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Our Qualified, Intelligent Political Leaders

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Mark Meadows, (Lunatic-NC) and critical player in TrumpCare passing the House:

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), — who played a pivotal role in including state waiver options in AHCA — hadn’t read the full report yet, but initially said he saw it as “good news.”

When reporters pointed out the portion of the CBO report saying individuals with preexisting conditions in waiver states would be charged higher premiums and could even be priced out of the insurance market — destabilizing markets in those states — under AHCA, Meadows seemed surprised.

“Well, that’s not what I read,” Meadows said, putting on his reading glasses and peering at the paragraph on the phone of a nearby reporter.

The CBO predicted:

“…the waivers in those states would have another effect: Community-rated premiums would rise over time, and people who are less healthy (including those with preexisting or newly acquired medical conditions) would ultimately be unable to purchase comprehensive non-group health insurance at premiums comparable to those under current law, if they could purchase it at all — despite the additional funding that would be available under H.R. 1628 to help reduce premiums.”

Republicans insisted in the days after AHCA’s passage that the health care bill would not weaken protections for preexisting conditions, citing the plan’s high-risk pools for sick people.

Critics argue those high-risk pools are not adequately funded, though. The Center for American Progress projected, before House Republicans passed AHCA in May, that its high-risk pools “would fall short by at least $19.7 billion per year, or by about $200 billion over 10 years.”

The CBO analysis was likewise adamant that AHCA’s current high-risk pool funding isn’t enough to cover sick people if states use the mandate waivers.

After reading the paragraph, Meadows told reporters he would go through the CBO analysis more thoroughly and run the numbers, adding he would work to make sure the high-risk pools are properly funded.

Meadows, suddenly emotional, choked back tears and said, “Listen, I lost my sister to breast cancer. I lost my dad to lung cancer. If anybody is sensitive to preexisting conditions, it’s me. I’m not going to make a political decision today that affects somebody’s sister or father because I wouldn’t do it to myself.”

He continued:

“In the end, we’ve got to make sure there’s enough funding there to handle preexisting conditions and drive down premiums. And if we can’t do those three things, then we will have failed.”

Meadows indicated he would support less-conservative changes to provide more funding for high-risk pools in the Senate, if needed.

The man literally has no idea what it is his own bill or how it will affect people, despite people talking about this ever since this horrible idea began. But, hey, those people were liberals. And so are those CBO hippies so I’m sure the magic math behind TrumpCare will totally work. That’s Jesus math right there.

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  • “In the end, we’ve got to make sure there’s enough funding there to handle preexisting conditions and drive down premiums. And if we can’t do those three things, then we will have failed.”

    One way to not fail would be to not repeal the ACA…

  • JDM

    I’m not going to make a political decision today that affects somebody’s sister or father because I wouldn’t do it to myself.

    Of course you’re not going to do it today. You already did it. Idiot. Hypocritical idiot. Hypocritical hateful idiot.

  • Scrooge

    What a bunch of crocodile tears. Mark Meadows wasn’t willing to vote for the original AHCA, but once they put in the specific provisions he lobbied for, which made it more cruel — like he wanted — he voted for it. Now he’s terribly, terribly sad they put those provisions in, and by the way, he’s an innocent lamb who had no idea what was going on!

    Please.

    In the immortal, but barely audible, words of Marco Rubio, “This notion that [Mark Meadows] doesn’t know what he’s doing is just not true. He knows exactly what he’s doing.”

  • DamnYankees

    Serious question – at what point did we reach the tipping point where the majority of the members of actual elected Republicans ceased being the con artists and actually were the marks?

    Like, in 1994, I don’t get the sense that most Republicans in Congress actually were idiots who got high on their own supply. But it really seems like now at least 2/3 of the elected GOP members of Congress are genuine idiots who live in a closed information bubble and don’t even realize they are spouting nonsense.

    When was the turn? Or am I romanticizing the past and there isn’t one?

    • 94 is the critical turning point, but 2010 is the real divide.

      • Pete

        Yes. The crowd elected in 2010 by the Tea Party are not unlike a bunch of tired 6 year olds with crayons being tasked to run the school.

    • CrunchyFrog

      1994 was probably the turning point.

      When Heritage got started their focus was the Presidency, and they succeeded with Reagan. A contemporaneous view of the White House visitor logs (by a young Michael Kinsey, no less) found that Heritage leaders were frequent visitors to the WH and always before every important decision. They compromised and supported GHWB, but even prior to losing the WH in 1992 decided that they needed to also address Congress.

      The early 1990s was much different than the GOP today. Back then the campaign funding was largely coordinated and focused – now every tinpot billionaire has his own favorite son to back, and this creates a problem for them. Back then the candidates recruited for what would ultimately be the 1994 sweep into Congress were hard right Gingrichites, as nutty and as divorced from reality as he is. And that process continued through the 1990s.

      That’s how it got started. But now, 2 decades later, the problem is that every Congressional candidate has been absorbing right wing media propaganda since the birth of Fox in 1996 and the concurrent boom in right wing media sites that became their go-to place for all news and information. The problem is that the people the GOP is electing to Congress actually believe the lies they tell the proles to keep them in line. Furthermore, none of them places any value in the processes involved with actual governing. Growing up (as it were) on hate media they imagine that politics is all about posturing and attacking the bad guys. Few of them have a fricking clue about the art of compromise in making things happen.

      ETA: posted before reading Loomis reply.

      • Hondo

        Yes, this is a good summary.

      • Pete

        +1

  • njorl

    “In the end, we’ve got to make sure there’s enough funding there to handle preexisting conditions and drive down premiums. And if we can’t do those three things, then we will have failed.”

    We failed. What a shame.
    Moneyfight!

  • ScottK

    He stepped on the mine, heard the *click*, and now he’s looking for a way out that doesn’t involve an explosion and dis-Member of Congress-ment.

    He’s the one that laid the mine in the first place though, so I’m not feeling the sympathy.

    • JDM

      He’s the one that laid the mine in the first place though, so I’m not feeling the sympathy.

      And here’s how that happened: “Okay, the pamphlet says lay the mine down and arm it. Gee, wonder if it’s really armed. Better check…”

      Probably doublechecks his gas gauge with a Zippo at the filler cap, too.

      • Hondo

        Brother Maynard read the wrong chapter of the Book of Armaments. Meadows thought he was deploying the Holy Burning Dogshit Bag, and got confused about who was supposed to step on it.

  • Blathering Christopher

    Dear Rep. Meadows: Fuck you, you fucking fucker.
    Sincerely,
    Blathering Christopher.

    P.S. Seriously, fuck you.

  • The Great God Pan

    The man literally has no idea what [is in] his own bill or how it will affect people,

    Pfff. Any community theatre actor can “choke back tears.” He knows what the bill does and his father and sister are probably alive and well.

  • efgoldman

    Assume a sliding scale, 100% evil at one end, 100% stupid at the other.
    Mouth-breathing, knuckle-dragging RWNJ flying monkeys like this klown have the pointer oscillating so fast from one end to the other, it will achieve escape velocity pretty soon.
    And there are over 200 of the fuckers!

  • Cassiodorus

    Part of me wants to make him personally re-inter his sister with a grave he has to dig with a spoon. The only thing that keeps that from being the whole of me that he’s probably still be too stupid to realize why he’s having to do it.

  • AMK

    White people will be affected? Let me run the numbers.

    • pseudalicious

      Exactly. Exactly.

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