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The Environment in Which Trump Can Thrive

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Some sage wisdom from the “Most Powerful Conservative in America,” everybody:

In addition to the obvious, I would bet dollars to beef and broccoli lunch specials that the “Asian food” the Ericksons were abstaining from was Chinese food.

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  • Linnaeus

    It would sound petty enough if, instead of “Asian food”, Erickson had specified “Japanese food” (assuming his parents knew what that was). But this? Christ.

    • ThrottleJockey

      Well at least we now know why he’s such a colossal asshole. With parents like that he was practically destined to be.

    • Emily68

      Where would the Ericksons have found any Japanese food in the US before the 1980s or so? I certainly don’t remember seeing any. I lived in the San Francisco burbs all through the 1960s and it never once occurred to me that there was such a thing as Japanese food.

      • J. Otto Pohl

        I remember there being Japanese restaurants in Boston in the 1970s since one of my father’s fellow grad students was from Sapporo and took us to one once. I am also quite sure they existed in Sacramento before the 1980s. Some of the Japanese places there I have eaten at I am pretty sure date back to the 1960s.

        • sparks

          Maybe further back than that, though I’m not sure which Japanese restaurants you went to. The family owned places have mostly gone now, the kids have no interest in running them. Same happened with most of the better Italian places in town.

      • cpinva

        the first Japanese restaurant I recall encountering was around 1981, when I went to Las Vegas for a business convention. before that, only Chinese.

      • advocatethis

        I remember having chicken teriyaki in fourth grade in 1969 – that was in Saratoga. But my teacher was pretty cosmopolitan, having been in the Peace Corps.

      • Just_Dropping_By

        Wikipedia says Erickson was born in 1975 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erick_Erickson) and that he lived in Dubai from the time he was 5 until he was 15, so it seems the relevant question is what was the availability of Japanese and/or Asian food in Dubai during the 1980s.

        • Ya beat me. Happy Pearl Harbor Day. Most of the Asian food in Dubai would have been Indian-Pakistani-Bangladeshi by the mid-80s, I’m sure the Erichssöhne were boycotting the chicken tikka masala one day a year as a way of demonstrating their refusal to forgive the bucktoothed Nips. But there would have been plenty of Chinese food too (I know there were direct flights to and from Singapore, I had a layover there once for hours in their awful duty-free acres).

        • Richard Gadsden

          Dubai is in Asia, so I guess that Asian food was pretty widely available.

      • Richard Hershberger

        Benihana apparently has been around since the 1960s. I was aware of it in the late ’70s.

        • Latverian Diplomat

          Teppanyaki style was very popular with the American occupying troops, and that’s probably why it was the most common form of Japanese restaurant here in the US in the decades following the war. Often called a “Japanese Steakhouse”.

    • AlanInSF

      After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Erickson’s parents were rabid proponents of going to war with China.

      Literally, rabid. Had to get the painful shots in the stomach and everything. Doctors warned them their progeny would be affected, but they didn’t listen. Because, of course.

  • tsam

    Fuck you, Erickson. Go to hell and die.

    • DrDick

      This is the douchebag that shot up then NYT because he did not like their front page editorial.

      • Warren Terra

        shot up a copy of the NYT

        Just correcting because he’s an idiot, but not (so far) a murderous idiot.

        • Thirtyish

          He may not be murderous per se, but stunt or not, involving a gun in his temper tantrum is pretty goddamn concerning.

          • Malaclypse

            It’s almost like Responsible Gun Owners ™ are a marketing slogan rather than a reality.

        • cpinva

          “Just correcting because he’s an idiot, but not (so far) a murderous idiot.”

          I must take exception, he’s been murdering the English language for years now, that has to count as a felony bad usage charge.

        • brad

          However, it’s also well worth noting he’s now given many assholes who aren’t otherwise good at connecting neurons the idea in the back of their heads.
          Which is to say add a newsroom to the list of inevitable targets of the not done by brown people and thus random acts of nature mass shootings.

        • His grouping was really shitty too.

          Apparently he shoots about as well as he writes.

          • DrDick

            The very epitome of responsible Republican gun ownership.

          • JL

            I’m glad I’m not the only person for whom that was their reaction.

      • Mike G

        Getting so angry and lacking self-control that you shoot up a newspaper article isn’t exactly a great argument for gun rights.

  • rea

    My mom never had any problem with Asian food, despite the members of our family captured at Bataan.

    On the other hand, she didn’t have any problem with working on the Manhattan Project, either.

  • sleepyirv

    Dr. Hibbert: You don’t forget a thing like Siamese twins!
    Lisa: I believe they prefer to be called “conjoined twins.”
    Dr. Hibbert: And idiots prefer “children of WWII.” But it ain’t gonna happen.

    • postmodulator

      I mean, we already knew his parents were too dumb to think up a name.

  • J. Otto Pohl

    I came from a family even more right wing than myself in California and all of my relatives definitely distinguished the Chinese, Japanese, and Americans of Japanese heritage as three distinct groups. The Chinese were our Asian allies then led by the extremely corrupt Chiang Kai Shek. The Japanese were a political nation led by Emperor Hirohito that was at war with the US and engaged in awful atrocities in Asia. Americans of Japanese heritage were Americans whose parents who had immigrated from Japan and had been wrongly interned in concentration camps along with those parents by the liberal FDR administration.

    • jim, some guy in iowa

      conservatives- or even reactionaries- were never particularly bothered by Chiang Ka-shek’s corruption though were they?

      • J. Otto Pohl

        My grandfather spoke about it after the US lifted the gag rule on his service in China. That was in 1986 only two years before he died. But, he noted that his main job as an OSS officer to supply the KMT was impossible in large part due to corruption.

      • Malaclypse

        Try and remember that J Otto inhabits a world where conservatives regularly denounce Israel and stand up for Palestinians. I expect this to all be resolved in the upcoming Crisis of Infinite J Ottos story arc.

        • Hogan

          We’ll finally learn whether Ghana Prime has a red sun.

          • postmodulator

            Best Thread Ever Of The Week.

          • Malaclypse

            Either way, this will be the saddest Origin Story ever.

          • wjts

            I look forward to the cover featuring Otto cradling the body of the dear departed Brad Potts.

        • jim, some guy in iowa

          this is one of the only times I’ve ever thought the word “crisis” was an understatement

        • DAS

          A real conservative would denounce a country whose key founders were socialists and whose mythos heavily invoked collectivist farming institutions and would stand up for a nationalist movement based on nostalgia for a life in a homeland that wasn’t nearly as wonderful as those in the movement imagine it to be.

