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Tag: "music"

Labor Day VII

[ 2 ] September 2, 2013 |

Talib Kweli on what working people have to do to get by.

Labor Day VI

[ 1 ] September 2, 2013 |

Richard Thompson on love and strikes.

Labor Day V

[ 0 ] September 2, 2013 |

Run-DMC reminds us of the hard economic times of African-Americans during the Reagan years.

Labor Day IV

[ 1 ] September 2, 2013 |

The legendary cowboy singer Glenn Ohrlin with a comedic song about the very unpleasant work of castrating farm animals.

Labor Day III

[ 2 ] September 2, 2013 |

Blind Willie McTell on the perils of agricultural work and nature in the American South.

Labor Day I

[ 54 ] September 2, 2013 |

This fine Labor Day, I want to run a series of posts remembering the great history of work and the lack thereof in American music. For the first post, here’s some Dave Alvin. A former member of The Blasters and X, Alvin has a long history of writing about unions and work in song during his long solo career. Here’s an early example, “Brother on the Line.”

Also from his first solo album is “Jubilee Train,” a good example of remembering how great the New Deal was for the American working-class.

During the Bush years, he wrote “Out of Control,” which he would dedicate live to the Dick Cheney economy:

Finally, on his latest album, Alvin wrote one of the best songs about working people in the last several years, “Gary, Indiana 1959″ about the 1959 steel strike:

It’s also worth remembering that today is anniversary of the Rock Springs Massacre, so this is a good time to remember that the history of American work is very much also the history of immigration and racial oppression.

Lomax Recordings

[ 12 ] August 22, 2013 |

This is super cool. Old news, but I didn’t know about it and I assume most of you didn’t either.

Folklorist Alan Lomax spent his career documenting folk music traditions from around the world. Now thousands of the songs and interviews he recorded are , many for the first time. It’s part of what Lomax envisioned for the collection — long before the age of the Internet.

Lomax recorded a staggering amount of folk music. He worked from the 1930s to the ’90s, and traveled from the Deep South to the mountains of West Virginia, all the way to Europe, the Caribbean and Asia. When it came time to bring all of those hours of sound into the digital era, the people in charge of the Lomax archive weren’t quite sure how to tackle the problem.

“We err on the side of doing the maximum amount possible,” says Don Fleming, executive director of the Association for Cultural Equity, the nonprofit organization Lomax founded in New York in the ’80s. Fleming and a small staff made up mostly of volunteers have digitized and posted some 17,000 sound recordings.

“For the first time, everything that we’ve digitized of Alan’s field recording trips are online, on our website,” says Fleming. “It’s every take, all the way through. False takes, interviews, music.”

Lomax’s recordings were so great. He had such a great ear to what was wonderful in the enormous varieties of mid-20th century folk music, the forms of which are sadly almost all gone today. I have a couple of albums from the Southern Journeys series on Smithsonian and think they are great. Here’s a couple examples:

Gene Autry, “The Death of Old Mother Jones”

[ 9 ] August 17, 2013 |

One doesn’t exactly think of future Reaganite and California Angels owner Gene Autry as a crazy radical, but he did record “The Death of Old Mother Jones” in 1931.

Cowboy Jack Clement, RIP

[ 7 ] August 8, 2013 |

One of the unsung legends of country music. More known as a producer than performer or songwriter, but he was everywhere in country music for 50 years. “Let’s All Help the Cowboys Sing the Blues” is probably best known because of Waylon Jennings doing it on his seminal album Dreamin’ My Dreams, but it’s a Clement song.

He also produced most of Townes Van Zandt’s early records. Some thought he overproduced them but I have no problem with adorning someone with a rough voice like Townes with a higher level of production, even including the string section on “Kathleen.”

George Duke, RIP

[ 20 ] August 7, 2013 |

I was not a fan of George Duke’s solo work, but his work as a member of Frank Zappa’s band in the 70s was outstanding and well worth remembering upon his death.

Who Needs the Peace Corps

[ 30 ] August 3, 2013 |

Since the hippie post has so many people up in arms (and I’d like to mention that myself and an occasional LGM commenter and unionist who shall remain anonymous managed to have a lovely Eugene evening while avoiding all hippies, a real accomplishment), here’s a little followup in my head.

I want to get the crabs and sleep on Owsley’s floor.

J.J. Cale, RIP

[ 8 ] July 28, 2013 |

J.J. Cale has died. Can’t say I’m a huge fan of a style this laid-back, which can become outright sleepy. But Cale could write some excellent songs.

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