Home / General / Erik Visits an American Grave, Part 20

Erik Visits an American Grave, Part 20

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This is the grave of Martin Luther King, Jr.

2016-01-09 16.18.21

Martin Luther King is a man who gave one speech in his life. In that speech he talked about dreams in such a vague way that he actually meant to give support to whatever conservative talking point happens to be in vogue today. King had no interest in economic justice, opposing the war in Vietnam, building an inclusive society, desegregating housing and schools except in the most formal legal way, or fighting against white supremacy. Nope, he was just a man with a vague dream.

Martin Luther King, Jr and Coretta Scott King are buried at the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site, Atlanta, Georgia.

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  • CP

    This is gold.

  • Thom

    Yep. And Rosa Parks was just tired that day.

  • Nobdy

    My understanding is that what was important to Dr. King was not being divisive. He wanted black and white people to come together and be as brothers, embracing white supremacy and the violent oppression of black people by the police TOGETHER, as brothers would embrace.

    Also he would have hated black history month because there’s no white history month.

    And he also wanted blacks and whites to come together and embrace very attractive deals on bedding, fitness apparel, furniture, and more.

    • Thirtyish

      He wanted black and white people to come together and be as brothers,

      But he certainly didn’t want black and white people to come together as partners, parents, and families, the likes of which are seen in breakfast product commercials, because that would be divisive.

      • N__B

        Breakfast-product commercials are particularly divisive when they show people putting ketchup on eggs.

        • Malaclypse

          That’s because you should be using sriracha.

          • N__B

            “People” in my comment sure as hell did not mean me.* I’m pro-ketchup for lunch and dinner, but its use with breakfast is an abomination.

            * I AM NOT A PEOPLE. I AM A FREE MAN BEAR.

            • Bill Murray

              who is #2?

              • N__B

                Based on appearance, texture, and smell, I’d say Ted Cruz.

        • Thom

          And vodka in their coffee.

          • I like my coffee like I like my women, black, with a healthy dose of Jameson in them and covered in whipped cream.

            • Judas Peckerwood

              You forgot the ketchup.

              • I like my women like I like my fries, hot and salty but without ketchup because I’m not some kind of freak but whatever turns you on dude.

                • N__B

                  I like my women like I like my steak: tough, chewy, and slightly singed.

            • Snarki, child of Loki

              “I like my coffee like I like my women: HOT, black, with a healthy dose of Jameson in them and covered in whipped cream”

              FIFY

    • CP

      Also, the main point of Martin Luther King’s career was protecting hapless white people from the terrorism of Malcolm X and his Black Panthers.
      /X-Men

  • D.N. Nation

    Welcome to the O4W.

  • Kurzleg

    This probably goes without saying, but it’s really worth the trip. You can visit the grave and his birth home plus the museum. Seeing the grave is a very powerful experience, or at least it was for me.

    I don’t know if it was permanent thing or not, but at the time of my visit the museum had perhaps the most chilling exhibit I’ve ever seen: a gallery of lynching photos. As you walked down a hallway to the exhibit, “Strange Fruit” sung by Billie Holiday was playing. That, in itself, was awfully chilling even before you got to the exhibit proper.

    • howard

      i have never had the heart to go, but you can see the room at the lorraine motel where he was killed as part of the national civil rights museum in memphis.

      and there is a rumor that he wrote a letter once; you can see the jail door behind which he composed it at the birmingham civil rights institute.

  • brad

    “I hereby validate the beliefs of whoever quotes me with the authority of my name” – Gandhi or Einstein or Churchill, probably.

    • Jestak

      Nope, this was said by Thomas Jefferson. :)

      • heckblazer

        I thought it was Jesus…

        • Keaaukane

          George Orwell.

          • Malaclypse

            Lincoln.

            • Origami Isopod

              Twain.

              • Thom

                Oscar Wilde

    • YRUasking

      “I may not agree with what you say, but I’ll defend to the death your right to say I said it” – Voltaire

      • Snarki, child of Loki

        +1789

      • Hogan

        “I wish I hadn’t said that.”

        You did, Oscar, you did.”

  • FlaMark

    I’ll never forgive/forget the classless. disgusting behavior by the Bush family cracking jokes and laughing at Coretta Kings funeral.

    MLK was the bravest American I ever saw. Growing up in the white suburbia of the South, I saw all those “Christians” foam at the mouth calling him a n-commie and praying for his death at the mention of his name. Having just moved out of Georgia back to Fla. last year, I can tell you in many ways. the racism is just as bad as it was in 1966.

    • Woodrowfan

      that’s because he was a Republican and they were Democrats, probably liberals.

    • Jonny Scrum-half

      What was the classless, disgusting behavior?

  • joe from Lowell

    Martin Luther King is a man who gave one speech in his life. In that speech he talked about dreams in such a vague way that he actually meant to give support to whatever conservative talking point happens to be in vogue today. King had no interest in economic justice, opposing the war in Vietnam, building an inclusive society, desegregating housing and schools except in the most formal legal way, or fighting against white supremacy. Nope, he was just a man with a vague dream.

    This leaves out the most important part of Dr. King’s legacy, the part that explains why he is truly beloved in American culture: he told black people not to be violent.

    • weirdnoise

      Unless that violence was in South Vietnam.

  • gusmpls

    Typical lefty. You forgot to mention he was a Republican.

  • Big Al

    Erik, you were in my neighborhood, and you didn’t even call? Damn…

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