          That many so-called conservatives are pro-Israel and that many on the left do more than merely stand up for Palestinians (who really did get the short end of the stick) but rather embrace their nationalism says a lot about so-called conservatives and a lot about a certain class of “leftist”

      • Scott P.
        • royko

          What the hell is wrong with that family?

          • Captain Splendid

            They’re blue bloods.

            • DrDick

              (In)breeding will tell!

              • I’ve always been amazed that they didn’t have some kind of obvious Hapsburg jaw.

          • BiloSagdiyev

            Years ago, I read that the whole focus of the household was on competition, not so much the learning and the knowledge. This fits in with that story, eh? As does Jeb! running for office, because, hey, higher elected office, and a point on the board for the family.

            • Kitty Kelly tells some hair raising stories about just how ugly competitive the family was including stories of just plain cheating for adults to gain a competitive advantage over children.

              • Mike G

                There were similar stories about Rmoney — being too vain to accept losing at extended family social games at the summer house, changing the rules after the fact to favor himself. Sociopaths, all of them.

                • I think it goes hand in hand with a kind of tribalist attitude towards family vs. outsiders, as well. Any kind of behavior is tolerated within the group, so long as it stays in the group.

              • Manny Kant

                Hey, the Battle of Waterloo was one largely because of Wellington’s utter devotion to cheating in order to beat younger students on the playing fields of Eton. As I understand it.

                • rea

                  The tradition at Eton–as I understand it–is to sneak a bunch of Germans into the game on your side when nobody is looking.

        • apogean

          Please see this incredible “hardball question” for Marco Rubio which explains how the “Sword of Chang” is actually the Spear of Destiny.

          • q-tip

            I also like the questions Alexander proposes putting to Carson and Trump. The Cruz one is a little too full of post-humanist shtick, and my eyes really glazed over at the Fiorina one, although the punchline is pretty good, and I’ve been known to tellthe original brick joke*, so maybe I should shut up.

            * heard it at summer camp in the early 80s, so don’t blame TvTropes for my perversity.

            • Manny Kant

              I do not even slightly understand what the Brick Joke is based on that TV Tropes article, though I imagine I can find several dozen examples of its use in anime and manga. TV Tropes is the fucking worst.

              • q-tip

                There was a link You needed to click. Then click the links on that page after you read the first joke.
                Keep in mind that the entire point is to make the telling as drawn-out as possible to frustrate your audience. The punchline is only funny proportionally to how long you strung the audience along. It is not a funny joke.

                QUASI- SPOILERS: I really like to breeze through the “Brick Joke” fairly quickly (like, 2-3 minutes) – then kill a ton of time on the “airplane joke.” Let people forget about the brick. Describe the plane, people, dog, and cigar in loving detail.

                • q-tip

                  MORE SPOILERS: It works “best*” if you feign ignorance at why nobody gets the brick joke. “You don’t get it? Really? Okay, lemme try one more…”

                  * “best” is analogous to the freshest mayonnaise at the end of the all-day picnic. The only people who enjoy the brick joke are the ones scheming to try it on their friends.

      • DrDick

        Or by the atrocities he committed against his own people.

      • Emily68

        I’ve read somewhere that a derogatory name for Chiang Ka-shek back in the old days was “Cash my check.”

    • Warren Terra

      I can’t help being skeptical about this claim. I’m perfectly willing to believe that in retrospect your right-wing family denounced FDR for this injustice, but rather more dubious that these right-wing Californians were so enlightened at the time it was happening, while the rest of the country notably wasn’t, and at a time when the right wing in California was perfectly happy to see Oklahomans getting beaten up, let alone people of Japanese heritage.

      • J. Otto Pohl

        I am talking about when I was alive. So the 1980s really. But, my grandfather on my mother’s side did have a Japanese American gardner and a Japanese American cleaning lady for decades both of whom had been interned.

        • DrDick

          And they were both so nice, for those kind of people!

          • J. Otto Pohl

            “Those kind of people” is a phrase used by leftist racists like yourself not any conservatives I personally know.

            • DAS

              It is used regularly by the conservatives I personally know

            • solidcitizen

              You really are an amazing man.

            • DrDick

              Oddly, the only people I have ever heard say that, and I grew up in the South under Jim Crow, were conservatives. You are also rather cavalier about calling people racist on no authority at all.

              • Ross Perot rather famously stumbled onto the phrase, or its close cousin “you people” when adressing an audience of African Americans.

        • rm

          My grandmother was a very conservative Reagan-supporting California Republican elite who was reflexively racist towards black people. But she hired a Japanese-American gardener and often talked about the terrible injustice he suffered from the internment, losing everything (home, property, business) and losing the chance at a professional career (I forget which professional career, but it was something specific — his education was derailed and his opportunities taken away).

          You all are quite mean to J Otto because of his offensive quirks (the “racist leftist” jabs really are awful), but that doesn’t mean you should disbelieve this story. It rings true for me because I knew the California Republicans in my family from that era.

      • burritoboy

        You’d be wrong to be skeptical, actually. In San Francisco (but also in other major West Coast port cities), a sizable part of the economy – by the 1920s – was in Far East import / export. This was dominated by wealthy Republican elites in those cities (which were not particularly conservative politically). These elites generally had a acceptable if not always warm relationship with post-imperial China (which was too weak to interfere much in their own commercial activities both in China and in the rest of East Asia). The growing Japanese empire of the 1920s and 1930s cut off or interfered with a lot of that trade, often cutting West Coast ports out of major trade routes.

        That meant that a certain notable subsegment of Republican elites was thrown essentially into a close alliance with the Chiang regime (people should remember that the Republican party was quite strong in California until relatively recently and numerous national figures in the Republican party were Californians – including the first Presidential nominee of the GOP ever).

        That didn’t mean that lower-class conservative racists in the California interior loved Chinese immigrants, of course. It did mean that there was substantial elite discourse in California against the growing Japanese empire, a willingness to work with the Chiang regime, and close personal business ties with some business interests in China. Many prominent businesspeople in San Francisco had close ties to figures with figures within the Chiang regime (many of which were maintained even after that regime fled to Taiwan). That the Democrats lost China in 1948 to the Communists was a very big deal in some quarters of elite Republican opinion in California.

        • burritoboy

          Which, as I think about it, lines up with J Otto’s relative in the OSS who were operating in China. The OSS greatly preferred recruits from an elite economic status, and the people they sent over to the Chiang regime I suppose would be much more likely to be high-status Republicans from California, who would have already had this pro-Chiang outlook.

