Tag: criminal justice

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"For the Money" is, in Fact, a Motive

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On October 3, 2009
I understand that you have to put the best face on things, but still… According to documents filed in Stamford Superior Court in 2007, he made an annual salary of $214,000, but that salary, along with assets and debts, came up in a dispute over the amount of alimony he was paying to his ex-wife, […]

One starves, get another

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On January 8, 2009

I’m not sure what’s more troublesome here: the fact that Alabama allows county sheriffs to profit from serving meals in their jails, or that it allocates a mere $1.75 per diem to feed them

Reasonable Doubts

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In Uncategorized
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On July 21, 2008
James Q. Whitman has an interesting new book about the development of the concept of reasonable doubt in the Anglo-American legal system. An odd feature of that system is its quite explicit refusal to produce anything like a formal definition of this supposedly crucial concept. How much doubt equals reasonable doubt? Most jurisdictions in the […]

On Giles

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On June 25, 2008

In the hubbub over Kennedy & Exxon today, little attention has been paid to Giles v. California, a case on which I worked (for the record, my SCOTUS record is now 1-0). In an opinion by Justice S

Injustice and Felony Murder

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In Uncategorized
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On December 4, 2007
Via Plumer, Adam Liptak discusses the case of a 20-year-old in Florida serving life without parole for lending some friends his car. What’s particularly useful in the article is that Liptak makes clear how unusual it is for the U.S. to have retained the concept of felony murder that holds accomplices equally responsible for murders […]

As I was Saying….

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On November 29, 2007

A program in Brooklyn that provides substance abuse counseling, job training, and other supports to people re-entering society after incarceration seems to be working and reducing recidivism rates. No

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