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What’s worse than a drink called the Pill Cosby?

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Some background – A local restaurant/bar/clothing store briefly had a drink called the Pill Cosby. One of the business’ owners claimed that it was meant in part to raise awareness. And boy did it ever! Possibly not in the way they wanted. However, trolling on the subject of rape in exchange for a great deal of attention could well have been the goal. At any rate, the owners took it off the menu and apologized.

The whole thing was obnoxious and it was hard to imagine who or what could make it worse.

The answer of course is Nick Gillespie at Reason, with a sock full of False Equivalencies.

Making things worse : libertarians :: bouncing : Tiggers.

In questionable taste? Certainly. But is offering the drink actually participating in “rape culture,” as various Twitter folks aver, or is it something else altogether, as the operators of the business suggest? Or maybe it’s neither—maybe it’s just tasteless joke that is neither particularly offensive nor edifying. Does everything need to have a higher value in order to justify its existence? I hope not.

Because he’d be fucked if higher value were the standard for existence.

Libertarian follow-up question:

JFC.

Is this an example of disciplining via market forces and/or voice (as opposed to exit or loyalty, in the parlance of Albert O. Hirschman)? Or is it simply the latest sign of political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable?

OK, already that’s two questions. But it was a lot to load into one rhetorical designed to help people who think Gillespie is clever figure out that potential consumers objecting to a menu item that makes light of rape can’t be a legitimate use of the Free Market because Reason.

He could have stopped there. But he hadn’t yet displayed the gibbertarian’s full range of idiocy with a final False Equivalency x Gotcha hybrid.

And will the next casualty be “the Marvin Gaye,” a drink whose name is at the bottom of the menu in the picture of the drink above and to the right? Gaye came to an ugly and sad end, shot to death by his own father even as his career was reviving in the mid-1980s.

Because there’s no difference between a punny drink that makes reference to a man accused of doing bad things to other people – complete with pill capsule garnish in case a Reason fan needs help getting the joke – and a drink that bears the name a man who had a bad thing done to him. Touché, M. Gillespie!

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  • Denverite

    Wait, drinks are $14-$16? Does a plate of enchiladas come with them?

    (Speaking of wearing an onion on your belt…)

    • NewishLawyer

      That’s cocktail prices at most restaurants in NYC and SF. Maybe LA too.

      • Denverite

        In Denver, a high end margarita is maybe $8-9. At the uber-hipster bar with the super fancy cocktails that take 10 minutes to make and usually involve fire, they’re $10-$12.

        At the (nice-ish) places I go, a house margarita is $4-$5 and a good, boozy, super-premium IPA is $6-$7. The Front Range is the Napa of beer though.

        • NewishLawyer

          I think one advantage and disadvantage from being from New York and living in SF is that I am immune to sticker shock and always surprised about prices in the rest of the country for being so low.

          • Denverite

            And Denver isn’t a cheap city!

            The beer here is great though. There are maybe a dozen world class microbreweries within an hour or so drive.

            • Linnaeus

              Only a dozen?

              • djw

                Denver proper has 60. Not all world-class, though, I assume

                • Linnaeus

                  Oh, I know Denver has more than a dozen. As a Seattleite, I felt the need to jest a bit on the subject of craft breweries. :)

              • Hogan

                Why that’s barely enough to keep Denverite supplied.

        • The Temporary Name

          There are high-end margaritas?

      • cpinva

        “That’s cocktail prices at most restaurants in NYC and SF. Maybe LA too.”

        this is DC we’re talking about. in NYC/SF/LA, you are, in part, paying for the ambiance of those cities, the only “ambiance” in DC is provided by a bunch of old/white/male obnoxious politicians. this hardly warrants those kinds of prices for a drink. Chicago has more ambiance than DC, and the drink prices there don’t come close to this.

        • LeeEsq

          Power is the ultimate ambiance.

        • Lost Left Coaster

          Yes, but paying a high price for a drink is a pleasure in and of itself, for a certain type of person. Of which there are many in DC.

        • the only “ambiance” in DC is provided by a bunch of old/white/male obnoxious politicians.

