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Did Cantor’s Loss Inspire Extra Crazy Time Today?

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Who is today’s worst person?

1. Oklahoma state House candidate Scott Esk, for being “OK” with stoning gay people to death.

2. Rep. Louie Gohmert for using a Congressional hearing to speculate about whether non-Christians go to Hell.

3. Pat Robertson for telling kids not to turn their father in to the police when he threatens their mother with a gun.

What the hell is wrong with this country?

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  • MAJeff

    It seems that what’s wrong with all of them is a brand of Southern Evangelical Christianity.

    The Teabaggers for Jeebus are the problem.

    • DrDick

      When whackaloon political and economic ideologies fuse with whackaloon religious beliefs, the result will never be pretty.

    • Socrets

      Don’t forget the “Both Sides do it” and “No difference between the two parties” crowd.

      • Dano

        the …“No difference between the two parties” crowd.

        I actually heard a local apologist yesterday claim with a straight face that Cantor was just like the Democrats.

        Best,

        D

  • NotOnScript

    Why only these three? The day is still young!

    (Wow, I wish that was more of a joke….)

    • Too true.

    • LoriK

      Sadly, definitely not a joke. Did you see this gem from my neck of the woods:

      Indiana GOP candidate: ‘No one has the guts’ to let poor people ‘wither and die’

      http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/06/11/indiana-gop-candidate-no-one-has-the-guts-to-let-poor-people-wither-and-die/

      • southend

        What, you don’t remember Jesus adding that at the end of the Sermon on the Mount? “Blessed are those who would let the poor wither and die, for they are truly assholes of the highest order?”

        • LoriK

          That’s a bad translation. The correct one is apparently “Blessed are those who would let the poor wither and die, for they are doing God’s work.”

        • Bill Murray

          It’s clearly the cheesemakers fault

          • Greg Folkert

            Do you, infact, have any cheese here at all?

  • Bill Smith

    Pat Robertson, both for the win and for the answer: the intersection of skeezy politics, exclusionary religion and way, way too much money.

    • John F

      I hate to be fair to Robertson, but what he actually said isn’t as bad as the headline says.

      • LoriK

        The “you don’t want to get your father busted” part is pretty much as awful as the headline makes it seem. That’s somewhat mitigated by the fact that he isn’t advocating that the kids simply live with it and that he points out that the mom, as the adult, really needs to be the one to handle it. Starting out from the position that the important thing is not to get dad in trouble with the law still sucks though, because that actually isn’t the most important thing by a long shot. No pun intended.

        • John F

          The “again, you don’t want to get your father busted, but you could” comes across to me as an observation (And likely an accurate one), not a directive to not go to the Police-

          Robertson then adds

          “This kind of rage — I mean, one day he’s going to pull the trigger,” the TV preacher warned. “It doesn’t take too much if you’ve got a loaded weapon and you’re brandishing it around, ‘I’m going to kill you.’ And the next thing you know, the thing goes off. It may be accidentally, but the mother will end up dead.”

          There seems to be parts missing, but it seems to me that part of the conversation was the caller saying he didn’t want to call the police, and Robertson was merely acknowledging that

          • LoriK

            Maybe so. It’s possible that Robertson’s past history of horrible advice and general batshittery is making me unfairly disinclined to see this in a reasonable light.

          • MH

            It looks like the kind of thing that would look different in print than in person – an implicit “I know that” at the beginning of the sentence really is something we often use tone of voice to indicate rather than just saying it outright. And from what I saw from the rest of what he said I suspect his intention was “but at least you should…”

      • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

        Um, yeah, it is.

        “Your mother ought to take care of that.”

        That’s blaming the victim. Do you have any idea how difficult it is to get out of a DV situation?

        • MH

          Full quote:

          “But you’re a kid, what do you do? You know?” he said. “Your mother ought to take care of that.”

  • Pat

    What a decision. I’ll go with Pat Robertson, because I’m sure he has different suggestions if the kids find out their parents are smoking weed. Telling people what to do is probably somewhat worse than just agreeing with a bad idea.

    • rea

      Robertson’s advice is not so bad, in context–he was saying that it ought to be the mother rather than the pre-teens who called the police, not that the police ought not to be called.

      Well, again, you don’t want to get your father busted, but you could,” Robertson explained. “You ought to go to your mother and say, ‘Mom, this thing is scaring me, and I ask you please to get my father to have some help.’”

