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The Wages Of New Jersey’s Nixon

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But it was worth it — to inflict retaliation on a politician who refused to grant you an irrelevant endorsement!

Emergency responders were delayed in attending to four medical situations – including one in which a 91-year-old woman lay unconscious – due to traffic gridlock caused by unannounced closures of access lanes to the George Washington Bridge, according to the head of the borough’s EMS department.

The woman later died, borough records show.

A definitive example of Republican governance.

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  • Ralph Wiggum

    I mean, the gall of the man to support the candidate of his own party. Why couldn’t he play nice like all the other officeholders in New Jersey and grovel before Christie like a good boy? Inflicting inconvience, misery and death upon his constituents was a proportionate response.

  • brad

    Yeah, but her grandchildren were probably Buono voters.

  • cpinva

    but wait! Christie was shocked, just shocked to find this out!

    • Larry
    • Regular Guy

      but wait! Christie was shocked, just shocked to find this out!

      This only makes him look more presidential.

      To his credit, he immediately fired those responsible and came clean before the cameras. He also said that HE was responsible for what happened on his watch.

      I wish the current federal administration would have had this kind of honesty, transparency and communication in Benghazi, IRS targeting scandal and the ACS goatfuck.

  • Tom Servo

    What happened is of course terrible. But it’s nice to see something stick to Christie. There was already no excuse for an intelligent person to not see him for who he is. Now maybe it’ll stick. With any luck, it’s the first nail in Christie’s coffin.

    • jim, some guy in iowa

      it’s certainly something to hope for – and I certainly plan to keep it in mind if he actually does come to Iowa waddl – running – for President

      • Murc

        No way in hell Christie was going to run in Iowa anyway. Or South Carolina, for that matter. His path to the White House led (and still might lead) through New Hampshire and then the midwest.

        I actually wouldn’t be surprised if Christie did not, in fact, have any idea about this [i]specific[/i] event until it started getting press about a month or so ago. It’s a “Will no-one rid me of this turbulent priest?” kind of thing. Christie didn’t need to know what specific acts of petty political vengeance his underlings would enact, but it would be strange if he didn’t know his staff was full of people who would enact petty political vengeance. In fact, that’s probably a point in their favor with him.

        In any event, this may not stop him, as the Republican field in 2016 is shaping up to be like the field in 2012; a collection of guys who each individually should not be capable of winning the nomination except that all the other guys running are also supposedly crippled. When that happens, you always bet on the establishment guy, and if he chooses to run, the establishment guy is gonna be Christie.

        With the caveat that if anti-establishment votes (the teahadis, basically) coalesce early around a single candidate, then all bets are off.

        • Manju

          In any event, this may not stop him

          Sooooo…you can run for Prez while serving time for reckless endangerment?

          • Murc

            Feel like putting money where your mouth is, Manju?

            If you match me, I’ll lay down fifty bucks to the charity of your choice if Christie does time for this at all. Not even ‘before the primaries’ but ‘at all.’

            • john not mccain

              What are the odds he will even be charged? If the mayor of Toronto can get away with smoking crack on video I doubt Christie needs to worry.

              • rea

                Autres pays, autre merde

              • Joey Maloney

                On the other hand, the last two governors of Illinois.

              • Richard

                I’ll give anyone 100-1 that he wont be charged with anything. You would have to prove he knew about it in advance and then that the delay in getting medical attention led to the person’s injury and was foreseeable from closing the lanes. Not possible to prove.

                • FLRealist

                  I don’t know how you can argue that they were unaware that closing the lanes would affect emergency response. It’s a major consideration when discussing traffic control.

                • ajay

                  You don’t need to show that the delay caused the injury to prove reckless endangerment. In fact, you don’t even need to have an injury at all. If I fire a weapon for fun on a crowded street, it’s reckless endangerment even if no one actually gets hit.
                  You have to prove:
                  that he engaged in the conduct wilfully;
                  that he knew, or should reasonably have known, that it would produce a substantial risk of death or injury.

                  NY law is:
                  A person is guilty of reckless endangerment in the second degree when he recklessly engages in conduct which creates a substantial risk of serious physical injury to another person.

                  A person is guilty of reckless endangerment in the first degree when, under circumstances evincing a depraved indifference to human life, he recklessly engages in conduct which creates a grave risk of death to another person.

                  There is also an offence of “obstructing governmental administration” in NY law which has been brought against people who recklessly, for example, collide with police cars during illegal U-turns.

