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Poor Little Marco. These protestors are so mean that pretty soon the only place in Florida that will rent him an office will be in Rick Scott’s Skeletor lair.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) has now lost two Sunshine State offices where constituents frequently gathered to push him to hold a town hall, the Washington Post reported Tuesday.

A week after the landlord of Rubio’s office in Tampa declined to renew its lease over the protests, the owner of his Jacksonville office made the same decision, also citing the large crowds who gathered outside the building. The Jacksonville property manager said protests were disruptive for patients visiting a center for children with mental health issues that is adjacent to Rubio’s office, according to the report.

Rubio spokeswoman Christina Mandreucci lamented in a statement to the Post that the “unruly behavior of some anti-Trump protesters” was causing the two small offices to shutter, though she acknowledged that most people turning up to voice disapproval for Rubio “have done so in a productive and respectful way.”

The Florida senator has so far resisted calls to hold a town hall on replacing the Affordable Care Act and other key issues under consideration, saying it would be unproductive to have protesters “heckle and scream at me.”

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  • busker type

    No one deserves this more. What a little shit.

    • efgoldman

      No one deserves this more.

      I disagree; any number of RWNJ politicians deserve it. Although I don’t know about “more.”

      • busker type

        Marco, along with about 45 GOP senators and maybe 20 congressmen are in the “need this to the maximum extent that it is possible to need a thing” category. All other republicans also need it.

      • Judas Peckerwood

        No need for an Eternal Damnation Olympics, people!

        • Snarki, child of Loki

          No need for an Eternal Damnation Olympics, people!

          ALL ARE WINNERS, AND ALL MUST RECEIVE PRIZES.

      • sigaba

        I agree. A lot of people deserve this more, Rubio is beneath deserving anything.

        But insofar as this produces desired policy outcomes, FIRE AWAY. Consider the person and character of Marco Rubio to be redundant.

    • Yup. But hey, if he doesn’t want to meet with his constituents prior to election day, then he can deal with the aftermath post election. Which is what gets me. Do these guys think they are so safe in their little gerrymandered districts that they can just blow off their constituents and not pay the price?

      • Snarki, child of Loki

        It is really amazing the extent to which, by opposing climate change action, the GOP is working to gerrymander the State of Florida.

        • I do have to wonder how many electoral votes Florida will have in a few decades when everything south of Tampa is under water.

          • Optimist. We’ll be left with the panhandle and nothing else – proof that there truly is no God.

      • Derelict

        Ah, but they can blow off their constituents and pay no price. Way too many voters, and especially Florida voters, simply vote party line without regard to the person they’re voting for. Back when I did political consulting in SW Florida, we ran a candidate for county commissioner who was a dyed-in-the-wool Democrat in a deep-red county. In fact, the county was so reliably Republican that the state party had pretty much stopped funding their local party offices.
        So we were able to get our candidate on the ballot as a Republican. With the (R) after his name, he won handily. He also got re-elected handily. Because his actual policies, voting record, public statements, etc. mattered not a whit! He had the magic (R) next to his name.

    • DrDick

      I do love it when the Invisible Hand reaches out and slaps Republicans upside the head.

  • Allow me to play the world’s saddest song on the world’s smallest violin for my junior senator. Truly, my heart breaks for his plight.

    • Dilan Esper

      Why does everyone view this as hurting Rubio rather than his constituents who might want to be able to see someone at his field office?

      I mean, it’s perfectly fine to hold nonviolent protests at his office, but this thread reminds me of military types who pretend we aren’t targeting civilians when we bomb cities.

      • Abbey Bartlet

        Why does everyone view this as hurting Rubio rather than his constituents who might want to be able to see someone at his field office?

        I mean, it’s perfectly fine to hold nonviolent protests at his office, but this thread reminds me of military types who pretend we aren’t targeting civilians when we bomb cities.

        Your concern is noted.

      • rea

        Why does everyone view this as hurting Rubio rather than his constituents who might want to be able to see someone at his field office?

        Compare and contrast:

        The Florida senator has so far resisted calls to hold a town hall on replacing the Affordable Care Act and other key issues under consideration, saying it would be unproductive to have protesters “heckle and scream at me.”

        • Abbey Bartlet

          You seem to have not noted Dilan’s concern, rea.

      • sibusisodan

        I mean, it’s perfectly fine to hold nonviolent protests at his office, but

        If it’s perfectly fine, why did you add words to the sentence after this?

        • Dilan Esper

          Because I think protesters are dishonest about what they are really doing and who they are hurting.

        • Abbey Bartlet

          If it’s perfectly fine, why did you add words to the sentence after this?

          He’s concerned.

      • rhino

        Dilan, are you seriously blaming people protesting for Rubio’s cowardice, and implying that the protesters should be nicer?

        Because I have a hard time believing that’s what you mean, but…

        • Dilan Esper

          No. I am saying they should be honest about what the strategy is (inconveniencing constituents in the hope that they pressure Rubio).