      “This kind of rage — I mean, one day he’s going to pull the trigger,” the TV preacher warned. “It doesn’t take too much if you’ve got a loaded weapon and you’re brandishing it around, ‘I’m going to kill you.’ And the next thing you know, the thing goes off. It may be accidentally, but the mother will end up dead.”

      Robertson told the child that something had to be done about the father.

      “But you’re a kid, what do you do? You know?” he said. “Your mother ought to take care of that.”

      If he’d said this to the mother rather than the kids–“Don’t make your kids bear the burden of being the one that calls the police on their dad–you make the call”–I’d agree.

      • Murc

        It was pretty easy story to believe about Robertson, though. About conservatives in general, really.

        I was on a business trip a month back, surrounded by conservative types. I casually brought up an ongoing argument I have with my Dad (about whether or not he was lucky to go to college when he did and can’t judge current students by the same financial standards as applied then) and more than one of them actually stared at me slack-jawed, like I’d just suggested we end the evening by finding some kittens to rape.

        I was then told that contradicting my father openly like that was one of rudest possible things they’d ever heard, and that I owed him deference and respect in all things because he was my father and that was how things worked; he’s always right even when he’s not. One of them actually said “You can be right after he’s dead. Until then, he’s right. That’s how it works.”

        • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

          “You can be right after he’s dead. Until then, he’s right. That’s how it works.”

          Fuck. That. Noise. Fucking authoritarians.

      • I don’t know, just going by this quote, it doesn’t sound like he’s saying the mother should call the police, just that she should get the father “help.”

        Which is basically putting the burden of ending abuse on its victim twice over, first because it becomes the mother’s problem to treat her husband rather than simply get away (from someone who is threatening her with a loaded weapon, no less), and second because it becomes the mother’s responsibility, rather than the state’s, to address her child’s emotional trauma from the abuse (which, yes, parents are the first line when it comes to these issues, but maybe a person who is dealing with an abusive situation could get some help instead of having to shoulder it on her own?).

        • rea

          it doesn’t sound like he’s saying the mother should call the police, just that she should get the father “help.”

          Actually, it’s more like he’s telling the kid how to sell the idea of doing something to stop the abuse to his codependent mother. “You ought to go to your mother and say, ‘Mom, this thing is scaring me, and I ask you please to get my father to have some help.’”

          it becomes the mother’s responsibility, rather than the state’s, to address her child’s emotional trauma from the abuse

          Which is beside the point, because the state does not know about this until someone tells it. This is an abusive and dangerous situation for the children as well as the mother and she owes a duty to protect the children from that abuse. It shouldn’t be up to a child to deal with this, it’s potentially dangerous, both physically and emotionally, and what happens if his mother doesn’t back up his story?

          • Malaclypse

            What about asking the child to find an adult that s/he trusts, and asking for help?

        • Chocolate Covered Cotton

          Just want to point out here that calling the police because you’re afraid a dangerous domestic situation may get violent can be a good way to guarantee that it becomes violent especially if someone’s armed. Too often, cops arrive and escalate the situation rather than defuse it. You wanted the cops to break up the fight between mom and dad, dad ends up dead. How’s that for childhood psych trauma?

    • I hate to support robertson on this but i think he was trying to prevent the child from inserting himself into a dangerous situation and assuming a prematurely adult role. He wasnt saying that the mother, or an outsider, shouldnt involve the police and get the father ” busted”– he just doesnt think the child should be the one to do it.

      • Oops, that was me.

        • rea

          Go tell the Spartans, stranger passing by . . .

          • Ahuitzotl

            Here we blog, obedient to their order?

    • Just Dropping By

      ll go with Pat Robertson, because I’m sure he has different suggestions if the kids find out their parents are smoking weed.

      Nice try, but Pat Robertson has said that marijuana should be legalized and he supported the Colorado and Washington ballot measures on the subject: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/pat-robertson-marijuana-should-be-legal/

      • Manta

        Normal people have evil doppelgangers: does Pat Robertson have a good doppelganger that says reasonable stuff?

  • jim, some guy in iowa

    it occurs to me jesus must not want anything to do with pat robertson, seeing as the miserable creep still walks the earth

    • Linnaeus

      And then I will profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you that work iniquity.

    • drkrick

      Robin William’s line about Oral Roberts seems to apply to Robertson: after what Jesus went through on Earth, it doesn’t seem fair that he has to spend Saturday nights talking to Robertson.