        • panda

          His big problem is that he was swearing that he and his staff knew nothing about the closures up until 3 days ago. This means he either was blatantly lied to by his entire staff and was oblivious about it for months, or that he bold-facedly lied about what he knew. If his staff rolls on him, or if the NJ dems digs up evidence he lied during the coverup, he is toast. If no one can prove he lied, he will need to fire his entire staff, take his lumps as an oblivious buffoon, and hope that the media won’t be digging for other stories and that the story dies slowly. Not an auspicious start for the invisible primary season, especially as other people will be vying for the attention of the money people while he is basically sidelined for a while.

          • herr doktor bimler

            he was swearing that he and his staff knew nothing about the closures up until 3 days ago

            – Even while his appointees to the Port Authority resigned.

            • Joshua

              This was hilarious.

              “We were doing a study” – the flunky Christie installed in the Port Authority.
              “What study?” – Reporters
              “I would like to resign my position” – flunky

              Yea, nothing to see there.

              • rea

                Although, as I pointed out in the thread yesterday, Christie said in a press conference three months after these events that Ft. Lee shouldn’t have three lanes of dedicated onramps, even though the results of closing two lanes had been a massive traffic jam. So, if this was some kind of study, the results didn’t matter to the governor.

            • Tristan

              Well shit, maybe he has been looking north.

        • cpinva

          “When that happens, you always bet on the establishment guy, and if he chooses to run, the establishment guy is gonna be Christie.”

          fortunately for the democrats, almost anyone will look good, by comparison to Christie. his schtick may play in jersey, but I’m guessing a healthy majority of the general electorate will find it annoying. arrogance, when it does work, only works when you have something concrete to back it up with, something that Christie lacks. just being an asshole doesn’t count.

          • Derelict

            just being an asshole doesn’t count.

            It counts for a whole lot among the Teahadists. Unless Christie ends up being removed from office and/or prosecuted, this whole affair will make him more popular with the Republican base.

            Taking direct action against a Democrat politician? Check!
            Making elitist urban people suffer in their urban hellhole? Check!
            Using an arm of government to make government non-functioning? Super-check!
            Lying to the liberal media AND the Demoncrat-controlled legislature?Double-check!!

            For the Teahadi voter, it’s so full of win it’s almost painful.

            • Joshua

              Teabags may be able to get a person through the primary, but they definitely can’t get them to the White House. They can’t even get them to the Senate.

            • Murc

              Christie is DOA among teahadis. There’s his statements regarding that guy who dared to be a judge and a muslim, and there’s all those post-Sandy pictures of him and Obama. Plus you know some snake-handler with far more appeal to them than Christie will be in the race. Say what you will about the teahadis, they can detect when people are not members of their tribe and just faking it. They’re super good at that.

              Like I said, Christie, assuming he does run for President, will sit out Iowa if he has an once of sense, and probably South Carolina as well. He’d go into New Hampshire and swing for the fences, then play towards the midwest.

              • Patricia Kayden

                “They’re super good at that”

                And super good at losing national elections.

              • Guggenheim Swirly

                The Teahadis will fall into line behind Christie if that is what is required to keep Hitlery out of the White House.

                • Manny Kant

                  That is not how they think during the primaries, because they assume that a true “Constitutional Conservative” is exactly what the American people are looking for, and would win easily, and that Romney and McCain lost because of their deviations from conservative orthodoxy. The idea that they will vote for Christie because he is most electable is completely alien to their way of thinking.

                  I don’t think anyone is disputing that Tea Party types will vote for Christie should he be the Republican nominee. But the claim was that Tea Party types will support him in the primaries because he’s an asshole. They obviously will not support him in the primaries, just like they didn’t support Romney or McCain. Christie is the putative candidate of the not-particularly-tea-party Republicans who made Romney and McCain the last two nominees. I assume the argument is that those people aren’t going to want to vote for a giant paranoid asshole.

                • Murc

                  The Teahadis will fall into line behind Christie if that is what is required to keep Hitlery out of the White House.

                  Absolutely true.

                  This has… what to do with who they’ll vote for in the primaries, now?

              • rm

                They were fooled by G. W. Bush.

                I was trying to look it up, but, well . . . there is a moment in one of the Lemony Snicket Series of Unfortunate Events books in which Count Olaf appears disguised as a cowboy. The disguise is so fake and transparent it seems anyone could see through it, but to the orphans’ distress everyone takes the costume at face value. No matter how loudly they scream that this is Count Olaf in a flimsy costume coming to kidnap them, everyone else agrees that this is a good, nice cowboy here to rescue them.

                That’s how I always felt about W. (In fact, I’m certain it was an allegorical jab at W.).

                So, I’m not certain that the Tea People can determine the true believers from the hucksters, nor am I certain which type of leader is more dangerous.

                • Murc

                  They were fooled by G. W. Bush.

                  Er… wha?