          • Abbey Bartlet

            No. I am saying they should be honest about what the strategy is (inconveniencing constituents in the hope that they pressure Rubio).

            Why would that pressure Rubio? He doesn’t give a fuck about his constituents’ convenience.

      • diogenes

        Were you concerned 8 years ago when the Tea Party used exactly those tactics?

      • Origami Isopod

        Oh, look, Dilan has come to share his contrarianosity and wisdomhood with us!

  • Captain Oblivious

    Rubio still thinks he’s going to be president some day if he continues to do as little as possible.

    • Judas Peckerwood

      Worked for Ronnie and Donnie, among others — why not for Little Marco?!!!

      • sigaba

        Marco has too much shame and self-awareness to spoil the formula.

        He is, literally, not stupid enough, or callous enough, to be a Movement Conservative President.

        • Judas Peckerwood

          I think that you overunderestimate him.

        • Derelict

          I agree with Judas Peckerwood: Rubio is very stupid, and utterly lacking in self-awareness. He has no shame, and he is extremely callous.

          But don’t take my word for it. Even a cursory review of his public comments and record amply demonstrates all of these things.

        • I think we need to dispel with this fiction that Marco Rubiobot is smart or has any idea what he’s doing. He has no idea what he’s doing.

    • Captain C

      To be fair, the more he does, the less likely it is that anyone would ever vote for him for president.

  • Dennis Orphen

    Off topic Erik, but I had to tell you: I ran into an acquaintance tonight. He said he had something for me, reached into his shoulder bag and whipped out a DVD copy of John Hanson and Rob Nilsson’s Prairie Trilogy, the documentaries on the North Dakota Nonpartisan League.

    • You have interesting friends

      • Dennis Orphen

        Holler if you need a copy.

        • I’ve never seen it and certainly wouldn’t mind seeing it

          • Dennis Orphen

            On it. Send it to your office where you teach?

            • Send it to the History Department. Or just put it in my name and send it to URI. It will get to me.

              Thanks!

  • randy khan

    I really hope some D-side super pac starts running ads soon about Rs who are avoiding town halls.

    • jamesepowell

      Along the same lines, I don’t know why the Democratic Party or some affiliated entities are not running 21st century Harry & Louise ads to attack what the RWers are going to do to the ACA.

      • Derelict

        The fact that we’re NOT seeing anything like this tells you everything you need to know about the present state of the Democratic Party. If the roles were reversed and the GOP was fighting this, your TV would be bursting with ads against this bill. In fact, IIRC, my TV was bursting with ads against the ACA and the stimulus bills back when those were on the floor. And these days, I’m seeing ads urging me to call my Senators to support Gorsuch.

        From the Democrats? Nothing. In the words of Casey Stengel, doesn’t anybody here know how to play this gme?

        • sibusisodan

          The fact that we’re NOT seeing anything like this tells you everything you need to know about the present state of the Democratic Party.

          The text of the bill has been available for, what, 24h now?

          This is like complaining that the response to the SOTU hasn’t been given a week before the address.

          If the D’s don’t end up producing such ads, given a reasonable amount of time to produce and distribute them, have at them.

          Before then, it doesn’t tell us anything about the state of the D’s as all.

          • Derelict

            Gotta disagree. Even without the actual bill in hand, Democrats knew a slew of relevant facts about it. For example, everyone knew that the bill would cause millions of people to lose coverage. We might not have known the actual number of people, but “millions” would have been absolutely accurate.

            Knowing this, why aren’t there a set of canned spots: “Republicans introduced their version of Repeal and Replace, but their plan deprives millions of Americans of their current health coverage. Say ‘NO!’ to Republicans’ cruel charade . . .”

            Waiting for the actual bill so you can criticize small and specific points is both foolish and counterproductive. Attack with broad strokes against known elements, and do so immediately. That has proven quite effective, and Democrats need to start doing it.

            • sibusisodan

              Even without the actual bill in hand, Democrats knew a slew of relevant facts about it.

              This is kinda true, but weak. We didn’t know anything about the bill. We had some accurate predictions.

              But until there’s something to debate, there’s literally nothing to push back on.

              I agree that a super organised group could have produced effective broad strokes ads of the type you describe. I don’t think the D’s not having done that yet tells you much about them.

              But it’s a good idea – could you push it up the line just in case?

              • rhino

                There may be a financial consideration. Huge TV buys are pricey, and this far from an election, not something to be undertaken lightly.

                Besides, with republicans themselves doing such a good job of opposing the bill, democrats can, to some extent, sit back with popcorn and enjoy.

        • Hogan

          It wasn’t Republicans who ran the Harry and Louise ads; it was health insurance lobbyists.

          • rhino

            Very good point. What powerful industries stand to gain if the ACA remains as is, vs the bill succeeding.

            And to what extent would those industries believe it possible to successfully kill the bill through a campaign of some sort.

