Tag: This Day in Labor History

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On February 22, 1860, 3,000 shoemakers in Lynn, Massachusetts went on strike, beginning the nation’s largest strike before the Civil War. Traditionally, shoemaking was a part time job for farmers and fishermen when the season allowed it. Men cut and shaped the leather while women and children sewed the main part of the shoe to […]
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On February 10, 1966, the Senate failed to gain cloture on an attempt to appeal Section 14(b) of the Taft-Hartley Act, a sign of the limited power of labor unions in American politics, even at the height of their membership and influence in the United States. The 1947 Taft-Hartley Act had many terrible provisions. It […]
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On January 11, 1968, around 1,000 workers in Saigon walked off the job, protesting the unfair treatment they faced from South Vietnamese government and demonstrating the lack of commitment to democratic unionism from that government, even as the AFL-CIO pushed them and the U.S. government to make it a priority. In the aftermath of the […]
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On December 15, 1921, the Kansas National Guard arrived to break up women’s marches in support of a strike of coal miners in southeastern Kansas. That intervention, done with the open support of United Mine Workers of America president John L. Lewis who hated the independent and socialist UMWA local in that state, demonstrated the […]
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