                  Bush… never even tried to present himself as a hard-charging right-winger. Not in the primaries, not in the general. If anything, he was lying in the other direction both times, presenting himself as this fuzzy compassionate moderate.

                  I mean, the political environment was different then; the Republicans hadn’t been nearly as radicalized then as they are now (which sounds crazy when you remember how insane they got over Clinton, but it is true) and there were other significant differences. But while GWB was mendacious on many levels, he never went out and tried to convince the craziest part of the GOP he was one of them. And had he tried, he’d have failed.

                • NonyNony

                  They weren’t fooled by W – if you believe that you don’t understand the Tea Party mentality at all.

                  W was exactly what they wanted in 2000. He was an outspoken evangelical Christian who was charismatic on the campaign trail and who could affect a cowboy attitude. He knew all of the codewords and when he was in office did pretty much what they wanted a Republican President to do – he cut taxes (even if it wasn’t their taxes, they could pretend it was), he aggressively postured towards foreign countries, he started wars, and he put some ultra-conservatives on the Court. He was basically the second coming of Ronald Reagan to them for 6 solid years.

                  The only reason they hate him now is because, by being their ultimate President and doing everything they wanted him to he drove the country into a ditch and got a Democratic Congress elected as well as a black guy into the Oval Office. If he’d been able to hold onto the Congress in 2006 and had delayed the crash until his successor came into office in 2008 (the way Ronaldus Maximus was able to foist his problems off onto Bush the Elder in ’88) they’d still be fawning over him and possibly be trying to figure out how to amend the Constitution to get him another term.

                  He didn’t trick them – he was exactly what they wanted and what they still want. The big problem is that what they want is horrible, not that he tricked them into thinking he wasn’t horrible.

                • rm, that is a great take on Count Olaf in ASOUE. One of the chief horrors of the books and the movie (which I love) is the sense you get that the adults around the children take everything at face value, they are absolutely incapable of thinking for themselves or inquiring under the surface of things. Its very hitchcockian, the sense you get that the children and the viewer are shouting warnings and the authorities are ignoring them because they are incredibly stupid and literal–a thing is what it appears to be, not what it does, for example.

                  In that way Count Olaf (and pretty much all the adults) remind me of biblical literalists and tea partiers as well–the emphasis on a morality of surface appearances for themselves, and a hermeneutics of suspicion based on race and religion for everyone else, is really very striking.

                • The activist/pundit elite of the GOP might have soured on Bush, but the “Miss Me Yet” contingent has always been the strong majority of the rank and file. His approval rating among Republicans bottomed out at 68% and is well over 80% now.

                  Also, Bush is more popular among conservatives than moderates, and more popular among very-conservatives than somewhat-conservatives. I don’t think his supporters perceive him as representing a moderate wing of the party.

            • cpinva

              “For the Teahadi voter, it’s so full of win it’s almost painful.”

              fair enough. if the teaberries constituted more than 10% of the total voting population, Christie might be on to something. unfortunately for him, they just make up the bulk of the raving 27% of the GOP, the ones that always vote in primaries.

        • mds

          When that happens, you always bet on the establishment guy, and if he chooses to run, the establishment guy is gonna be Christie.

          Eh, Scott Walker has “For Sale” tattooed on his ass and is publicly Jesusy. He’s also apparently much more effective at targeting his petty, vicious acts of political vengeance. He’s certainly less colorful than Christie, but I’m not sure if that would be a drawback in New Hampshire. He’d also presumably compete well in Iowa and the rest of the Upper Midwest. On the other hand, Christie would have a leg up with the Wall Street crowd, partially offsetting all the Koch that Walker would be getting.

          • BigHank53

            Please. Scott Walker’s ass is for rent. He’d never sell an asset…unless it belonged to somebody else and he was able to get a cut of the action.

    • Front page headline from today’s NYT: “Meticulously Crafted Image of Christie Is Imperiled“. There’s also an editorial calling him a dupe.

      This may blow over, but blood’s in the water. Christie has a tough guy image that is incompatible with both backing down and saying he was fooled by his staff.

      • Incontinentia Buttocks

        Does the article mention that most of that “meticulous crafting” was done by the media?

        • Joshua

          It’s done by the Youtube videos of him yelling at teachers.

        • Barry

          “Does the article mention that most of that “meticulous crafting” was done by the media?”

          The media never discusses from where these things originate (e.g., ‘many think…’, or ‘with a reputation of…’).

        • Amazingly, it does not.

    • Tyro

      There was already no excuse for an intelligent person to not see him for who he is.

      They did see who he was and they found that appealing.