        • leftwingfox

          How many of those ads would be run by the RNC as opposed to affiliated lobbyist groups?

          (Whoops, nesting. Sorry Hogan!)

          • Hogan

            It’s worth repeating.

    • Adam.379

      For extra irony they could tweak one of Mitch’s famous ads.

      • cpinva

        geeze, what a slimeball. he (McConnell) has wanted to violate the Bill of Rights ever since he started running for public office (wants prayer in public schools, etc.). KY, 10 last names, 5 million people!

  • Judas Peckerwood

    Damn you, George Soros!

  • JdLaverty

    Hehehe cosmic justice

  • Murc

    The Florida senator has so far resisted calls to hold a town hall on replacing the Affordable Care Act and other key issues under consideration, saying it would be unproductive to have protesters “heckle and scream at me.”

    I’ve always found professional politicians complete lack of ability to deal with this sort of thing puzzling.

    Leaving aside for the moment whether or not Rubio deserves to be heckled and screamed at (spoilers: yes) dealing with that is actually very simple. You stop talking. You stop even attempting to talk. You fold your hands together, lean on the podium, and give the heckler (or a group of them, you can pick if there’s more than one) your very best “teacher is VERY DISAPPOINTED in you, class” stare.

    What that does is shift the entire focus of everyone in the room to the person you’re staring at. Once you’ve stopped talking, attention is going to gravitate to the person who is. They’re suddenly not hiding in the anonymity of the crowd anymore; they’re the center of that crowds attention. This makes lots and lots of people self-conscious, and it also tends to break their train of thought because heckling is easy, but extemporaneous public speaking is real hard. It’s also exhausting.

    They’ll break before you do. I guarantee it. Then you can get back to saying what you wanted to say.

    The only way this can backfire is if they’re prepared for it and have a speech prepared… in which case, then you can heckle back from the podium.

    This seems like a much better strategy than constantly standing in front of a crowd trying to talk and getting jeered down, which only makes you look like a weak, foolish bumbler.

    I mean. This is basic “how to control a room” social dynamics. Shouldn’t politicians get that?

    • Captain Oblivious

      Or, you could just have security remove the hecklers. The great majority of “protestors”, which apparently has become code for “constituents who disagree with my positions”, are well-behaved at these things, with maybe the odd chant in response to a stupid statement.

      Rubio just doesn’t want to have to answer questions. He doesn’t want to be on record supporting the current GOP agenda, especially regarding immigration and Social Security and Medicare. These are bullet-vote issues for a lot of Floridians, and he’s at least smart enough to know that.

      He’s a lazy freerider (worst attendance record in the Senate, never introduces any meaningful legislation), and he’s a political coward.

      • Murc

        Or, you could just have security remove the hecklers.

        You usually don’t wanna do that unless it is completely and obviously justified, because reporters love to write “Town Hall Turns Ugly” stories with photographs of your goons hauling folks away.

        • GeorgeBurnsWasRight

          I’m pretty sure most Republicans would cheer “goons hauling folks away” and cheer even louder if the goons also beat the people in plain sight.

          • Tyto

            This. I recently passed a truck with two stickers on the window: “Runs on Liberal Tears” and “Nobody cares about your protest.” The latter was accompanied by a stick SUV scattering stick figure bodies. Collectively, a perfect illustration of the mindset.

    • John Revolta

      They couldn’t be worried about people exercising their…………..2nd Amendment rights………now could they?

    • cpinva

      Sen. Rubio has spent, as near as I can tell, the entirety of his time in congress, avoiding having any kind of record. he can’t run on it, but challengers can’t run against it. he is a complete cipher. were you to ask any of his supporters (people who not only voted for him, but strongly support him), to tell you why they support him, what legislation he’s created (whether or not it passed), what policies, (created by other republicans in the FL legislature), he wouldn’t be able to provide any. he isn’t even Zelig-like, he’s just translucent.

    • sibusisodan

      Shouldn’t politicians get that?

      They should. But people elected within a framework of ‘govt is the problem’ have next to no incentive to try.

    • rhino

      That technique works against hecklers. It does not work at all against professional speakers who are there to take control of your meeting away from you… Something I have done a time or two in the past. (not that I am a pro, but the times I did it, neither was my opponent)

      One of the reasons politicians hate town halls is they can sometimes be debates, debates where they don’t even know who the opponent is going to be. That’s no excuse for refusing to face your constituents, mind you, but it’s still an influence on how, when, and how frequently a pol wants to do them.

  • Snarki, child of Loki

    The Jacksonville property manager said protests were disruptive for patients visiting a center for children with mental health issues that is adjacent to Rubio’s office, according to the report.

    And now little Marco has lost his safe space. Sad.

  • Owlbear1

    Then it is time to start demanding Town Hall meetings in front of the local properties of the Rich Guys who put Rubio in office.

    They can’t sign a new rental agreement nearly as easy as Rubio.

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