new toy.

    But then I realized, no, this administration, specifically, this president, is just a loose cannon and egomanaic who thinks expertise is all pompous and frooty and who cares what those nerds think? Those lawyers aren’t smart! If they were smart, they’d be representing all the crime families of NYC and getting rich, like Roy Cohn did! Now there was a smart lawyer!

    Dangerous man, dangerous followers, dangerous times. I can see why those State Dept. folks headed for the exits.

  • black-robed judges, (whatever that means)

    From Wikipedia:

    Until the tenure of Chief Justice John Marshall, all Supreme Court justices wore red robes with ermine trim and full-bottomed wigs, reminiscent of British court dress. Marshall, however, eschewed this formality and began the practice of only wearing a black silk robe, with no wig. In 1994, Chief Justice William Rehnquist added four gold bars (similar in appearance to captain insignia in the US Navy) to each sleeve of his black robe, but the change in his attire (he had been Chief Justice since 1986) was his own innovation and was inspired by a production of the operetta Iolanthe, rather than any historical precedent. His successor, John G. Roberts, chose to stick with the traditional plain black robe.

    See also http://marblehead.wickedlocal.com/article/20151029/NEWS/151025057:

    [T]he Salem Witch Trials […] were presided over by red-robed judges Samuel Sewall and John Hathorne and left 20 dead in its wake.

  • Pingback: [BLOG] Some Sunday links | A Bit More Detail()

  • Origami Isopod

    Both Schama and Kendzior are calling this a coup.

    • JR in WV

      I must confess I don’t know who Schama or Kendzior are, don’t care either, as they appear to be twits using Twitter. I don’t use Twitter, and don’t care much for those who do. Like Trump. Sad, but true.

  • Tracy Lightcap

    Scott,

    Just for the record, the comparison isn’t a “cross between George Wallace and Michael Brown”. It’s more like a cross between Alfred Rosenberg and Julius Streicher. I’m serious; there isn’t much difference between Breitbart News and Der Strumer.

    Iow, the situation calls for examples beyond normal American history.

  • Cora L. Sanchez

    Good day
    Read my testimony!!! Getting ex back after a breakup. Am Cora L. Sanchez 28 from UK, my boyfriend of a 2year just broke up with me and am 28 weeks pregnant. I have cried my self to sleep most of the nights and don’t seem to concentrate during lectures sometimes I stay awake almost all night thinking about him and start to cry all over again. Because of this I end up not having energy for my next day’s classes, my attendance has dropped and am always in uni and on time. Generally he is a very nice guy, he ended it because he said we were arguing a lot and not getting along. He is right we’ve been arguing during the pregnancy a lot. After the break up I kept ringing him and telling him I will change. I am in love with this guy and he is the best guy I have ever been with. I’m still hurt and in disbelief when he said he didn’t have any romantic feelings towards me anymore that hurt me faster than a lethal syringe. He texts me now and then mainly to check up on how am doing with the pregnancy, he is supportive with it but it’s not fair on me, him texting me as I just want to grieve the pain and not have any stress due to the pregnancy. i was really upset and i needed help, so i searched for help online and I came across a website that suggested that Dr Ahmed can help solve marital problems, restore broken relationships and so on. So I felt I should give him a try. I contacted him and he told me what to do and i did it then he did a spell for me. 22 hours later, my boyfriend came to me and apologized for the wrongs he did and promise never to do it again. Ever since then, everything has returned back to normal. I and my boyfriend are living together happily again.. All thanks to Dr Ahmed. as it is a place to resolve marriage/relationship issues, do you want to be sure if your spouse is being faithful to you or Do you want your Ex to come back to you Contact.:
    E-mail: [email protected]
    save your crumbling home and change of grades its 100% safe.
    I suggest you contact him. He will not disappoint you.

It is main inner container footer text