      • Incontinentia Buttocks

        Even putting aside the possibly criminal bullying and the fact that many GOPers apparently think he’s a RINO for not attacking Obama for aiding his state after Sandy (or something), I continue to think that Christie’s political personality has little appeal outside his region. Say what you like about Oklahoma politics, yellers and rage-a-holics don’t typically do well out here. Even before this scandal, he looked to me like a 2016 version of Rudy Giuliani: a media-darling former prosecutor from the northeast with unearned reputations for moderation and “getting things done” but with little ability to appeal to people in places like Oklahoma and South Carolina, let alone Iowa and Minnesota.

        • djw

          I continue to think that Christie’s political personality has little appeal outside his region. Say what you like about Oklahoma politics, yellers and rage-a-holics don’t typically do well out here. Even before this scandal, he looked to me like a 2016 version of Rudy Giuliani: a media-darling former prosecutor from the northeast with unearned reputations for moderation and “getting things done” but with little ability to appeal to people in places like Oklahoma and South Carolina, let alone Iowa and Minnesota.

          Exactly. The type of personality that makes for a successful Republican in NY/NJ just doesn’t translate well to national politics, including Republican primaries.

    • Larry

      Even more luck would be a stake through the heart.

      • Stakes are for heads.

        No – sorry – that’s sticks.

        Never mind.

  • MacK

    My grandmother would have described Christie as “a very small man Ina a very big body”

    • Ralph Wiggum

      Being upset – outraged, even, it seems – at being not endorsed by a Democratic officeholder implies a rather strange desire to be lauded and praised, maybe even loved, even by his enemies. A small man indeed.

      • ajay

        Request for enlightenment:
        I hadn’t realised (non-American here) that the mayor in question was a Democrat. Was it even remotely rational for Christie to expect an endorsement in the first place, given that they’re from different parties? Does that happen a lot – sometimes – at all in the US? It would never happen in the UK, but I know party boundaries are a bit more flexible in the US.

        • Ralph Wiggum

          For whatever reason, Christie was endorsed by a lot of Democrats. I suspect it was a desire to keep their seats, and also get a slice of that sweet, sweet pork. Also, perhaps, some veiled threats.

          http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/10/christie_makes_campaign_announcement_in_burlington_county.html

          • ajay

            Huh. Interesting, thanks Ralph, thanks Panda.

          • postmodulator

            veiled threats.

            “Veiled?” The mayor who didn’t endorse him, Christie murdered one of his constituents.

            • Its ok. According to the FaceBook comments I read under obamacare the 91 year old woman would have been denied hospital care anyway so the EMTs were, presumably, going to offload her into a ditch on the way to the hospital anyway.

              • JKTHs

                See? Christie had nothing to do with. It was all just him carrying out the federal DEATH PANEL MANDATE.

          • Hob

            Yeah, I think once Christie started getting some (shallow) support from some Democrats, he recognized that there was potential political gold there. He would be OK with burning some bridges (so to speak) with the rest of the GOP, if he could get a reputation as one of the few R’s who might be OK for Democrats to vote for. So he was willing to demand a level of support that would normally be considered unrealistic.

        • panda

          I think that this happened quite a bit in Christie’s race, mostly because the person running against him was a sacrificial lamb, and the Democrats in question knew Christie is a vindictive ass.

          • panda

            As for the entire country, my hunch that would be unusual outside the New York-New Jersey area, where the republicans tend to be marginally less awful and the Democrats even more venal than in other regions.

          • mds

            “Sacrificial lamb” was sort of a self-fulfilling prophecy, though.

            “There’s no way a Democratic candidate can win. So we NJ Democrats should give Christie our campaign contributions, endorsements, and votes.”

        • cpinva

          “Was it even remotely rational for Christie to expect an endorsement in the first place, given that they’re from different parties?”

          rational isn’t a word used much in US politics. take it for what it’s worth.

        • Gwen

          The party system in the United States is much weaker than it is in Britain.

          Almost every significant election will feature somebody crossing parties. Every four years we’re treated to the spectacle of “Democrats for [Republican]” and “Republicans for [Democrat].”

          As far as voters go, switchers are a pretty significant bloc, vastly over-represented by elected officials, who will cross parties for a variety of reasons: genuine respect for the guy (rare); ideological compatability (happens occasionally, see Zell Miller); trying to get some benefit for themselves or consitutents; or just plain old spite toward their party’s candidate.

      • Ed

        Christie wants to be loved the way all politicians do, but the motivation in this case I suspect was vindictiveness plus political payback. It isn’t necessarily a bad thing for an executive’s opponents to know that opposing him has consequences, but Christie plainly doesn’t know when to stop, given that he was already on his way to a landslide. Seems the Gov was piqued by this pipsqueak defiance.