          That’s only in the bad neighborhoods.

    • Johnnie

      A shot and a beer is $16. That tequila looks to retail for $30-$40 a bottle and I think we all know just how cheap Modelo is. There is no mixing involved, no interesting unexpected flavor combination, and yet, they charge $16. Remind me to never visit D.C.

      • JKTH

        Yeah that’s what caught my eye. How is that more expensive than the actual cocktails?

      • cpinva

        just to let you in on a deep, dark bar secret: all mixed drinks (unless specifically requested otherwise, and you will pay for that request) use “bar liquor” in them, not the good stuff. Hiram Walker’s Ten High is bar liquor bourbon, for example. it’s the bourbon that graces bourbon based mixed drinks, unless you ask for something better. the same thing goes for tequila/whiskey/vodka/gin/etc., the cheapest versions of these are usually what’s put in any mixed drink requiring them.

        bars figure the customer isn’t looking to actually taste the liquor in a mixed drink, so why waste a premium spirit on them? if they were, they’d have ordered the premium spirit (neat, or on the rocks) to begin with.

    • Steve LaBonne

      I’d pay that occasionally, if I really had to, for a really good Manhattan not made with bottom shelf vermouth way past its sell-by date. But certainly not for any of the slop on that menu.

    • Murc

      Where I come from those are strip club cocktail prices. Strip clubs that don’t have a cover and are recouping the cost on drinks, even.

      • Shantanu Saha

        How would you happen to know the prices at different types of strip clubs?

        • Murc

          Because I’ve been in my share of strip clubs over the years?

          Honestly, I’m not sure what other answer you thought you were gonna get. :)

          • Hogan

            “I’m a stripper. I thought everyone knew that.”

            • cpinva

              shit! who told you?

          • Ask Me Gently

            “According to a friend…”

    • rhino

      A decent cocktail in one of our ‘craft’ bars, here in Calgary Alberta, will run you between 16-20$ Canadian.

      Mind you, the spirits will be top shelf, the juices fresh squeezed, the bitters quite probably house made…

  • Cassiodorus

    Is it sad that I knew a vigorous Free Speech defense was coming from a mister before I made it to the third paragraph?

    • cpinva

      “Is it sad that I knew a vigorous Free Speech defense was coming from a mister before I made it to the third paragraph?”

      it would have been sadder still, had you not. odious drinks/odious people. sure, they have the right to be odious in public, but that doesn’t make them any less odious. of course, the whole “free speech/PC” thing is bogus to begin with, since it wasn’t the city or congress that told them to remove it from their ridiculously overpriced “fun” cocktail menu, it was the public telling them they were assholes for putting it on the first place, that caused them to remove it. yes, how “PC”, to be called an asshole when you are, in fact, being an asshole. tragique!

  • Snarki, child of Loki

    What could be worse? A “Donald Trump”.

    Corrupted ethics, bad vodka, bitters, a huge dose of entitlement, garnish with an entire crate of LIEms, and ignite in a dumpster before serving.

  • nkh

    This is forgetting that the most wonderful thing about Tiggers is that he’s the only one.

  • jim, some guy in iowa

    well, that’s all kinds of weird and not-nearly-as-clever-as-it-thinks-it-is. And I haven’t even gotten to the Reason thing

    • N__B

      I think that “Libertarian follow-up question:” has the possibility to be the new “Christ, what an asshole.”

      • Spot on, old bear.

      • ThresherK

        Where does the term JAQing Off (Just Asking Questions) fall in this?

        Like “Nice Guy”, it has a distinct new and capitalized definintion which is required to describe the people who fall into the category.

        • N__B

          In my opinion, JAQ-offs are the people who say things like “Libertarian follow-up question”.

      • tsam

        I have a question for Libertarians: Shut up.

        • N__B

          “‘Shut up’ he explained.”

      • efgoldman

        As soon as I saw Gillespie’s name, I knew without reading any further (although I did… aargh brain cells falling out my ears…) that whatever it said would be utter crap

  • N__B

    What’s worse that a drink called the Pill Cosby?