  • Alex O’connor

    Born again confederates. Someone please resurrect Sherman.

  • Malaclypse

    While they all suck, Robertson gave that advice to a real, scared child, who has a real mother in actual physical danger. The other two are rhetoric – fucking awful rhetoric, but rhetoric. Robertson failed to help actual individuals, one of whom was a child.

    • togolosh

      I think the stoning dude is a strong contender, but Robertson wins based on your reasoning.

      • Barry Freed

        Seconding this. I was inclined to go with the stoning dude but Mal’s got it right.

        • grouchomarxist

          Mal nails it.

          Although I probably would have gone with Robertson just for the many years he’s spent bilking shut-ins and the mentally challenged. Compared to him, Gohmert and Esk are rank amateurs. And maybe because ol’ Smilin’ Pat is a major part of the reason why goobers like those two infest our politics.

    • Gwen

      Yes, instead of giving someone practical advice to deal with the tragic reality of domestic violence, Pat Robertson (who is a minister), basically responded with “snitches get stitches.”

      Louie Gohmert is a known moron, and Scott Esk may be unelectable even in Oklahoma. Robertson is supposed to be a Very Serious Person, or about as close to a VSP as you can get in the fundagelical clown show.

      • Random

        Robertson is supposed to be a Very Serious Person,

        I have no idea what kind of people you’ve been hanging around.

    • BigHank53

      And, as a self-professed pastor and moral leader, he bears more responsibility. Louie Gohmert is an ass, as is Esk, but there’s not even the tiniest expectation that holders of public office or the candidates for them be moral exemplars.

      • MAJeff

        Are clergy actually moral leaders?

        • See the original post. Robertson helped lead the way.

        • JMP

          They claim to be, even though they’re just involved with religion, which not only has nothing to do with morality but often actively impedes it.

          • M. L. King, jr

            Huh.

            • JMP

              Oh no, you really got me with that gotcha there! OK, because some great moral leaders were also religious, that means that somehow morality requires religion. Atheists like myself are just degenerate monsters, and actually spend our spare time torturing kittens, and religious people are inherently good and better than us, even those who want gay people to be stoned to death!

              • Snarki, child of Loki

                Don’t forget all the atheists that molest altar-boys. That’s just unforgivable, really.

            • Col Bat Guano

              exceptions…rule.

            • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

              Someone missed the word “often” in JMP’s original comment. Purposefully, I suspect.

      • mark

        I think people are not giving Gohmert enough credit in admittedly tough race. He is the only one of the three who is an actual federal office holder.

  • pseudonymous in nc

    It’s a Maureen Dowd situation: three doses of entirely expected crazy, just stacked too closely together.

    • Gwen

      I wouldn’t mind it if my state rep called for the gays to get stoned, so long as he meant it the way they mean it in Denver.

  • Brandon

    I don’t want to live on this planet anymore.

    • DrDick

      We just need to repel the invasion of the pod people which has taken over the GOP.

      • Greg Folkert

        To late… they are onto the Democrats now.

    • ChrisTS

      I believe there are, yet, any number of places one might live un-surrounded by monsters and lunatics. I am researching them.

      • Pseudonym

        Ironically, the best option for getting away from lunatics might be the moon.

  • Downpuppy

    Louie was just asserting his authority as Emperor of the Crazy. You gotta respect that.

    • Personally, I think Gohmert woke up to the realization that he moved up in the GOP foodchain and couldn’t control himself.

      • Hogan

        “Then I am king of the cats!”

        • Barry Freed

          That story still gives me chills after all these years.

          • Woodrowfan

            what story? sounds good..

      • herr doktor bimler

        “One step closer to being head of the centipede!”

    • Karate Bearfighter

      If anyone needs me, I’ll be in the Angry Dome.

      • john not mccain

        We’re going to need a bigger dome.

  • After some deliberation I’m going with Esk for pure hateful dumbfuckery. The Robertson thing sounds as authentic as a faith healing session.

  • LeeEsq

    A lot.

  • kindness

    I blame Rupert Murdoch. Prior to Fox News (and the buying up of the WSJ) conservatives bloviated but the didn’t often wish pestilence, famine & death upon their opponents openly. Now at Fox that is the opening dialogue to any issue.

    • That’s not how I remember things.

      • Fox helped mainstream it. They started teaching that people who were psychotics were people worth respecting. They didn’t invent crazy people, but they gave them a prime time platform.