        • Drew

          In the case of insubordination I would agree. But merely not endorsing him? Ridiculous.

      • Gabriel Ratchet

        Well, after all, this is a guy who goes to Bruce Springsteen shows and gets publicly upset because The Boss won’t reciprocate his fandom ….

    • David Hunt

      Robert Heinlein once had a character of his describe a person as “a size 12 ego in a size 6 soul.” That’s the image that comes to mind for me.

  • K

    Wow, its as if even god hates people who fuck up traffic for no good reason. Christie closes the lanes, god goes “well, you think you’re a big-shot, ill show you, lets see… Ah, she’s about due” he kicked the proverbial puppie. If this guy ends up running for president in 2016, I would just assume we not have a president. That way, at least whatever chance he has left of becoming president is squashed, cuz we can’t risk it, no matter how small it may be now. Having Christie as POTUS would be worse than not having a president, or just picking a hobo off the streets of DC to do the job.

    • somethingblue

      First Two Thousand Names in the Boston Phone Book 2016!

      • Gregor Sansa

        I’d vote for that ticket for President against most comers.

        About 75% of House members would be better if picked at random from the population. Government by lot/sortition/”citizen jury” is actually a good system. (Of course, the phone book is biased towards old people, so that part is not the best idea.)

        • NonyNony

          I dunno – I’d think that a citizen jury would lead to similar problems that term limits leads to: all of the institutional memory in the hands of unelected bureaucrats whose jobs would be at the capricious whims of people who will disappear without consequences once their terms are finished, elected officials who have strong incentives to maximize the corruption for their time in office to get the best deal for a landing pad when they leave office, etc.

          • Yeah, but the cynicism quotient would go way down. And the odds of people with more ethics than ambitions getting in go way up.

        • mds

          I’d vote for that ticket for President against most comers.

          Wait, aren’t you listed in the Boston phone book? CONSPIRACY.

      • rea

        Don’t you know that people from Massachussetts are unelectable?

        • “Unelectable”? All these years I thought it was “inedible.”

    • JKTHs

      picking a hobo off the streets of DC to do the job

      That’d probably be better than picking a person in Congress in DC to do it.

  • Jonas

    C’mon, it was the mayor’s fault. If only the Democrat had acted in a bipartisan manner, Christie wouldn’t have been forced to kill someone.

    • postmodulator

      Clearly, There Are Extremes On Both Sides. The sensible middle position is clearly to close one lane of the GWB and merely cripple someone’s grandmother.

      • *snort*

      • BigHank53

        Do you work for Politico?

      • TT

        And wingnuts, Centrists, and Bob Woodward alike will also be charitable and not mention this time that Obama personally ordered the murder of four Americans at Benghazi.

        • Patricia Kayden

          Or that Bush II ordered the deaths of scores of diplomats during his administration or that Reagan ordered the deaths of 200+ marines during his administration.

      • Royko

        FACT-CHECK:

        Because there do exist two parties and grandmothers in varying states of health, I rate your comment:

        Mostly 100% True!

        • Tyto

          Wow, eleventy unicorns?! Sweet.

    • ajay

      C’mon, it was the mayor’s fault. If only the Democrat had acted in a bipartisan manner, Christie wouldn’t have been forced to kill someone.

      It’s pretty obvious that the ambulance could have got through if it had really wanted to. If LBJ had been driving, for example.

      • rea

        If, instead of flashing red and blue lights, they’d tried green . . .

        • Guggenheim Swirly

          … being emitted from some sort of, I don’t know, lantern, perhaps?

    • JKTHs

      $50 says we see at least two op-eds saying that this whole thing shows the need for Civility from Both Sides.

      • somethingblue

        Nah, too easy. I think you have to specify the exact pundits. Obviously Brooks and Marcus make the running, but I wouldn’t rule out Dionne.

        Also, Kevin Drum to announce that everybody’s making way too much of this Christie traffic thing and for the life of him he can’t understand what the big deal is.

        • Snarki, child of Loki

          KD lives behind the Orange Curtain. Traffic is a big deal, but no bridges.

        • JKTHs

          I’ll say Marcus, not Brooks (no pseudo-sociology to throw in there). For the second one…Fournier?

  • Incontinentia Buttocks

    If the Governor does it, that means that it is not illegal.

    • Snarki, child of Loki

      “…offer not valid in NJ”

  • Rob

    It was weird that the state traffic information radio station kept playing the Rains of Castamere.

    • Catelyn

      Yeah, I noticed that too.

      • ajay

        And you know who ELSE tried to use his control over a vitally important bridge for political gain?

        • Publius Horatius Cocles

          Um…

          • ajay

            Glad you brought him up, because here’s a bit of both-sides-do-it-ery that is highly relevant.