    A bar in New York had, for a while, a drink called a Bernie Goetz. It was a screwdriver with four shots.

    That may not be worse, but it’s in the running.

    • Karen24

      Good grief that’s terrible.

      • They are all awful–I really objected to the Pill Cosby and the Marvin Gaye, especially in what appears to be an all black people line up. Don’t use other people as marketing tools without their permission, for christ’s sake, and especially don’t fetishize african americans to sell your asshole cocktails.

        • Murc

          Don’t use other people as marketing tools without their permission, for christ’s sake,

          Surely this is context-dependent?

          I’m not sure I want to live in a world where the fine old jewish deli tradition of naming sandwiches after people is not a thing.

          • With permission gives a context.
            White guys using African Americans to market drinks gives another context.

            • Hogan

              At least one of the three owners is black.

              • I stand corrected. That makes it ok then, I guess?

                • Hogan

                  No, just a different flavor of awful.

                • rm

                  I was wondering of all the not-horrible-people named on the menu were associated with D.C., somehow, like Duke Ellington and Marion Barry are. Because if that were true, that would be one element of context mitigating the awfulness.

                  EDIT: I see that that is the case, downthread.

                  Anyway, I’ve never been so glad I don’t drink, live in nowheresville, and have no money.

            • Dilan Esper

              Given Hogan’s comment, I think you demonstrated nicely how “cultural appropriation” arguments are overused.

              • Origami Isopod

                … this has nothing to do with “cultural appropriation.” You’re not even wrong.

        • Judas Peckerwood

          Don’t use other people as marketing tools without their permission, for christ’s sake…”

          Getting said permission might be a bit difficult in the cases of Marvin Gaye, Duke Ellington and Marion Barry, unless you know a good psychic medium.

  • I particularly love how the entire menu is made up of drinks named for famous black people, and no one seemed to realize how insulting it is to group a serial rapist, however famous and successful in other walks of his life, in with people who for all I know were law-abiding (or at least not toxic at anywhere near the level of Cosby), simply because of their race and having worked in the entertainment industry.

    Because there’s no difference between a punny drink that makes reference to a man accused of doing bad things to other people – complete with pill capsule garnish in case a Reason fan needs help getting the joke – and a drink that bears the name a man who had a bad thing done to him.

    You see, this is actually the key. They can go on all they want about political correctness and witch hunts, but what it comes down to is that these people genuinely don’t understand what Cosby did wrong. In their minds, Cosby came to a bad end, and Gaye came to a bad end, and the fact that only one of those ends was self-inflicted (not to mention tied up in the victimization of dozens of other people) simply doesn’t register. I suspect that this is a lot less about libertarianism and more about rape culture – the complete inability to grasp that rape is a bad thing.

    • clay

      Why IS the menu only made up of black celebrities? That’s weird, right? Is it racist? I’m not sure if it’s racist…

      EDIT: And the Cosby one is the only name that’s a pun. You’d think the Marion Barry would have some fruit in it, at least.

      • medrawt

        I don’t know anything about this bar, but aside from Cosby, what the named people have in common is that they’re associated with DC, which is where the bar is. Henson and Gaye were born in DC at least (I had to look it up); Chapelle and Ellington were born and raised there (I didn’t have to look it up); Barry wasn’t born there (I had to look it up) but obviously is a famous local figure. I don’t know of a DC-Cosby connection, though it doesn’t mean there isn’t one?

        • clay

          Okay, the DC connection makes sense (minus Cosby). Still seems like they could be a little cleverer about it, though, instead of assigning a random name to a random drink.

          Like, have a Clarence Thomas, which is so sour it’ll cause you to keep your mouth closed.

          • Johnnie

            That is less gross than my joke about a Clarence Thomas themed cocktail.

            • clay

              Something involving a can of Coke, I assume.

          • Origami Isopod

            What would the Sheriff Dave Clarke consist of?

            • It would be stolen from the neighboring table….