          • J. Otto Pohl

            Before WWII my grandfather was a soap salesman who immigrated as a child from Canada and was not a US citizen until the 1980s. English was his second language after German. My great grandfather was a farmer from Ukraine. English was his fifth language. When WWII broke out my grandfather was living in a boarding house where he met my grandmother. So no elites there.

            • Malaclypse

              So no elites there.

              You do understand that, in this very thread, you discussed their servants, plural, don’t you?

              • J. Otto Pohl

                That was my other grandfather on my mother’s side. He was actually a Democrat and worked in the Army Corp of Engineers. But, I would hardly call hiring two people for work one day a week having servants. I hire a cleaning woman here for one day a week as well and I make less than anybody else here by orders of magnitude.

                • wjts

                  I hire a cleaning woman here for one day a week as well and I make less than anybody else here by orders of magnitude.

                  Otto, you don’t make less than $130.00 a year. Stop being a goober.

                • Malaclypse

                  You know, what this thread has really lacked was an argument over descriptivist and prescriptivist language use.

                • Fats Durston

                  Ten years ago, an instructor made 10$/day at the University of Dar-es-Salaam. Bottom-of-the-rung servers made 1$/day in the “suburbs” nearby.

                • Lee Rudolph

                  I make less than anybody else here by orders of magnitude.

                  Otto, you don’t make less than $130.00 a year.

                  Binary orders of magnitude, perhaps?

        • LeeEsq

          San Francisco was a Republican voting city from around the time California became a state until the early 1960s. Most people believe that San Francisco was a city of Bohemians, artistic types, and others who don’t socially fit into Middle Class American norms. This hasn’t been the case historically. For most of its history San Francisco was a commercial and industrial port city with a heavy element of small c-conservatism despite it’s reputation as a sinful place.

          • burritoboy

            As a San Franciscan, that’s true and untrue, simultaneously. The city’s history is a mess of deep ethnic, class, economic, cultural and political conflicts. But you’re right that much of San Francisco’s economic life was heavily influenced (but not outright controlled or completely determined) by a small-c conservative elite until the late 1940s or so.

            The artists and bohemian types were indeed also present and culturally important, even within the city’s own official conception of itself as early as the late 19th century. But they had little political or general social influence except that the region’s non-WASP ethnic communities (Irish, Italians, Portuguese etc) were more open to leftier brands of unionization than in other places for whatever reasons, and this made some breathing space for bohemians that wasn’t so easily found elsewhere.

            • LeeEsq

              There was a heavy small c-conservatism in San Francisco’s working class because of the influence of the Catholic Church among other things. They might have been more influenced by leftist forms of unionization but that doesn’t explain about their social beliefs.

              Its not just politics. San Francisco were Republican electoral strongholds on the local, state, and federal level for most of it’s history.

      • q-tip

        I can’t help being skeptical about this claim

        I am skeptical about anything JOtto says about his own supposed conservatism, though I totally believe that he’s still smarting about that time someone called him reactionary in a comment thread.

        I wish I could make this comment somehow related to the superhero origin story Ghanian red sun (Red Son) stuff above.

    • burritoboy

      Many wealthy people in San Francisco were very closely connected with the Chiang regime. Before the Japanese took over, a great deal of San Francisco’s port traffic was import/export to China, and the business elites at the two ends of the trade had long been in alliance.

    • Your family could be completely reactionary but educated. Erichssohn said “Asian food”, not Japanese, not simply because he is a winger but because he is stupid and subliterate.

  • Sometime in the early 90s, my grandparents were visiting and we went to a Chinese restaurant. As we were leaving, some other party was also leaving. They were super upset about their order for some reason or another, said they were never coming back, etc. And then one of them said “And you people should remember who won World War II.”

    Even the 16 year old version of me was like “did I just hear that right? What an idiot.”

    • N__B

      “And you people should remember who won World War II.”

      And that’s why I eat Russian food whenever I can.

      • dmsilev

        And, after 1974, all Americans were required to eat pho.

        Mmmm, pho.

        • Johnnie

          If Nixon had just shown more tenacity I could be getting a cheeseburger for lunch, but instead it will be bahn mi.

          • BiloSagdiyev

            Yeah. He should have shown some leadership.

            • DW

              Well, what do you expect from a liberal?

          • ThrottleJockey

            Side of spring rolls?

            • Barry_D

              No – KETCHUP!!!!!!!!!!11111111!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

              Washed down with vodka ‘martinis’ :)

        • N__B

          A primary source: here.

        • Thirtyish

          Pho doesn’t have enough flavor. Mandatory banh mi is something I could get behind, though.

      • J. Otto Pohl

        The Soviet Union and Russia are not the same. Most of the fighting and dying took place in Ukraine not Russia. Close to 50% of the Red Army were non-Russians and there is no way the Soviets could have won without them despite the claims of Putin worshippers today.

      • ThrottleJockey

        If I’m going Russian, I’m going with vodka not food.

        • Hogan

          More draniki for me.

        • Malaclypse

          Now that is how you troll Erik.

        • Lost Left Coaster

          Done and done. And I do mean done.

        • Thirtyish

          I happen to like vodka, which is among the very few decent culinary exports of Russia that I can think of.

        • Karen24

          Cherry blinis are good, but otherwise, the beet-based cuisine is not ideal.

      • Warren Terra

        “And you people should remember who won World War II.”

        And that’s why I eat Russian food whenever I can.

        This is clearly backwards. If there’s one thing we can learn from British history, it’s that the victor eats the cuisine of the vanquished, not the other way around. Britain was conquered by the Romans, the Vikings, and the French, but Songbirds-and-Dormice, Lutefisk, and Escargot never caught on. On the other hand, Britain ruled the Indian subcontinent with an iron fist, and claims curry is their most popular dish. Britain won two wars in China, and has innumerable Chinese take-aways. They carved up the Ottoman Empire, and love a kabob.

        • Randy

          So a little sauerkraut with sushi? That works for me.

        • ThrottleJockey

          You’ve missed the point. You think the British Empire was about stealing other people’s land? British food is so bad they created an empire to steal other people’s food!

          • Barry_D

            You forgot the weather :)

            They just couldn’t figure out how to move that.

          • Donalbain

            Actually we just wanted more people to play cricket against.

        • The “I drink your mango lassi, I drink it up” theory of culinary imperialism?

          • ajay

            Well, of course. If you say “Warren has eaten Otto’s lunch” the implication is that Warren has been quicker or smarter or whatever than Otto.