            ‘Horatius,’ quoth the Consul,
            ‘As thou sayest, so let it be.’
            And straight against that great array
            Forth went the dauntless Three.
            For Romans in Rome’s quarrel
            Spared neither land nor gold,
            Nor son nor wife, nor limb nor life,
            In the brave days of old.

            Then none was for a party;
            Then all were for the state;
            Then the great man helped the poor,
            And the poor man loved the great:
            Then lands were fairly portioned;
            Then spoils were fairly sold:
            The Romans were like brothers
            In the brave days of old.

            Now Roman is to Roman
            More hateful than a foe,
            And the Tribunes beard the high,
            And the Fathers grind the low.
            As we wax hot in faction,
            In battle we wax cold:
            Wherefore men fight not as they fought
            In the brave days of old.

          • ajay

            …even though I was thinking of the Late Lord Frey. Who, like Christie, could field an entire army out of his breeches, though in Frey’s case it was a reference to him having a lot of sons and grandsons, while with Christie it’s just a reference to him having enormous breeches.

            • Barry Freed

              Of the Twins! How could I have forgotten. (For Horatio was I).

              I finally finished ADWD a few weeks ago. I can’t wait for SEK and Steven Attewell to resume their posting podcasts on the series.

  • A definitive example of Republican governance.

    Really? I claim this is a particularly egregious case of pettiness (with disastrous consequences), which can originate from either side of the aisle. Characterizing it as a “definitive” trait of republicans doesn’t advance debate, it just discredits you to republicans who find this as revolting as you do.

    As popular as this blog is, you could think a little more strategically about the content you publish and make a much more meaningful contribution to the public debate.

    • BigHank53

      republicans who find this as revolting as you do

      Now that’s a group you could pack into a minivan. Listen, after the buffoonery, venality, and criminality that the Republican party has shown over the last fifty years, it’s fair to judge that anyone still calling themselves a “Republican” endorses this behavior. Where the hell do you think all those independent voters came from?

    • Concern troll is very concerned.

      • efgoldman

        He was supposed to get a new Snark-O-Meter(tm) for Xmas, too.

    • MAJeff

      Maybe we can get some of Palin and Walker’s friends in the state police to pull your records and have a chat.

    • Origami Isopod

      From Concern Troll’s website: “Tony Boyles is a Computational Social Scientist based in the Greater Washington D.C. Metro Area.” I think he’s hurt that y’all have insulted all his cocktail-party friends. ;__;

    • Yeah!

      Just because Republican voters keep electing Republican politicians who have the morals of a puppy molester and the manners of a rabid stoat doesn’t mean you should cast asparagus on the Republican Party.

      Remember – Every instance of Republican malfeasance that can’t be explained away by claiming the press is on a witch hunt is a fluke and does not reflect on the party or the people who continue to support it.

      • efgoldman

        Stoat? Wow, good Boggle word! Haven’t seen it for years.
        Of course they have the morals of a stoat. They’re all weasels, after all.

        • Snarki, child of Loki

          “They’re all weasels, after all.”

          Not just any weasels. Lying Spin Weasels.

      • sharculese

        I mean, this could have happened to a Democratic politician. I didn’t of course, but that doesn’t mean Tony Bro-boni can’t construct a fantasy scenario in which it does happen.

        • Western Dave

          Clearly you have not been to Philadelphia recently. Where the Democratic mayor can’t get anything done because the Democratic City Council doesn’t think he’s sufficiently differential. And god forbid you want your garbage picked up if you challenge your ward leader. Do I have to go on? My brother once had the choice of voting for the convicted guy or the guy who was merely indicted.

          • sharculese

            Touche.

          • Edwin Edwards

            “Vote for the crook — it’s important.”

          • postmodulator

            the Democratic City Council doesn’t think he’s sufficiently differential.

            The bastards are dragging calculus into it?

      • Just because Republican voters keep electing Republican politicians who have the morals of a puppy molester and the manners of a rabid stoat

        Nicely done. Very nicely done.

        doesn’t mean you should cast asparagus on the Republican Party.

        I would never do that to asparagus. At least not in season.

        • Origami Isopod

          I’d cast asparagus on them… once it was filtered through my kidneys.

    • sharculese

      it just discredits you to republicans who find this as revolting as you do

      I’m 27 years old. That means there has never been a time in my life when the Republican Party was not wholly under the thumb of vicious, petulant psychopaths.

      I’m sorry you think Scott has lost the unicorn vote, but the good news is very few unicorns actually vote.

      • Especially in many Red states, where it is impossible for them to get an ID so they can vote.

        • Random Code

          Especially in many Red states, where it is impossible for them to get an ID so they can vote.