            • jim, some guy in iowa

              the “Sheriff Dave” is a glass empty except for a crackerjack box medal in the bottom

        • Katya

          Yeah, there is a restaurant on U Street called Marvin that serves Southern and Belgian food.

      • science_goy

        A number of DC establishments celebrate the city’s unique African-American culture; they just usually don’t throw in a dash of crassness like this one.

      • Foxtrot Hotel

        A local brewery already makes a beer called Marionberry (with Marion blackberries). Possible that they didn’t want to (or come to close to) infringing on that.

        Cosby was in the Navy and stationed in Bethesda. He was a regular at Ben’s Chili Bowl to the point that he and the Obamas are the only ones who eat for free. There was also a mural on one wall with Cosby (among other famous African-Americans) that was only recently painted over: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2017/01/26/bens-chili-bowl-paints-over-its-mural-of-bill-cosby-and-obama/?utm_term=.ceb6675b182f

    • Right, they designed a menu of drinks named after famous African-Americans who have some connection to D.C. So far, so good.

      A drink called the Pill Cosby clashes with the rest and is obviously about the crime he’s been accused of, not his career.

      See also Karen24’s comment below.

      • But DC is a politics town–how do you not decide to name drinks after Obama, Michelle, and other famous african american political figures who, unlike Marion Barry, Cosby, and Marvin Gaye didn’t have tragic or troubling endings to their careers?

        • As I often say – there’s a lot more to D.C. than politics. Thank goodness.

          For example, the restaurant is in the U Street Corridor which was known for being a hub of African-American culture. The fact that the list is entertainer-heavy makes a lot of sense. I don’t think nature of Marvin Gaye’s death takes away from his career and find it hard to imagine any list of entertainers that wouldn’t include at least one tragically dead figure.

          In addition, Tarij Henson, Dave Chapelle and Duke Ellington are featured. So that leaves Barry who locally some people love and some people hate.

  • Karen24

    Bad Taste: having a drink called the Marion Barry on the same menu as one named after the divine Duke Ellington.

    Insulting and Crude: naming a drink after a rapist and garnishing it with pill capsules.

    There really is a difference between something being in bad taste — something that aesthetically unpleasant — and a calculated insult. The Pill Cosby is trying to make fun of the custom of drugging women and violating them once they’re unconscious from the drug. It’s making rape victims the butt of a bad joke. That is an insult.

    • science_goy

      Barry was for the most part a well-liked local figure, despite the contempt from the rest of white America.

      • BigHank53

        On the other hand, if the “Marion Barry” was in fact a re-labelled alcohol-free Shirley Temple that might actually be sort of funny. A bit of a dig, but at least it’s a dig at Barry’ addictions, not at everyone with a double-X chromosome.

  • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

    My son went through a Winnie the Pooh phase – super cute, but holy cow will those movies have you hating Tigger with a fury you never thought you possessed. Also surprising: how almost irredeemably horrible Rabbit is. Wow.

    • Yes, in The Pooh Perplex Rabbit’s real function as a capitalist roader is explored.

      • jim, some guy in iowa

        I like the “ordered by mistake. not very amusing” review. Someone thought “ooh, I *missed* this one” and felt sandbagged when they discovered it wasn’t another Milne story

    • N__B
    • clay

      The most recent Pooh movie from 2011 (probably the last hand-drawn movie Disney Animation will ever produce, sadly) was excellent. It didn’t overuse Tigger, and Rabbit was more a put-upon straight man rather than a bitter a-hole.

      Catchy songs, too.

      • Dr. Ronnie James, DO

        Looking forward to that one. It’s also notable for being a film aimed at small children that was only ~60 minutes long, maybe a bit of a ripoff but far more compatible with a small person’s attention span. I recently took the kids to see the Lego Batman movie, and at 90 minutes we all walked away feeling as overstimulated as I did after the director’s cut of Apocalypse Now.

    • Jeff R.

      This got us through the Winnie-the-Pooh stage: Pathology of the Hundred Acre Wood.

      The original two books are pretty good, though.

      • clay

        Oh yes, very clever books, with cracking good dialogue. Very easy to read aloud, too.

