Author: Erik Loomis

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This is the grave of Charles Evans Hughes. Born in 1862 in Glens Falls, New York, Hughes enrolled at what is today Colgate University at the age of 14, transferred to Brown, and graduated at the age of 19. He entered Columbia Law School in 1882 and finished in 1884. He joined a prestigious law […]
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On October 15, 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Clayton Act. This law, providing protection for unions from injunctions destroying their strikes, was lauded by many labor leaders as the beginning of a new era for unions. But the willingness of courts to destroy unions remained stronger than labor law and ultimately, the Clayton Act […]

Music Notes

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On October 14, 2017

Obviously the major event in music since I last wrote one of these posts was the death of Tom Petty. There is much to say, but I will simply link to this Patterson Hood remembrance, which is really ou

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The New Prison Labor Force

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In General
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On October 14, 2017
Just last week, I profiled the 1978 Ellis Prison strike against their exploitation by the state that forced them to pick cotton on state-owned prison farms for no wages. They won that fight but the exploitation of prisoners for economic gain continues. That includes Immigration and Customs Enforcement, our fascist ethnic cleansing branch of the […]
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This is the grave of George McNeill. The so-called “Father of the Eight-Hour Day,” McNeill was born in 1836 in Amesbury, Massachusetts. Like many young New Englanders of his day, he started working in the apparel factories at a very young age, in his case he was 10 when he started working in 1846. He […]
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