          Yes, because they don’t give them a free ID. Ya’ know the same ID that is required for unemployment, food stamps, or any other government program. Those bastards!

          • sharculese

            Chances Jenny actually knows anything about any of those programs or their requirements: none. Just absolutely not a chance in the world.

            • Not only that, but I can’t believe JenKnob would equate icky stuff like unemployment benefits and food stamps with participating in the Democratic process.

              And of course the “Free ID” statement is misleading because the things you need to get an ID aren’t free.

              • sharculese

                As it so happens I don’t drive and I grew up in Georgia. My father was an active duty military officer, so up until I was 21 I could use my military dependent ID (the only place this was ever a problem was with tattoo artists, for whom the fact that my birth date was printed on the back side interfered with their age documentation requirements. I also never met a tattoo artist who didn’t eventually accept what still was an id issued by the federal government.)

                So when I turned 21 I figured I’d go and get the free voting ID. After all, I met all of the requirements- I had no other form of ID and I needed it to vote. After an hour of searching the driver’s services website for info (because everyone in that position has ready internet access) I learned that I needed to print out and get notarized an affidavit saying I had no other ID and needed one to vote.

                Great. I’m home from school for the weekend, so my dad takes me over to the credit union to see the notary he always uses. What did she want to see before she would stamp my document? A fucking ID. I got it notarized only because my father, who she knew, was there to personally vouch for my identity.

                And even I after I got that done, I still had to take it to the nearest Driver’s Services facility to actually get it notarized, which, while a straight shot up the interstate by car, by public transit would have been a two-hour journey that started with me taking a train in the opposite direction from my destination. Which, combined with the wait time there, means it would have eaten up an entire day, which again, I’m sure everyone who needs a free ID can afford to do.

                • sharculese

                  Oh and while I was there Driver’s Services lost my birth certificate.

      • I’m 27 years old. That means there has never been a time in my life when the Republican Party was not wholly under the thumb of vicious, petulant psychopaths.

        I’m 67 years old, and can make the exact same claim.

    • a particularly egregious case of pettiness

      Not really. Republicans have been trying to delegitimate functional governance, block Democratic access to power, undermine public infrastructure, services, and education, and making policies which directly attack Democratic constituencies precisely because they are Democratic constituencies (e.g. unions, immigrants, independent women, college faculty and students) for decades.

      In terms of harm done, this was penny ante stuff. Medicaid expansion denial will harm more people. Education defunding will harm more communities. Union-busting will destroy opportunity for minorities, skilled labor.

      But it was an abuse of power, rather than a policy, so it gets noticed.

      • Yes–the death of the 91 year old woman, the delay in EMT services and the delay in finding the 4 year old boy are all, basically, the same damned thing as the refusal to expand Medicaid in Red States and the insistence of privatizing everything. Its just that these perfectly extraordinary abuses of Red State Governor’s powers are so enormous and so taken for granted that neither the press nor the country is able to see them. Poor people who would otherwise have been covered under the Obamacare medicaid expansion are going to die every damned day, of totally preventable diseases, for the same reason that 91 year old New Jersey woman died. Because the point of governing, for the current Republican party, is not to help the largest number of people but to prevent them from accessing needed public goods (roads) and needed public services (health care) in order to protect the money of the taxpaying upper classes. This is, btw, literally the only excuse that the Red State governors have advanced for refusing a 90 percent cost free expansion of medicaid in their states. That the 10 percent their own taxpayers would have to pay is too high, or that some future federal government might stop subsidizing it at the 90 percent level. In other words: it costs too much to save lives.

      • MAJeff

        But it was an abuse of power, rather than a policy, so it gets noticed.

        This. So much.

  • Nobdy

    It is unsurprising that the liberals on this site expect big government to provide not only health care but navigable roads to access it. Unbelievable. Do you even wash your own hands after using the bathroom or should the nanny state do that too? If the 91 year old woman were self reliant she would not require an ambulance or road, she would simply carve a path to the hospital herself. Christie did her a favor by not letting her rely on municipal roads just like taking away food stamps and unemployment insurance is a favor to the poor.

    • efgoldman

      Unbelievable.

      Yes, and she should have walked on the tops of all those stuck vehicles, too. But what do you expect from all those takers.

  • MAJeff

    A definitive example of Republican governance.

    Pure, organized, sociopathy.

  • Christie – Blocked a bridge, threw lackeys under the bus, reversed himself on previous statements.

    Christie – Froward into the future!