      • Origami Isopod

        OTOH, there’s The Tao of Pooh and The Te of Piglet, written by a male hippie who decided in the latter book (the former is simplistically dumb but inoffensive) to blame feminism for all the world’s ills.

      • easilyconfused

        Winnie ille Pu

        I was going to just leave that there, but I followed a search trail on the translator, Alexander Lenard, and Lynne Sach’s short film on him. What an amazing life he had.

  • medrawt

    What does Gillespie think distinguishes this:

    “political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable”

    from this:

    “disciplining via market forces and/or voice”

    in practical terms? Does he think the forces of the market only apply when he doesn’t have a stick up his ass about them?

    • corporatecake

      In Randian Fantasy Land, the Market also has libertarian politics and disapproves of political correctness.

    • That’s puzzling but its like he keeps the idealized market entirely separate from things that he imagines impinge on his consumption choices. So: when the market speaks and people stop buying something that is, in theory, a good thing but when it speaks and “stamps out” something he wants to see available on the market that’s a bad thing. The rest of us grasp that the availability of items we may want to consume, or want to know are available, whether orphan drugs or specific foods, are dependent on the creation and maintenance of a viable market in those items. If there isn’t a big enough, or wealthy enough, group demanding the supply of X, its not going to happen.

      Gillespies problem is that he sees insulting, rape supporting and racist speech as a kind of public good which he would like to see held outside of market forces. When “identity politics stamps out things he values” then the market that yields to identity politics is bad. But since the market can never be at fault he has to blame the consumer (humorless feminists, politically correct wraiths) rather than adjusting to the fact that assholes like him don’t always furnish a sufficiently large or noisy market capable of supporting an infinite number of “fuck you I’ve got mine” drinking establishments.

      • medrawt

        Inspired by my new insight, that left to its own devices the free market will always please ME, I’ve written a short but trenchant essay and plan to submit it to Reason:

        “The Forces of Political Correctness are Keeping Nut & Honey Off Of Supermarket Shelves and Jazz Musicians Off Of Major Record Labels”

      • No Longer Middle Aged Man

        Excellent analysis. I was having trouble puzzling it out – thanks for explaining.

      • NonyNony

        But since the market can never be at fault he has to blame the consumer …rather than adjusting to the fact that assholes like him don’t always furnish a sufficiently large or noisy market capable of supporting an infinite number of “fuck you I’ve got mine” drinking establishments.

        Excellent observation.

        It dovetails nicely with the observation that these guys think they’re in the majority, and are always shocked when presented with evidence that they are not. Rather than adjust their beliefs to consider that maybe their beliefs are the minority ones, they would prefer to believe that the noisy minority is shouting down the things that the majority really secretly wants but won’t cop to because of fears of “political correctness” ninjas stabbing them in their beds while they sleep.

        • LeeEsq

          Most Libertarians are aware they aren’t in the majority. They simply believe that their beliefs are so imminently right and will lead to greater prosperity that enforcing them against majority wishes is not bad. Sort of like Chavistas.

        • Origami Isopod

          It dovetails nicely with the observation that these guys think they’re in the majority, and are always shocked when presented with evidence that they are not.

          It’s more that they think their gender and race (and usually their incomes) make them Sooper Lodgikal and therefore inherently correct on anything they decide to opine about. When they get pushback, it must be due to brainwashing by SJWs, statists, and other takers-not-makers. The rest of us don’t have the ironclad intellectual constitution they have to resist such propaganda.

    • cleek

      only certified rational actors are permitted to have voices, in Libertarian La La Land.

      • Well they certainly believe that when it comes to votes, don’t they. Libertarians and republicans have both argued that since democratic voters are unreliable, illogical, and treasonous what with the feminism and the BLM stuff and the immigrants and refugees that they should not be allowed to vote. So voting is another place where the “free market” in ideas suddenly needs to be jettisoned when the wrong kind of consumers exercise consumer choice.

        • Origami Isopod

          Liberty magazine, back in the late ’90s I think, once ran an article asking whether women should be allowed to vote at all, since we tend to eschew libertarian beliefs.