            The same applies to the US, of course; there’s an annual dinner when they ceremonially eat the food of the exterminated American Indians (sweet potato, turkey, corn etc), and they’re also very fond of chilli and tacos and so on (at least since the Mexican War).

    • dmsilev

      I’m sure it was just an overly bitter Chiang Kai-shek supporter.

      • Warren Terra

        In terms of misremembered WWII-era Asian history, little will ever top the Bush family’s tradition of “unleashing Chang”.

        • BiloSagdiyev

          Having not read Tuchman’s book yet (give me another 40 years!)… I just read this book:

          http://www.amazon.com/Now-Hell-Will-Start-Soldiers/dp/0143115332

          And learned more about Stilwell and Chang K.S. than I ever knew, and hoo boy, Chang was a useless SOB. I can see how, once he got his ass kicked to Taiwan, would yank the chains of the gullible that, hey, if you only sent me some more supplies and money, why, I’ll go take care of that Mao problem! Did I mention I’d like you to send me supplies and money? Please send them now. Supplies and money, did I mention that?

          Oh, and the book made me realize that before Chalabi, before the Saigon government, there were elites that made a business of getting loot from us and delivering resul…. uh, say, could you send more loot?

          • Warren Terra

            The Tuchman book is worth a read.

          • jim, some guy in iowa

            and there were always people on the ground who saw what was going on and caught hell for telling Washington that their pet dictator was nothing more than a grifter in military dress

            • Philip

              Most of them were, of course, purged from State shortly thereafter.

          • Jean-Michel

            This is actually somewhat backwards. It’s true that Chiang was totally disingenuous about that “retake the mainland” stuff; we know from his diaries that he felt that he would never return to China in his lifetime and reunification would probably require an internal collapse of the Communist regime. But the “retake the mainland” stuff justified the oppressive military-state apparatus in Taiwan, and could be used to game the U.S. precisely because it didn’t want him to try it—successive U.S. administrations knew full well that the ROC army couldn’t possibly defeat its mainland counterpart, and that any attack on the mainland would force the U.S. to either enter the war or sit back and let the Communists take Taiwan. (This is why U.S.-ROC arms sales and defense treaties came with an understanding that Chiang wouldn’t launch an offensive without the cooperation of the U.S.)

            Chiang most famously exploited this in the early ’60s, when he had to deal with a president (JFK) who had openly expressed a willingness to cut loose Kinmen and Matsu and seemed favorably inclined towards a “two-Chinas” policy. So Chiang threatened to leave the UN before he’d let the PRC in, then claimed the ROC military was so eager for an offensive that even he might not be able to stop it. It didn’t take a genius to figure out that this was a bluff—senior ROC officials even said as much, possibly on Chiang’s own orders—and it was eventually understood that Chiang just wanted guarantees regarding “two Chinas,” more military hardware, and U.S. consent to some fruitless guerrilla raids on the mainland, so it would look like shit was actually being done w/r/t “retaking the mainland” when Taipei was really just twiddling their thumbs hoping it would sort of fall into their laps.

    • BiloSagdiyev

      To more than a few Americans, they’re all the same.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_CaZ4EAexQ

      • The Pale Scot

        That was great.

    • patrick II

      Occasionally there is payback for really stupid statements. I was in the Navy, stationed in Japan from 1968 to 1970. Two fellow sailors took a long cab ride back to base with a cab driver who was unfamiliar with the local streets and took a somewhat longer route to the base. My friends, being nineteen-year-old assholes, and not realizing that because most people around you don’t speak English doesn’t mean that no one around you speaks English, complained to each other that fking J#ps couldn’t find their ass with both hands. After a bit, the cab driver turned and said “Oh yeah? Well, we found Pearl Harbor, didn’t we?”

    • ajp

      Even if, say, it were a Japanese restaurant instead, that’s one hell of a non sequitur. The fuck does that have to do with the food?

      Also, obligatory:

      “Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?”

      “Germans?”

      “Forget it, he’s rolling.”

  • Hogan

    No mojitos for you, little Erick! Remember the Maine!

    • witlesschum

      Put down that Poutine, lest the heros of Lundy’s Lane be forgot!

  • dmsilev

    I’m disappointed in Erick, son of Erick, scion of the House of Erick. Based on previous tweets, I would have expected him to shoot up some sushi with a shotgun and post a picture of the result.

    I think he’s going soft.

    • I think we can be sure that if he did decide to go that route he would have shot up a bowl of Lo Mein.

      • DrDick

        More likely, a plate of chop suey.

        • Lee Rudolph

          Shoot one from Column A and one from Column B.

        • Malaclypse

          Oh God, I remember growing up and my parents getting canned chop suey as a “treat” every week. The bottom three-fourths of the can was the chop suey, the top was the noodles. Think it was “La Choy” or something like that. I was in high school before I found out that Chinese food was not actually inedible glop.

          I’d repressed that memory until now.

          • wjts

            I have vague memories of the Chop Suey in my elementary school cafeteria, but like the man said, the most merciful thing in the world is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents.

          • Hey! I remember that! It was considered the Heighth of elegance. Our 99 year old neighbor pronounces Heigthth that way and I’m sure she thought so when that stuff hit the market.

          • Malaclypse

            It still exists, amazingly. I’m tempted to go looking for a can, just to explain to mini-Mal that she has no idea how good she has it.

            • joe from Lowell

              Remember the old McDonald’s coffee?

              • Malaclypse

                In every detail. Served so hot that the lawsuit was completely justified (have I mentioned recently that Neiporente is an asshole?). Kept that hot until it was scorched and undrinkable. Useful only if you were falling asleep while driving, and even then only drinkable if one sank so low as to add milk to it.

                • joe from Lowell

                  So, Mrs. joe from Lowell from Pittsburgh and I were driving back from western Pennsylvania a few years ago and went through a McDonald’s drive through for coffee. “Hey, look, they still use the old cups. Isn’t that interesting?”

                  Big gulp: “Uggggghhhhhh!”

                • DrDick

                  Kept that hot until it was scorched and undrinkable.

                  Which normally took about 30 seconds.

                • My favorite bit from that thread, so far (I remember it at the time but I’m re-enjoying it): Nieporent quoting a bunch of sources saying, essentially, “the hotter water is the faster it gives you third degree burns”, and concluding:

                  Even if the coffee should have been somewhat cooler, she’d have received the same injuries

                  Apparently he comes from a universe where first, second, and third degree burns are discrete states, and once you get a third degree burn there’s no way for anything to get worse; at that point, the excess energy stored in the water just dissipates into space rather than, for instance, causing damage over a wider area or to deeper tissues.