  • Aaron E. Baker

    What astonishes me more than anything else (and it’s the only reason I retain even a ghost of a doubt as to Christie’s direct responsibility) is the sheer stupidity of what was done (and memorialized in emails no less!). Whatever else he is, Christie isn’t stupid. Perhaps, like Nixon who was no dunce either, he’s so afflicted with arrogant ressentiment, that it lowers his IQ whenever he’s in the grip of it.

    • I think it is kind of late to be astonished by what they say in front of cameras or put in email or otherwise record for all posterity. I prefer to skip straight to glee and mockery. Maybe even a bit of gratitude that they remain unable to grasp the basics of technology.

      Arrogance can make you think you’ll never get caught or held accountable for your actions, so IQ doesn’t enter into it. Someone could be a genius by certain measures, but have the emotional intelligence of a box of lint. I think that’s what’s happening here(and throughout the Republican party.)

      • Random Code

        I think it is kind of late to be astonished by what they say in front of cameras or put in email or otherwise record for all posterity. I prefer to skip straight to glee and mockery.

        Yes, well, that seems to be more important than actual discussion of the issue(s). It’s what you do.

        • The issue that Christie’s Admin. deliberately impeded traffic for several days in a fit of pique?

          Sure, let’s talk about that JenKnob.

        • Origami Isopod
          • How on earth did you find that, OI. It is priceless.

            • I would assume that any cat-owner with a webcam can capture similar pictures when they are not at home.

              • Pshaw. They’ll eat your food in front of you. Hidden cam is how you capture the little blighters constructing their Hominid Mind-Control Rays. (At least until they find the cameras and short ’em out.)

            • Origami Isopod

              Shakezula found it first.

      • mds

        I think that’s what’s happening here(and throughout the Republican party.)

        Well, in fairness, “held accountable” doesn’t seem to be operative for most Republican politicians any longer (except when there are supposed RINOs to be purged). So I can somewhat understand the arrogance.

  • Gypsy Howell

    It’s especially sweet that he closed 3 lanes on the world’s busiest bridge, snarling up traffic for fours days on the anniversary of 9/11. I mean, it’s not like the New York area in general and the GWB in particular could possibly ever, ever be the victim of a terrorist attack, or anything, right?

    • Isn’t that basically what this was? Deliberate damage to infrastructure with flagrant disregard to human harm, in order to make a political point and influence people with fear?

      • This.

        And I really hope Dems give him shit about this. There should be an ad of the concealed face/distorted voice interview variety. “Mr. Christie promised not to cut water and sewage in my town if I endorsed him.” “I wasn’t sure about endorsing Chris Christie, but then I realized that the people in my city wouldn’t want their power cut for three days…”

    • calling all toasters

      the anniversary of 9/11

      It has a name, you know: Benghazi Day.

    • This bears repeating, over and over again. Given the theoretical prominence that both NY and that anniversary have for our Homeland security forces and our imaginary permanent Al Quaeda enemies shutting down a major artery in and out of the city on that anniversary was both an act of extreme stupidity and depraved indifference. Weren’t all security services on high alert on that day–maybe not Elmo Red but high–in case some copycat wanted to stage a repeat or hommage to 9/11? And wouldn’t you expect that tampering with a major artery would bring attention from someone else on the New York side of the port authority? If there had been an incident– or even rumor of an incident– in New York which had sent commuters home, instead of just the ordinary commute, there could have been a major loss of life and of money (which, as we all know, is even more important). Just how indifferent would you have to be to the ordinary functions of government and even the calendar to fuck up 9/11 in New York and New Jersey?

      • If Occupy had tried to march on the bridge to slow down traffic, they’d have been tear gassed, tasered, rubber-bulleted, bean-bag rounded, and if any of them reached into their pocket for anything, shot dead.

        Then their corpses would be charged with terrorism.

  • Royko

    Pareene’s liveblogging the press conference:

    Christie is adding some good, specific details to his narrative of only learning about this yesterday. He didn’t see the emails until yesterday at 8:50 in his bedroom, reading an iPad. But what kind of iPad, governor?? Air? Mini??

  • Sev

    The Governorship also is a bully pulpit. So he bullied. He preached. He got good press, since they like a bully.
    As for doubts that he knew, I think the leaking hostility in his remarks about Fort Lee having 3 lanes are a good indication that he did. As well as his previous buffoonery about the cones.

    • Regular Guy

      This is a northeastern mainstream Republican. I really don’t care.

      Ted Cruz’s chances just went up exponentially.

  • SamR

    The good news for Christie is that I’m pretty sure Springsteen can write a great song about an ambitious politician whose ego got the better of him with tragic consequences and call it “Bridge to Fort Lee.”

  • jgh

    well put. I would just add “At the very least”.

  • DocAmazing

    Mr. Fader–

    You ask a lotta questions for someone from New Jersey.

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