          • Linnaeus

            “Why shouldn’t employers be allowed to sexually harass their employees? If the employees don’t like it, they can get another job! Free market!”

    • UncleEbeneezer

      The Free Market (TM) is meant for apolitical consumer decisions like boycotting the Dixie Chicks.

    • djw

      Right, they’re obviously the same thing, or at least overlapping considerably on the Venn diagram.

      For Gillespie, the exact same thing is neutral to good when described in economic language, and bad when described as political.

    • LeeEsq

      The practical difference seems to be in why a product is being discontinued. If the drink was withdrawn from the menu because people thought it tasted bad, that would be market forces at work because it’s a case of taste rather than politics. Getting the drink withdrawn because people took offense at its name is not market forces because the reasons are political.

    • Your preferences are driven by emotion and therefore invalid.
      My preferences are driven by emotion and therefore valid. Neener neener!

      • Origami Isopod

        No, no, my preferences are driven by Dudely Logic™!

    • Just_Dropping_By

      What does Gillespie think distinguishes this:

      “political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable”

      from this:

      “disciplining via market forces and/or voice”

      in practical terms?

      I don’t know what Gillespie thinks, but I can easily see the practical difference between complaints by actual customers or people who were reasonably likely to be customers (“disciplining via market forces”) and complaints by people who had never even heard of this bar before, were never likely to visit it, and are only complaining because of media coverage (“political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable”).

      • LeeEsq

        That’s actually a good distinction.

      • JKTH

        I can’t. If it were only the latter, why would the bar choose to pull the drink?

    • in practical terms? Does he think the forces of the market only apply when he doesn’t have a stick up his ass about them?

      Yes. Political Incorrectness is stuff that offends you but doesn’t offend me, political correctness is the opposite.

  • corporatecake

    Watching libertarians grapple with market forces doing things they don’t approve of is always good entertainment.

    • A politically correct and feministically enraged market wins, two falls out of three.

      • corporatecake

        Feminists have dollars and spend them. Who knew!

        Moreover, you don’t have to be an outraged feminist to feel kind of turned off and decide to go someplace else. D.C. has a lot of bars and restaurants.

  • cleek

    the bar (“Diet Starts Monday”) is not doing well on Yelp…

    https://www.yelp.com/biz/diet-starts-monday-washington

    • So, there is a god?

      • N__B

        Nah. Look elsewhere in that city for counter-evidence.

    • NonyNony

      Almost entirely due to people downvoting them because of their idiocy. No wonder they apologized.

      There is the one dude who gave it 5 stars for the “Pill Cosby” because “social just warriors ruin everyone” though. Idiots got to do what idiots got to do, I guess.

      • Origami Isopod

        That’s his only review. He created the account just to stick it to the SJWs.

  • LeeEsq

    Many people seem simply incapable of asking the question “is this a good idea” before they act. They simply get a notion in their head, it seems good, and they act on it.

    • BigHank53

      I remember reading an illuminating article about the writing/editorial process at The Onion, where 90-plus percent of the jokes wound up on the discard pile. And those were all the product of professional humorists!

      There’s a reason jokes get workshopped, modified, and discarded. Just because the stand-up person makes it look easy and natural doesn’t mean it is.

      • LeeEsq

        The inability to think before acting extends beyond making jokes.

      • NewishLawyer

        That was a This American Life segment. To be fair, I liked some discarded jokes. “Scientist discovers he was studying a Cadbury Egg” tickled me.

        • LeeEsq

          The Cadbury egg joke is pretty funny.

      • Origami Isopod

        And even The Onion fails sometimes. Hard, in fact.

    • NonyNony

      I hope that’s the process.

      In reality I worry that it might be – they get the notion in their head, they ask “is this a good idea”, they decide “yes, this idea is great!” and then they act on it.

      I’m very worried that a majority of people cannot tell right from wrong even if they sit and ponder it for a good long time, let alone whether something is a good idea or a bad one.

      • LeeEsq

        That seems depressingly more accurate. There was a law review article on the reasonably prudent person standard in negligence cases. The author wondered if people drawn to some jobs like law or insurance might be more reasonably people.