                  Using his logic, there’s no difference between boiling food for a second or for an hour; similarly, a second of exposure to steam is as thoroughly sanitizing as a minute or ten minutes. Someone should let industrial kitchens, autoclave manufacturers, canners, etc. know that Legal Genius David M. Nieporent, Esq., KBE, OT7 has figured out a way for them to save a lot of time and money.

              • The Pale Scot

                McMud

          • solidcitizen

            1 pound browned ground beef
            Two cans of La Choy chop suey
            One can cream of mushroom soup
            Salt
            Mix together, place in casserole dish, top with La Choy crunchy noodles
            Bake at 350 for 30 minutes or until crunchy noodles start to burn

            Serve, relive childhood.

          • advocatethis

            We grew up on that, too (must have been inexpensive). When I was about 8 or 9 our “Chinese” food horizons expanded with the introduction to the menu of egg foo young.

          • Latverian Diplomat

            Chop Suey was a dish invented by Chinese immigrants to appeal to the American palate, and La Choy couldn’t even get that right.

        • Pseudonym

          Erick being Erick, I could see him shooting up some adobo and lumpia, though it wouldn’t be so bad if he stuck to balut.

  • Warren Terra

    In addition to the obvious, I would bet dollars to beef and broccoli lunch specials that the “Asian food” the Ericksons were abstaining from was Chinese food.

    I had the same reaction, but also: it’s more than likely that it was marketed as Chinese Food but largely unrecognizable as such to actual Chinese people, a gloopy pile of Americanized Chinese Food specialties rather less familiar beyond these shores.

    • ijkcomputer

      Erick Erickson grew up (or passed through the ages of 5-15, anyway) in Dubai. No idea on the availability of any sort of East Asian food there in the 80’s, or how often the children and parents of Ericks must have eaten it to make “no asian food today, it’s December 7” come up.

      Before and after those ages they lived in Jackson, LA, which today has 3,842 people and (literally) 15 Asians, so, nu.

      • rea

        Technically, if you live in Dubai, all your food is Asian.

        • Nah, they import everything as in Guam. Most of it from other places in Asia no doubt, but they certainly have spam, etc.

      • rm

        Well, the 15 people could all work at that one restaurant.

    • UserGoogol

      Well I mean, authenticity in cuisine is bullshit. Most American Chinese food was developed by Chinese-Americans (although with inexplicable stuff like crab rangoon thrown in via “Polynesian” food) albeit with white Americans largely in mind as their audience. Chinese cuisine is very diverse with a lot of different styles, America might as well have its own style.

      I mean your point regarding Erick’s comments still basically apply, but I mean come on, do not besmirch the good name of General Tso.

      • Warren Terra

        although with inexplicable stuff like crab rangoon thrown in via “Polynesian” food

        I think you mis-spelled “inexcusable”.

        • Murc

          I’ll fight you.

          • Thirtyish

            Seconded. Crab rangoon is one of those things that makes life worth living.

        • Malaclypse

          I once dated a woman who was positively incensed by the idea of crab rangoon, because, as she rightly pointed out, no real Chinese food is dairy-based.

          This may have been the moment I realized it was possible to be factually correct and completely wrong at the same time.

          • The Temporary Name

            A billion people NOT coming up with crab rangoon might be construed as a failure.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        Don’t you ever dream of setting up a restaurant in Beijing and serving Kraft macaroni and cheese and grilled cheese sandwiches? It it just me?

        • Warren Terra

          1) Serving Kraft Dinner would make it a Canadian restaurant, not an American one.
          2) I’m sure there are American-style diners in Beijing. And there’s obviously McDonalds, Pizza Hut, and the apparently very popular KFC.

          • DrDick

            Just do not order the mayonnaise pizza at Pizza Hut in Tokyo.

            • sparks

              But the Mayo Potato pizza would be Erik’s favorite, no tomato sauce at all!

              • I like tomato sauce. It’s not like those horrible Korean pizzas where ketchup is used instead.

                • sparks

                  Okay then, maybe I’ll stop needling you now. Being Californian, I just will not have any disrespect for the tomato.

          • burritoboy

            Something like over 100 restaurants in Beijing claiming to serve American cuisine (not all diners, of course). There is a mainland Chinese-born chain of imitation American brewpubs (started by some American expats but begun in Beijing itself.)

            • I wonder if Chinese cities have an America-town?

              And if so, what would it look like?

            • Lee Rudolph

              So, do any of those 100 serve chop suey, “American chow mein”, or both?

              • There was a great Trader Vic’s in Singapore, with puupuu platters and everything.

                • Lee Rudolph

                  But aren’t the best tailors in Hong Kong?

                • Scott Lemieux

                  I hope your hair was perfect.

            • Ken

              According to my copy of Chinese Gastronomy, Chinese restaurants often kept a stock-pot on low simmer on the stove. All the vegetable and meat scraps were thrown in; stock was drawn off and filtered when needed. Some of them kept the stock going for years.

              I suppose the American cuisine equivalent would be to use the same deep-fryer oil forever.

        • TheSophist

          It can be next door to my gourmet burger joint “The Kosher Cheeseburger.”

          • DrDick

            Is that close to The Vegan Steakhouse?

            • Barry_D

              They share a kitchen, along with the Hallale Berry Humungous Humous Hut (specialty – humous with dipping bacon!).

      • brownian

        But you’re right; the contribution of Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians to western Chinese food shouldn’t be discounted. I may be wrong, but I’d thought that Western Chinese food came about from early immigrants trying to prepare their traditional dishes with the ingredients available in North America of the 19th and 20th centuries. Recognizing this, a few years ago the Royal Alberta Museum held an exhibit called “Chop Suey on the Prairies” exploring the history of Chinese food in prairie Western Canada (the Western dish “ginger beef” was, like Ted Cruz, invented in Calgary.)

        And an acquaintance of mine has been working to have green onion cakes recognized as an official food of Edmonton, to recognize the relationship between the foodstuff popularized at local festivals by northern Chinese immigrants in the 80s.

        • Just_Dropping_By

          Coincidentally, I happen to have seen that exhibit. It was very interesting, but it failed to answer my biggest question about the difference between Chinese-American and Chinese-Canadian cuisine — why were dry garlic spareribs ubiquitous for many years in Canadian Chinese restaurants, while in American Chinese restaurants (even those in Seattle) not only were they not available, but nobody was even familiar with them?