        • Ronald Reagan, a fucking lunatic, had lunatics working for him, and they all made prime time.

          • Keaaukane

            That was part of the whole De-institutionzation thing.

            • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

              Can we please not equate people with psychiatric illnesses to evil shitbags?

          • GeoX

            Did Reagan actually openly advocate for the murder of his political opponents, though?

        • KmCO

          Exactly. All Murdoch has done is give the lunatics a platform that reaches a broader audience.

        • pseudonymous in nc

          Maybe, but we’re also more broadly aware of wingnuttery in the wild.

          I can well believe that state legislature candidates in Beaumfork County, KS were telling people at public meetings that gays should be buried alive, but it wouldn’t get reported outside of the Beaumfork Tractor-News, circulation 500 and published every Friday.

        • Malaclypse

          Fox helped mainstream it.

          Bullshit. We’ve always had this.

          This country was founded on slavery, and we’ve never really come to grips with this. We’ve always had some percentage of people – and 27% seems a reasonable percentage – that are would-be aristocrats and their bootlickers. They are a bit more successful now – Erik is right with the New Gilded Age stuff – but they’ve always been with us.

          • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

            Yep.

            This same crap was being said long before the internet. But, until very recent times, it was nearly universally normative. Oh, sure, some people had the “class” not to express the sentiments so crudely. They were “polite” in their bigotry, because throwing around the N-word was Just Not Done. They were still bigots, though.

            I’ll also echo Pseudonymous’s observation that the internet and the 24-hour news cycle make every bigot eruption into a news event. Years ago, they were just pieces of aural or textual wallpaper.

    • Sly

      There were always wingnuts, they were just the lone guy in a town who, depending on the era, donned a billboard and shouted about Freemasons or Jews or Commies while selling pencils from a cup.

      Then the John Birch Society came along and told those lone guys that there were others like him, in other towns, and that maybe they should have a major meetup where they could all shout about the Freemasons or Jews or Commies together. Then conservative mass media handed a megaphone to the chieftains of the tribe.

      • DrDick

        Worth noting that Daddy Koch was a founder of the Birchers.

        • ChrisTS

          Yup.

      • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

        There were always wingnuts, they were just the lone guy in a town who, depending on the era, donned a billboard and shouted about Freemasons or Jews or Commies while selling pencils from a cup.

        And then there were all the “respectable” bigots who would never be so déclassé as to do such a thing, but who weren’t any less hostile to Jews or Commies or people of color. They have always been a much bigger obstacle to progress than the lone nuts.

        (Not sure about Freemasons. They were probably more hostile to Catholics than to Freemasons.)

        • MAJeff

          See also, the White Citizen’s Councils.

  • David W.

    What’s wrong with this country? Compared to Iraq, not much.

    • If you think this case of anti-biotic resistant bacterial pneumonia is bad, wait until you try the rabies!

      • David W.

        I was thinking more along the lines of Teahadists seizing Pahrump, NV.

        • They already have it. An economy based on brothels, guns, and Art Bell.

        • witless chum

          An armed extremist group holding part of Nevada to defy the federal government? Preposterous!

          • Lee Rudolph

            Throw in all of Utah and a couple of states from the Old South TBA, and it’s a deal!!!

    • R. Porrofatto

      I dunno. Since it was the unprovoked U.S. invasion which has plunged Iraq into its current state of violent and totally predictable chaos, I’d say lots.

      • David W.

        I agree about the consequences of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. It resulted in a revolution that put the Shias in charge, and now we’re seeing a Sunni counter-revolution.

      • Sly

        Conservatives invaded America long before they invaded Iraq.

      • Woodrowfan

        “Unprovoked”?!! But they had OUR oil held hostage under their land!

  • Davis

    Oh, Esk can’t be that bad. He did say that he did not want to “reinstitute” stoning in Oklahoma. He seems to be OK that they got rid of it.

    • I love how he squares it with his libertarianism by just saying that we need to respect the necessity of death penalties for some crimes. I expect he sang a chorus of “tradition” as the capstone to his argument.

      • Snarki, child of Loki

        It’s not as if OK has a stellar record on “competent executions”, so perhaps it would be best if Esk should try out the stoning on Lindsay Graham first, and we’ll see how it goes.

        “Hey Sen. Graham! Mince on over here, Rep Esk wants to have a little discussion about GEOLOGY with you!”

      • So-in-so

        But what of the tradition of feeding Christians to Lions?

