Tag: This Day in Labor History

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Above: Elsie Parrish On March 29, 1937, the Supreme Court decided the case of West Coast Hotel Company v. Parrish. This 5-4 decision upheld Washington’s minimum wage law for women as constitutional, arguing that it was not a violation of free contract doctrine because the state had an interest in protecting women’s health and ensuring […]
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On March 11, 1811, the Luddite movement began in Arnold, Nottingham, England, when textile workers destroyed the machines where they worked as a protest against the oppression they felt as workers. This highly misunderstood early movement of workers is primarily used today by technological futurists to justify their own positions and attack those who aren’t […]
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On March 2, 1937, U.S. Steel signed a contract with the Steel Workers Organizing Committee. This victory for SWOC was not only a critical early win for what would soon become the Congress of Industrial Organizations, but also ended an era of U.S. Steel being a leader in opposing any labor organizing. It would certainly […]
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On January 16, 1865, General William Tecumseh Sherman issued Special Field Order No. 15, granting coastal plantation properties from Savannah, Georgia to the St. John’s River in Florida to ex-slaves. Extending thirty miles from the coast, this had the potential to reshape southern labor relations as much as the end of slavery. However, northern belief […]
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