          • brownian

            Interesting question, especially when you point out that they were unavailable in Seattle. I wonder what other foods stop at the border. Do people in Seattle ever drink caesars?

            • keta

              They’d never heard of Clamato juice in FX McRory’s in about 1990.

              Philistines.

              • Scott Lemieux

                The first time I ever met Loomis was at FX McRory’s. I dunno if it was good back in the day, but when I ate there it was awful. I think the clam chowder was made with Elmer’s.

                On the original issue, I found it odd that when I moved to Montreal for school nobody knew what ginger beef was. I just assumed it was a ubiquitous Chinese dish.

                • I vaguely remember a large circular table with you and Watkins. I remember alcohol. I do not remember food. Perhaps for a good reason as you describe it.

                • keta

                  It was so-so then, and decidedly not very good the last time I was there, about ten years ago.

                  The grub at Safeco field was miles better.

          • Warren Terra

            why were dry garlic spareribs ubiquitous for many years in Canadian Chinese restaurants, while in American Chinese restaurants (even those in Seattle) not only were they not available, but nobody was even familiar with them?

            One obvious reason is that they’re a very Cantonese dish, and Chinese immigration in Canada (especially but not only in BC) skews heavily Cantonese (it’s the Hong Kong / Commonwealth connection). A lot of the earlier Chinese immigration to the US, especially the west coast, was also Cantonese, but much less of the later Chinese immigration, especially on the east coast.

            ETA dry fried garlic spareribs were definitely available in Seattle, way back in the 80s – in Cantonese Restaurants. There’s one in particular that I can picture but can’t quite name that had them as a signature appetizer (in the ID, on the 2nd floor of a building, a large and famous Hong Kong-themed seafood place).

            • Just_Dropping_By

              Thank you for that insight into the origins. I thought there might be some sort of Chinese regional origin thing in play, but didn’t know enough to even begin a proper investigation of the issue.

            • LeeEsq

              This is something that I know about. Chinese immigrants to the United States during the 19th and for the bulk of 20th century, the Chinese Exclusionary Act might made it hard for the Chinese to come over but it didn’t stop them from trying, was basically nearly all Cantonese. After the INA based, most of the Chinese immigration that came over was from Taiwan or Hong Kong during the 1960s to the 1980s. When mainland immigration picked up again during the 1980s, it was heavily from Fujian Province. Its still heavily from Fujian but more Northern Chinese are also immigrating.

        • leftwingfox

          Hah, I remember the proliferation of Spring Onion cakes. I seem to recall them coming out of the Mongolian Experience restaurant, although that might be selection bias.

      • LeeEsq

        General Tso’s Chicken is an interesting dish because we know its origins. The chef who invented it is still alive. He was an anti-Communist Chinese man who immigrated to the ROC. General Tso and Mao were both from Hunan Province and the chef who invented the dish wanted to honor somebody from his province but not Mao. He selected a 19th century Qing general instead.

  • Crusty

    I went through a phase when I was a kid when I was putting teriyaki sauce on almost everything.

    • Jackov

      Tonkatsu sauce works on just about everything.

      Don’t tell Lick Rickshaw, but I would better some number of soldiers and sailors had “Asian food” in Honolulu just days after Pearl Harbor.

      • For sure they had spam. Not sure what ethnicity that is, at this point.

        • J. Otto Pohl

          Isn’t it Korean now?

        • Hogan

          Nigerian?

        • Bill Murray

          Minnesotan

        • TheSophist

          The Hormel family lives in Phoenix. For my sins, I taught a couple of them back in the day.

          • Fats Durston

            One semester I taught a class in the Hormel Ham classroom in the Carlson School of Business building.

            • DrS

              So, what if we *are* exceptional, but it’s just all in ridiculous

    • Warren Terra

      Because you hated America? Or because you hated food?

    • Thirtyish

      My obsession was always soy sauce. I practically drank that stuff.*

      *Why yes, I do love salt.

      • brownian

        I still do drink that stuff. It’ll take the edge off a hangover while you’re waiting for the coffee to finish brewing.

        I broke up with someone because she didn’t recognize the obvious superiority of Kikkoman soy sauce over the stuff that came with take-out.

        We’re still friends due in no small part to our agreement to avoid eye contact with each other when reaching for the soy sauce at dim sum.

        • A lot of the soy sauce you get in packets is fake. It’s just saltwater dyed brown with some MSG added. Kikkoman isn’t fancy but it’s actual brewed soy sauce (and it still kind of defines what soy sauce tastes like to me). It is to soy sauce what something like El Jimador is to tequila or Evan Williams is to bourbon: the cheap end of the real thing, but miles beyond the imitation stuff.

          The easy way to tell fake soy sauce is that it contains caramel color.

          • brownian

            And the taste. The fake stuff is unmistakeably, awfully flat. Just salt and umami. A brewed soy sauce has some depth to it. Often local restaurants would serve the fake stuff out if the Kikkoman dispensers. Should merit some sort of bylaw infraction.

            I know it’s not a fancy soy sauce, but it defines soy sauce for me as well. And it’s easy enough to find in grocery stores. Tamari less so, but still more often days:

            Because I hate throwing stuff away, I keep the crappy packets if they come with an order of take out, and use them in cooking, like when I need to deglaze a pan. I feel like I need absolution or something.

            • Is there a really great brand of soy sauce those who know recommend?

            • DrS

              Haha. I have a growing collection at work of those damn packets too cause I can’t throw them away. Like, that’s wasting food or at least food like substance.

  • royko

    According to Wikipedia, he spent ages 5-15 in Dubai. I don’t know how common Japanese food was in Dubai in the 80s.

    He’s also just a little younger than me. I don’t know how old his parent are — my father was born before WWII broke out, my mother after it ended. But my parents were pretty run-of-the-mill for their generation, and Dec 7 never held any special significance in our household. Unless it was mentioned in the news, we never noticed, and even when it was, it was more of an “oh yeah, day of infamy” recollection. And while “Chinese” food would have been fine with my parents on that night, I doubt it ever happened, just because we didn’t eat it that often. It would have been rather an unlikely coincidence for us to ask for it on that particular date.

    If his story is true, his parents seem weirdly preoccupied with Pearl Harbor for that generation. (Personally, I think it’s BS.)

    • Warren Terra

      I don’t know how common Japanese food was in Dubai in the 80s.

      I’m guessing there were a lot of Filipino cooks, although possibly they served little of their native cuisine to White folks.

      ETA: not to imply that Japanese = Filipino, just that the original statement was about “Asian Food”, and you introduced Dubai.