        I know, we have moved from abusing captive wild life…

    • Autonomous Coward

      So my knowledge of the Sooner State (presumably this is short for “Sooner or later you’ll wish your relatives had decamped for California in the 1930’s”) is limited, as is my American Judicial History, but when precisely was stoning “an institute” and when was it “de-instituted” in OK?

      On a personal note, I would like to express sorrow that one of my all-time favorite jokes was obviated by Lawrence v. Texas:

      What’s the definition of a good criminal attorney? One who can get a charge of sodomy reduced to “following too closely”.

      • The Sooner nickname came from the fact that when the Feds opened the territory for settlement, they basically lined settlers up along the border and at 9AM (or whatever the time was) blew a whistle and said “Have at it”. People were then free to post claims on whatever land they could.

        “Sooners” refers to the facts that a bunch of people jumped the gun, cheated, and rode in early

        • drkrick

          And that they appear to be proud of them.

          • LittlePig

            Hell, the Tennesseans are proud they volunteer to go to the Alamo. That’s a two-fer.

            • witless chum

              West Virginia is, in theory, proud they launched an armed rebellion against the government of Virginia.

        • Scott P.

          So the state mascot is an illegal immigrant.

          • Y’know, I never thought of it that way…

        • Brandon

          Freeloading moochers and illegal lawbreakers is what they are!

          • DrDick

            The original Libertarians.

      • I went to a (polytechnic) institute (rather than a university) and students being stoned was not unheard of.

    • cpinva

      when was stoning ever a method of capital punishment in either the English colonies, or the US?

      • It seems to have been unique to the Semitic people of the Middle East, altho England had its own brutal methods of torturing and killing criminals.

        You really don’t want to know.

      • Hogan

        Oh please. We’ve all read Shirley Jackson.

        (It wasn’t an “institution” so much as a family outing.)

        • Aimai

          We did “press” witches to death, including men IIRC, here in New England.

          • Sly

            Technically, pressing (“peine forte et dure”) was never used against witches. It was an old method of convincing people accused of various crimes to plead guilty or not guilty during the arraignment. If no plea was entered, the person couldn’t actually be tried.

            Giles Corey was the only one pressed to death during the Salem Trials for refusing to enter a plea (the practice was pretty rare in the English-speaking world). He likely knew that the court would find him guilty but, by dying during the pressing, his estate could not be confiscated by the court and would remain in his family. His last words, reportedly, were “more weight.”

            • “It were a fearsome man, Giles Corey.”

      • At least one of the Salem ‘witches’, Giles Cary/Corey, was pressed to death, stones dropped on a board over him until he suffocated.

      • Bill Murray

        I believe the English only stoned the crows and pickled the lizards

  • What the hell is wrong with this country?

    Simple.

    People conflate rights with privilege.

    You have the right to own a gun. When you abuse that right, it becomes a privilege, no matter how much you choose to spin it in your own head.

    You have the right to say whatever is on your mind. When you abuse that right, it becomes a privilege, no matter how much you choose to spin it in your own head.

    And so on.

  • RogerAiles

    There’s pikes enough for all three.

    To be fair, Gohmert was just musing about what Eric Cantor might do after his term ends.

    • Lee Rudolph

      There’s pikes enough for all three.

      Waste not, want not. En brochette is the way to go!

  • NewishLawyer

    Serious answer.

    We might be seeing a resurgence of right-wing populism because of a decline of jobs for the working and lower middle classes and the rise of the new gilded age as has been noted on LGM.

    Right-wing populism works better for the given movement because anti-immigration combines a fear of the other/foreigners with anger at outsourcing and globalization. The same dynamic is also happening in Europe. Wasn’t there also a study that showed that white people are more likely to be racist because of economic scarcity? Very much a FU, Give Me Mine mindset.

    There are liberal populists like Warren and Sherrod Brown but they seem unable to shake their images as elite professionals despite working-class routes. For whatever reason, the white working class had decided that the real enemy is an upper-middle class liberal from Cambridge, Brooklyn, or some similar area. Perhaps those people are seen as getting the main benefits of globalization via cheaper goods and services.

    • FlipYrWhig

      You already had the answer to your “perhaps” earlier in the post: for millions of people, the real enemy is darkies. That’s what it’s always been. For that crowd, liberal professionals say they want to help the darkies because of pity, but they’re a bunch of selfish meddlers who use Real Americans’ money to do what they think is right. That’s as thoughtful as it gets. When times are better economically, the loudness of the explanation recedes, because there’s less reason to find someone to blame. But it’s always right there an angstrom below the surface.

