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Yeah Jeets!

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You remember those threads about the ACA in which many armchair experts assured us that we totally could have had single payer had only Obama issued ultimatums to senators he had no actual leverage over? Well, someone who thinks this is brilliant negotiating strategery is now the CEO of the Florida Marlins:

No matter what Derek Jeter says, how he tries to spin his Miami Marlins’ pennies-on-the-dollar trade of Giancarlo Stanton to the New York Yankees, the truth is nakedly evident in his franchise’s actions. From the moment he and his partners plopped down $1.2 billion to buy the Marlins, their deeds have screamed bush league. This is what it looks like when amateurs try to play-act as professionals.

On Monday, as the Stanton trade became official and the Marlins set the GPS for their immediate future into the pipes of a toilet, Jeter said on a conference call: “There isn’t anything I would have done differently.”

Really? Nothing? He wouldn’t have given Stanton the courtesy of a phone call in his first two months as owner – something that no player is owed but one with a $295 million commitment is given because it’s prudent as a person and a business owner? He wouldn’t have reconsidered the team’s threat to Stanton that if he didn’t accept a trade to the St. Louis Cardinals or San Francisco Giants, he’d be a Marlin for life – or at least until he could opt-out after the 2020 season – which was the equivalent of a 7-2 off-suit bluff against pocket aces? He wouldn’t have tried to get more for the 59-home run-hitting reigning National League MVP than Starlin Castro and two prospects, one a soon-to-be 22-year-old who hasn’t pitched above short-season Class A ball and another who’s an 18-year-old rookie-ball lottery ticket?

Admittedly, he has now changed course, openly claiming he’s willing to trade Ozuna for the pre-margarined stale Kaiser roll he received in exchange for the best player in the National League.

Jeter and Bruce Sherman are despicable people acting in grotesque bad faith while lining their pockets with cash sent by teams who are actually tying to compete. Jeffrey Loria, who extorted Miami taxpayers for a new stadium that will also help to line the pockets of owners who have no intention of competing, is of course a despicable person. The Miami public officials who submitted to Loria’s blackmail are despicable people. And Rob Manfred, who in the kindest construction allowed a grossly undercapitialized ownership group to purchase the Marlins and strip it down to the studs without even trying to replenish the farm system, is a despicable person.

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