      • Pseudonym

        Boycotting food cooked by Filipinos to stick it to the Japanese would be pretty much peak Erick.

        • Ken

          Another sighting of the rare peak wingnut. I’ll log it in my birding journal.

          • Pseudonym

            It’s usually sighted nesting in Pterocarya fraxinifolia from what I hear.

    • Bob Loblaw Lobs Law Bomb

      And I would bet dollars to beef and broccoli lunch specials that the actual number of times that eating “Asian” food on December 7 came up in the Erickson family was “zero.”

    • DrDick

      Hell, my father served in WWII in the Pacific (on Guam, Saipan, and Iwo Jima) and we never paid any attention to Dec. 7. My mother’s younger brother was also on a ship that was attacked by the Japanese.

  • Denverite

    I could so totally murder a spicy tuna roll.

    • c u n d gulag

      ME TOO!

      But what I really want, is eel!!!

      • DrDick

        Unagi!

        • Thirtyish

          Danger!

      • Uni for me… but not anymore. Sea urchin stocks have been really suffering from overfishing and climate change. Not that other sushi options tend to be much better. There are some sushi places in Portland that only sell sustainable (and pricey) fish, but in general I’m pretty gloomy about the prospect for sushi (and fish in general) in the future, and can’t help but feel guilty about eating it.

  • Joe_JP

    Leftists upset my parents wanted us to avoid Asian food on Pearl Harbor Day when we were growing up. Didn’t realize it was that big a deal

    Erick Erickson responding to critics on Twitter.

    Meanwhile, an ad below the encourages me to join the NRA and get a free pocket knife. Only $25!

  • Bugboy

    “Growing up…” – Erick “Erick” Erickson

    He grew up? I thought he still lived in his mother’s basement?

    But seriously folks, this explains a lot about Erick “Erick” Erickson…

    • Bill Murray

      he is likely taller than he was at age 5

      • BiloSagdiyev

        Either way, I didn’t know they stacked it that high!

  • Fighting Words

    Thanks. I was wondering what to get for lunch today. I guess I will go with sushi.

    Also, when I was a fresh faced college grad, I remember applying to the JET program to teach English in Japan. I sent in my application on December 7 (which was the deadline). Needless to say, I wasn’t accepted.

    • Mike G

      The cartoonist Ted Rall used to work for a Japanese bank in NYC. They would distribute the annual bonuses on Dec 7. Who knows whether this was an inside reference or a coincidence.

  • Thirtyish

    I don’t care if Erick “Erick” Erickson abstains from “Asian” food. It means more for me. In fact, I was wavering between pizza tonight and sushi from Seamless, but now my mind is pretty well made up.

    • Lee Rudolph

      I was wavering between pizza tonight and sushi from Seamless

      Why choose? (A little-known feature of the Axis. Ignore the Canadian behind the curtain.)

  • MattT

    Even Hank Hill and Dale Gribble managed to ask Khan if he was Chinese or Japanese. This is really a pretty low bar, but somehow it still couldn’t get cleared.

    • witlesschum

      If Mike Judge had created Erick son of Erick, he’s be funnier, but not any more ridiculous.

      • BiloSagdiyev

        Check out the photo Salon.com runs of Erick every time he opens his yap and they broadcast it. He looks just like Bobby Hill in that picture.

        It makes me sad, though, because Bobby is a good person.

  • Charlie

    With any luck, Erickson’s tweet will inspire sushi restaurants to put an “eye roll” on the menu.

    /rimshot

  • LeeEsq

    Time magazine ran an infamous article on how White and presumably African-Americans could tell the difference between Chinese and Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor, so its not like the stupidity of Eric’s family is without precedent.

    • Warren Terra

      This is of course a recurring problem, as the families of the American Sikhs assaulted and murdered after 9/11 can tell you. Not that it would have been any more acceptable to assault Arabs or Muslims, of course, it’s just interesting that people can so passionate about their racism that they will kill for it and yet know so little about the people they so hate.

      • so-in-so

        They know these people are “different”, and that is sufficient for them.

      • John F

        I never got how idgits could mistake Sikhs for moose limbs since Sikhs have such distinctive head gear, different from any moose limb group I’ve ever heard about…. but I guess the thought process goes, “not a cowboy hat or ball cap… therefore that’s a towel wrapped around his head meaning he’s an A-Rab…”

    • Randy

      An uncle used to tell a story of standing in line at a Target store behind an Asian gentleman. The checkout clerk was also Asian, and when she saw the man in front of my uncle, she let out a stream of friendly chatter in her native language. The man said he was Korean, and did not understand Chinese. According to my uncle, she replied with “Sorry. We all look alike to me.”

      • LeeEsq

        In my experience, the different ethnicities from East and South East Asia tend to define the different groups as strictly as European do.

        • Randy

          There may be even more strictness in the US, where a lot of people winder “Japanese, Chinese, Korean–what’s the difference?”

          BTW, the uncle who told that story was wounded in the leg while serving in the Pacific Theater in WWII. He bore the Japanese no apparent ill-will.

          • LeeEsq

            Its the same in Africa. In his PBS documentary on African-American history, Louis Gates pointed out that the different ethnic groups in Africa consider the differences between themselves just as important as the different European ethnicities do.

            • J. Otto Pohl

              Sometimes a lot more important. There are still people who won’t vote NPP because it is Akan dominated and the Asante engaged in slave raids against their people a couple of centuries ago.

        • Pseudonym

          Are you suggesting that Europeans do define the different groups strictly? I don’t think I could reliably tell the difference between someone who’s British vs. French vs. German vs. Polish based on looks, whether European or first-generation European-Americans.

          • LeeEsq

            Look wise maybe yes or maybe no depending on the circumstances but culturally definitely.

          • ajay

            I don’t think I could reliably tell the difference between someone who’s British vs. French vs. German vs. Polish based on looks, whether European or first-generation European-Americans.

            Well, here’s a quiz to find out!

            http://johnfinnemore.blogspot.co.uk/2006/12/willkommen-bienvenue-welcome.html

  • Thirtyish

    In addition to the obvious, I would bet dollars to beef and broccoli lunch specials that the “Asian food” the Ericksons were abstaining from was Chinese food.

    Given that my self-identifying-as-liberal mother absolutely cannot distinguish between Chinese and Japanese cuisine (no matter how many times I have explained it to her), you could bulldoze me down with a feather of the Ericksons knew the difference. In fact, I would be shocked if they could even name any countries in that part of the world besides China and Japan.