        I’ve noted in the past that some people are just wild. They want to live life intensely as possible and damn the consequences.

        • NewishLawyer

          My Torts Professor noted judges were probably uncommonly various/prudent people when we were discussing Negiligence.

          • LeeEsq

            I’d imagine that certain jobs like some types of law or insurance attract people with a tendency towards prudent. Many lawyers have dealt with clients whose lives would have been easier with a little common sense.

  • humanoid.panda

    “Is this an example of disciplining via market forces and/or voice (as opposed to exit or loyalty, in the parlance of Albert O. Hirschman)? Or is it simply the latest sign of political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable?”

    It’s like a Talmudic debate about the appropriate way to dispose of a soiled paper napkin with Hebrew lettering, but for exceedingly stupid people.

    • I love you for this.

    • Question:

      “Is this an example of disciplining via market forces and/or voice (as opposed to exit or loyalty, in the parlance of Albert O. Hirschman)? Or is it simply the latest sign of political correctness and identity politics stamping out anything that anyone can find objectionable?”

      Answer: No.

      • Linnaeus

        I think you mean, “SPOILER: No.”

    • LeeEsq

      Heh.

    • NewishLawyer

      LOL.

  • Hogan

    Does the Marvin Gaye have fake bullets floating in it? No? Then go pour yourself a big bowl of STFU.

  • tsam

    In questionable taste? Certainly.

    You coulda stopped right there and not been a total butthole. But noooooo–just couldn’t help but defend those poor, abused restaurant owners who think rape is funny.

    • NonyNony

      It’s not even in questionable taste. It’s obviously in bad taste – there’s no real question here.

      Even the guys who put it up on the menu probably knew it was in bad taste. That’s what made it “funny”.

      • veleda_k

        Yeah. I have some beachfront property in Arizona to sell to anyone who thinks this might have been about “raising awareness.”

    • Dilan Esper

      Without defending stupid business owners who do offensive things, it is worth saying that this sort of thing has a large component of manufactured outrage.

      People tell jokes about Cosby. All the time. Indeed, it was a stand up comedian who brought the attention to the case that has finally brought Cosby down. Indeed, I am willing to wager that a fairly significant percentage of the people bashing on this have either told or laughed at a joke about Cosby, or at least have heard one without finding it horribly offensive.

      I will stipulate that this is a reflection of rape culture, though a minor one. But it isn’t anything more than that. It certainly isn’t the reason for the sexual assault rate, any more than jokes about OJ Simpson are the reason for the spousal murder rate.

      • Esper looks into your blog comments and sees your soul. And it’s laughing at/not being horribly offended by jokes about rape. Or Cosby raping women.

        Anyway don’t bother lying about whatever it is, he just knows these things.

      • sibusisodan

        People tell jokes about Cosby. All the time

        The joke in this case is not targeted at Cosby. It’s about his actions and the people on whom he acted.

        It’s a simulacrum of receiving a drugged beverage – adding the fake pills on top just to ram it home! What it’s actually making light of is the experiences of his victims.

        Hence, obviously offensive.

        I can imagine a cocktail which did make Cosby the focus of the joke. That would certainly be edgy, possibly offensive. It is not this cocktail, however.

      • Origami Isopod

        I’m so glad Dilan’s here to give us his Deeply Informed Dudely View on what is and isn’t appropriate outrage, and what is and isn’t about rape culture. Much appreciated.

      • veleda_k

        Thank you so much for explaining rape culture to me! Also thank you for explaining the nature of my outrage. I just don’t know what a silly, inferior-brained creature like myself would do without wise, truly objective dudes to explain why rape jokes are no big deal.

      • tsam

        THE DRINK LITERALLY HAS PILL CAPSULES FLOATING IN IT.

        I don’t get your mind, man. You seem to love this devil’s advocate role, and it gets you nowhere but shot to the top of everyone’s shit list.

        I’d stipulate to your stipulation that this drink (even if we’re allowing as a variable that the person who thought this was a good idea is a clueless fucking idiot), is insulting as all fucking hell.