    • Sly

      There are liberal populists like Warren and Sherrod Brown but they seem unable to shake their images as elite professionals despite working-class routes. For whatever reason, the white working class had decided that the real enemy is an upper-middle class liberal from Cambridge, Brooklyn, or some similar area. Perhaps those people are seen as getting the main benefits of globalization via cheaper goods and services.

      Distrust of urbanites predates modern globalization by at least a century, and is primary a product of early industrialization. Early industrial cities gave the rural poor a place to work, and they flooded into them with wild abandon. The concentration of people living in extreme poverty brought with it all the attendant social vices, so the rural folk who remained in the hinterland quickly associated the city itself with decay and degeneracy.

      The mid to late 19th century is littered with pulp novels and “penny dreadfuls” that brought sensationalized horrors of urban life to the masses. The most widely read American novel in the 1840s was a pulp novel called The Quaker City, which was about the trial of a man in Philadelphia who murdered a man who “seduced” and raped his sister, and beat the charge with an insanity defense before returning to his rural home town to a hero’s welcome.

      • KmCO

        That’s very interesting information. For some reason I have always been fascinated by the relationship between “the city” and non-urban residents (including suburban and exurbanites), and how this relationship is fraught and marked by distrust. The cultural charge of “elitism” gets thrown at everything The City stands for, and this has some definite racial and xenophobic/anti-Semitic undertones. But I also think that there is a fear/distrust/resentment/what have you of the perceived education and sophistication that the City represents to those who don’t live there. That cosmopolitan mindset seems to be seen as a gateway for all sorts of “forbidden” ideas and questioning of traditionalism and so-called common sense.

        • NewishLawyer

          Distrust of the urban goes back to Jefferson. Jefferson hated cities and Jeffersonian Democracy was all about yeoman living off the land and only taking what they need. Though Jefferson was also a big supporter of public education.

          The argument I get from rural types (and this goes back to William Jennings Bryant if not earlier) is that cities need the country more than countries need the city. “Who will grow your food?” is the common question asked.

          Suburbs are interesting because you have city identifying suburbs and ones that which to ID more with the country.

          The Cosmopolitan aspect is interesting of course because there is a strong implication if not explicit statement that cities are alien to the nation-state and second class.

          • Jeffersonian Democracy was all about yeoman living off the land and only taking what they need.

            what was never explicitly acknowledged is for that to work, you need slaves.

            • So-in-so

              Whatever happened to “Stadtluft macht frei”?

            • Lee Rudolph

              you need slaves

              That falls under “taking what you need”.

          • Origami Isopod, Commisar [sic] of Ideology for the Bolsheviks

            “Who will grow your food?” is the common question asked.

            It’s a valid point, I have to say.

            • Malaclypse

              As is the question “What factories will build your tractors?”

              • Chocolate Covered Cotton

                “Who will buy your crops?” is another valid question. Enjoy your subsistence farming, ingrates.

  • brad

    Going off topic, this needs a post of its own.

    Ayn Rand made Bergdahl desert.
    We can say that now, fun.

    • Snarki, child of Loki

      He really Went Galt?

      If only the Libertardlicans would do the same…

      • Lee Rudolph

        On June 9, two weeks before he walked away, Bergdahl sent an e-mail to a friend.

        “l1nes n0 t g00 d h3rE. tell u when 1 ha ve a si coure 1ine about pl/-\ns,” read the partially coded message[.]

        WaPo never disappoints!

    • ChrisTS

      Wait – the Coasties discharged him for psych issues and the Army took him?

      • Chocolate Covered Cotton

        Why does this surprise? The Coast Guard is far more selective about recruiting, they can afford to be. In the early ’90s I inquired about enlisting in the USCG at the age of 24 and was told they would pretty much only take 18 or 19 year old valedictorians with spotless records. So I joined the Navy, who would literally take anyone who could walk and speak English. And that was without a shooting war going on.

  • NewishLawyer

    Liberals also seem to still find populism to be very distasteful as a rhetorical device. Our superstars prefer to be wonks with powerpoints and all the charisma of Ben Stein’s character from Ferris Bueller.

    • Nobdy

      Obama and Bill Clinton may be somewhat wonky (especially compared to Republican candidate who champion ignorance) but I would not call them charisma free. In fact I would call both of them incredibly charismatic.