    • Bob Loblaw Lobs Law Bomb

      Also, I bet this mythical culinary prohibition (assuming it existed at all) was on “oriental food.”

  • so-in-so

    I wonder if they ate good ‘American’ food, like pizza, spaghetti or frankfurters.

    • Malaclypse

      Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?

  • Joseph Slater

    I was literally eating sushi when I discovered this post/thread/quote. No causal connection, but I’m now feeling even better about doing it.

  • creature

    My late father’s birthday was December 7th. He served in the Army Air Corps in the Pacific Theatre (Phillipines), then in the Army during the Occupation in Germany (he was 1st generation German-American, with top-notch language skills). He and I got some static in a bar once, when we were having ‘happy birthday’ drinks. Some dude got upset we were so happy, chimed in about ‘day of infamy, etc.’ Pop looked him in the eye and said, ‘Phillipines, ’45, Germany, ’45 to ’50’, and went back to his drink. I asked the questioner whether he needed help out to the parking lot. He wisely declined- at that point in my life, I probably would have seriously injured the guy.

    Fuck Erick of Ericktown.

  • Pingback: Erick Erickson: as Vile and Stupid as Ever | Frankly Curious()

  • Emily68

    I am in the process of reading, one day at a time, the >500 letters my dad wrote to his then girl-friend (later his wife and my mom) during WWII. I’ve learned he shared many of the prejudices of his day (he describes his good friend as a “Philadelphia kike”!) but twice, so far, he’s gone to a movie and been upset with people cheering the deaths of Japanese soldiers. He qualifies this by saying that he’s as much against the Japs as anybody, but people in the movie theatre, especially children, cheering the deaths of other guys is pretty upsetting for him.

    That said, my mother wouldn’t agree to buy a VW until ~1968. Those Germans started two world wars and we weren’t buying their car, even if it was a good one.

    • BiloSagdiyev

      My father had to fight the Nazi bastids and got wounded in the process, but it didn’t stop him from buying two Porsches in the late 50’s. As he told me, when it was all over, he wasn’t mad at German soldiers, he was mad at Nazis, and officers in general, both sides.

      Now, all that being said, the Pacific war was full of some intense hatred all around.

      • Jackov

        American racial views (and propaganda) allowed for the existence of the ‘good German.’ The Japanese were a collective evil – ‘the Jap.’ “War Without Mercy” examines the racialized propaganda used by both the Allies and Japanese which certainly played a role in the hatred and brutality in the Pacific.

    • keta

      I am in the process of reading, one day at a time, the >500 letters my dad wrote to his then girl-friend (later his wife and my mom) during WWI

      That is very cool.

      I’m an inveterate writer of so-called snail mail and despite the return on that investment hovering at about 5% I’ve managed to hang on to most all the mail I’ve received over many years. It’s a real treat to occasionally delve into that repository.

      Enjoy your journey.

  • Fine, I’m not eating European food on Columbus Day.

    The skeptic in me does wonder when this family tradition began. Was it passed down to his parents from their parents (which would make sense) or were his grandparents normal human beings and one or both of his parents are assholes?

    Or is he just a lying sack of shit?

    • Pseudonym

      Are those options mutually exclusive?

    • brugroffil

      Probably the same amount of truthiness as Carson’s “Most Honest Man Ever!” test and Trump’s [insert large number of obviously bullshit claims]

    • Warren Terra

      On July 4 you should avoid the dishes that are products of transporting New World crops to Europe – so, no pizza, no french fries, no turkey. And nothing with corn syrup. That last includes ketchup, which will please Loomis.

      On the other hand: the traditional grilled meat patty or sausage on a bun with mustard and mayo is entirely European, so long as you don’t put a sliced tomato on it. So that’s safe.

      • Lee Rudolph

        On the other hand: the traditional grilled meat patty or sausage on a bun with mustard and mayo is entirely European, so long as you don’t put a sliced tomato on it.

        A slice of beetroot, Kiwi style, will contribute an equivalently festive color while maintaining Old World foodstuff cred.

  • I refrain from Italian food on Good Friday for the very same reason.

  • My family would eschew English Muffins on the 4th of July because that’s how we rolled.

    • ajay

      My family would eschew English Muffins on the 4th of July

      Eschew, but not eswallow?

  • LWA

    Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?

    I so badly want to re-edit that epilogue to show Bluto driving down the road- “Mr. and Mrs. Erick Bin Erick”

  • Mike G

    The kind of stupid that brought us Freedom Fries.

  • BethRich52

    This tweet reminded me of the episode of Mad Men where Roger Sterling wouldn’t take on Honda as a client because of World War II.

    • BiloSagdiyev

      Roger, while a fictional character, did at least have friends killed by them, and his own ass on the line in the Pacific.

      Today’s GOP is mostly just garden variety bigots.

  • bexley

    In the Erickson household you ate your ham and bananas hollandaise and you liked it!

  • Warren Terra

    Speaking about Trump thriving

    Donald Trump Calls for Barring Muslims From Entering U.S.
    Donald J. Trump called on Monday for the United States to bar all Muslims from entering the country until the nation’s leaders can “figure out what is going on,” an extraordinary escalation of his harsh rhetoric aimed at members of the Islamic faith in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif.

    :

    • ajay

      Donald J. Trump called on Monday for the United States to bar all Muslims from entering the country until the nation’s leaders can “figure out what is going on”

      That could take some time.

  • q-tip

    I am Erickson’s age, apparently.

    My dad was a child of WWII* – born in Denmark in 1936, so his earliest memories involve German soldiers. (The ones they had to house, or how the kids in town all hid their bikes when rumors came down that the Germans were heading back right before V-E day – that kind of thing. It wasn’t Children of the Sun, don’t get me wrong.)

    He reacted to this by studying German in college, moving to Berlin to get his PhD, and pursuing an academic specialization that took him to Germany at least once a year while he was an active academic.

    What would Erickson say? “Uncle Tom?” Probably not, because Germans are white etc.

    *My mom was too, but a bit younger, and her family was already in the US – her wartime memories are less specifically wartime memories.

    • q-tip

      PS: I was so angry at EE there and used hyperbolic language – I shouldn’t have described my dad’s treason/selling out/whatever (per Erickson) as Uncle Tom-ism (per Erickson). Being a Dane under German occupation was far from the worst way to spend the war, and can’t compare with what the actual Uncle Tom went through.

      EDIT: yes, I know that Uncle Tom was a fictional character, etc.

      Apologies if that metaphor offended anybody. EE just pissed me off so much. Not least because he’s presumably a fellow ScandAmerican.

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