        Does someone REALLY need to explain to you that a critical part of critical thinking is trying to view something like this from the perspective of a woman who has actually been drugged and raped? Like really?

        • Dilan Esper

          It’s still phony outrage. Indeed, a lot of the commentary here is quite dishonest.

          Let me put it this way. If I got my way on campus drinking, I would stop a lot of rapes. If the people who are arguing with me got their way on these sorts of jokes, they would not stop any.

          So maybe we should stop thinking that people’s feelings being hurt is the most important thing in the world. Especially when said people are lying about them anyway and have told or laughed at similar jokes themselves. (If not about Cosby, certainly about Simpson.)

          • If it wasn’t for bad faith, you wouldn’t have no faith at all.

          • veleda_k

            Wow, I am so impressed by your far superior anti-rape efforts. If only those empty minded feminists weren’t such girls, so they could see how wise and wonderful your total lack of outrage is.

            I am extra impressed by your ability to look inside my mind and know that I’ve told rape jokes about Cosby and Simpson. I’m surprised, because I have absolutely no memory of ever telling or laughing at such jokes, and I consider the idea abhorrent. But if you say so, then you must be right.

  • veleda_k

    The market fixes everything! Except when the market manages to punish rape culture. Then the market is being tragically interfered with by wicked SJW.

    • Origami Isopod

      Now let’s be fair! When it punishes homophobia or racism, that’s also tragic interference by SJWs.

    • Linnaeus

      Am I the only one here who frequently reads “SJWs” as “S1Ws”?

  • Dilan Esper

    Years ago a local Peruvian restaurant in Westwood sold a “rompe calzon” cocktail. They only got away with it because a lot of people didn’t know the translation.

  • Joseph Slater

    I thought about possible answers to the actual question of the post, and the best I could do was Bloody Mary — which refers to some pretty awful historical events — but you know what they say about tragedy + time.

  • I’ve been to bars that have some pretty crude jokes for cocktail names, but these were dive bars and dance clubs. What’s odd about this one is that it’s the only joke on the menu, and otherwise it seems like they’re going for an upscale look. I suspect there’s at least one other Bill Cosby-themed drink on a bar menu somewhere in America that has gone unnoticed because it’s on the same menu as a Rigorous Buggering On The Beach and a Bukowski’s Bath Water or whatever.

    From a practical perspective, garnishing a drink with fake pills seems like a terrible idea in a world where people actually put real pills in drinks at bars.

    • nixnutz

      I used to go to a bar called the Chatterbox which was sort of Johnny Thunders themed. I can imagine them doing something adjacent to this but I really don’t think they’d go with an explicit roofie angle.

      As far as the market angle it just seems like basic marketing, you can’t be an upscale restaurant that caters mainly to creeps.

    • Origami Isopod

      Not that I’m contradicting anything you’re saying, but there are “crude” jokes about sex or drugs (the Rigorous Buggering might be quite consensual, for all we know; and Bukowski capitalized on his hard-drinking image), and then there are jokes about a crime whose perps are seldom punished and whose victims are stigmatized.

      • Oh, certainly. I was mostly just surprised by how out-of-place it was.

    • N__B

      On the crudeness scale, the worst I’ve seen is a drink consisting of a shot of Bailey’s Cream in a rocks glass full of grenadine. You get a small wrinkled brown blob in a sea of red. It’s called a Floating Abortion. I don’t find it funny, and it’s problematic in that it can be used by the forced-birther types, but IMO it’s not a direct attack on anyone the way the Pill Cosby is.

  • mikeSchilling

    Is the Marion Barry served in a cracked glass?

    • mikeSchilling

      The only proper way to order it s “Bitch, set one up!”

  • Roger Ailes

    The Juice is Loose: Orange juice and Ex-Lax

    The Rapefruit: Orange-colored grapefruit juice and Trump Vodka

    The McCrory: Liquified urinal cakes, straight

    The Nick Gillespie: Ancient Age and bits of stale tripe, served in one cup

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