      I guess you could argue they’re not “liberal heroes” but I think instead of liberal what you mean THERE would be super wonky nerdy liberals, who of course will prefer their own.

      • Nobdy

        I would add that perhaps the ultimate liberal hero is FDR, and that man had charisma. As did John Kennedy. As did Martin Luther King.

      • DrBrownshtain

        The meat of Newish’s point was populism, but ok, great.

        • Nobdy

          Are you arguing that Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and FDR, were not populists?

          FDR was the most populist president we’ve had. Bill Clinton’s most remembered line is “I feel your pain.” Obama promised hope and change to the dispossessed. They may not be radical populists, and their policies may not have been as good for the majority of the population as one would like, but to call them “not populist” is to redefine the term.

          • NewishLawyer

            FDR died a long time ago.

            Clinton and Obama are great speakers and great with rhetoric but that it is different than being a populist.

            The right-wing for better or for worse knows how to produce speakers who really get the blood boiling and get listeners hoping mad. This includes politicians and non-politicians.

            The left is good at producing very smart wonks who just don’t understand why people are unconvinced by white papers and prefer solutions that are too clever by half. Or we can produce mawkish Upworthy type stuff. We need to get back some of the FDR style populism. Can you imagine a Democratic politician today delivering something like the 1/3 a nation speech? I think Elizabeth Warren might be the only one. How about the cross of gold speech? If any Democratic politician, our wonks would consider it distasteful, write as such, and then go back to writing policy papers and wondering why no one listened to them.

  • KmCO

    I’m going to go with Gohmert, who (god help our country) is an actual elected official abusing his position to satisfy his own urges for exclusionary hate-mongering.

    • ChrisTS

      THANK YOU!

    • Gabriel Ratchet

      Once again I defer to Charlie Pierce’s description of Gohmert as “the dumbest mammal to serve in any legislature since Caligula’s horse.”

  • KmCO

    Our country has largely been fucked-up since its founding, but the rapid societal changes of the past several decades have unleashed a frightening howl from those who flat-out refuse to acknowledge modernity.

    • Manta

      Some of the main aspects of “modernity” are free trade, deregulation, globalization, moving work to the cheapest and lest regulated countries, and gutting of unions: do you think the people who fight against those trends are wrong and/or evil?

      • Malaclypse

        Some of the other aspects are treating women like they were human, gay rights, overthrow of monarchy, civil rights, freedom of religion, and a social safety net. Now, which set of aspects do you think KmCO meant?

        • atheist

          Obviously, the problem is that for many Americans, the Modernity that’s about feminism, civil rights, & a social safety net isn’t distinguishable from the one that’s about deregulation, gutting unions, and shipping their jobs overseas. So they’re against all of it. That’s right wing populism.

          • witless chum

            Yeah, the conventional answer is that we need real left-wing economic populism to answer that, but the Democrats seem unwilling or unable to really embrace that idea, probably because the party has embraced a lot of economically conservative but socially liberal types.

          • Este

            It’s not so much “is not distinguishable” as “is a convenient scapegoat that some people are willing to blame even when a cursory look at the actual facts shows otherwise.”

      • Mantas modernity is colonialism and neo colonialism, isnt it?

  • Anna in PDX

    The worst people today are the Senate republicans who kept that student loan thing from being voted on. May they all burn in Hell, if only I believed in it.

  • efgoldman

    Asked whether he really believed homosexuality ought to be punishable by stoning, Esk told MooreDaily.com that he had “huge moral misgivings” about the behavior but had “no plans to reinstitute [stoning] in Oklahoma law.”

    How really fucking white of him!

    • ChrisTS

      I was wondering how to parse his reply. Does “the behavior” refer to gay/lesbian sex or to stoning? ‘Cause, it is not at all clear to me that he said he has misgivings about stoning people to death.

    • had “no plans to reinstitute [stoning] in Oklahoma law.”

      …yet.

  • Ken

    To answer the question in the title, rather than either of the ones in the post, no. This is the normal level of crazy for the Republicans, nothing extra.

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  • Ruckus

    What the hell is wrong with this country?

    Conservatives. Same as always.

    SATSQ

  • Kilks

    Option D) Rick Perry comparing being gay to being an alcoholic.

    http://www.sfgate.com/politics/article/In-S-F-Rick-Perry-compares-homosexuality-to-5546544.php

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