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Populist Launches Bold Challenge to Neoliberal Consensus

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This seems credible:

Roy Moore, the Republican nominee who lost Alabama’s closely watched Senate race this month, has filed a last-minute legal complaint alleging “election fraud” and asking the state not to confirm the victory of Democrat Doug Jones.

In the complaint filed in state court, Moore’s campaign argues that Alabama “will suffer irreparable harm if the election results are certified without preserving and investigating all the evidence of potential fraud.” It cites rumors of election fraud that have already been investigated and refuted by the Alabama secretary of state, argues that high Democratic turnout in key areas was statistically unlikely, and reports that Moore himself has taken a polygraph test — an attempt to disprove allegations that he made unwanted sexual advances on teenagers when he was in his 30s.

[…]

The Moore campaign’s main argument is that high Democratic turnout and low support for Moore in the state’s most populous, urban counties resulted in an “implausible, unexplained 35 percent drop in votes for Roy Moore relative to the vote share of Republican Party straight-line votes.” While Moore dramatically underperformed other Republican candidates in Alabama when he last ran for office, in 2012, the campaign cites four “experts” to argue that the state should “order a new special election to be held based upon the already known fraud which [Secretary of State John Merrill] had acknowledged and taken action against and the further fraud alleged in this complaint.”

The experts came to the case with baggage of their own. James Condit Jr., one of the election analysts who signed an affidavit on behalf of Moore’s campaign, has written and spoken about “Zionist” control of world politics, and alleged an Israeli role in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Richard Charnin, who provided the court with an argument that there was just enough possible fraud to swing the election, claimed to have “mathematically” proven a conspiracy behind the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

It’s not easy for a Republican to make a legal claim with major potential political benefits to Republicans so farcical he can’t find any powerful Republican to go along, but Moore has pulled it off!

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