Milk Prices

The fact that milk prices could go up as high as $8 a gallon because of a Truman-era policy that kicks in without a new farm bill is exhibit #113421 that we need a serious reexamination of our entire broken agricultural policy.

24 comments on this post.
  1. JKTHs:

    I think it’s more about the broken political system where the GOP is holding up the farm bill because it wants to cut food stamps.

  2. Erik Loomis:

    In the short term, yes. But that things would go retroactively to an outdated regulation from 1949 is a big problem too.

  3. mpowell:

    It’s a poison pill. Poison pills in legislation are a bad, bad idea. As has been amply demonstrated in the last several years.

  4. c u n d gulag:

    More importantly, what will ro the drug companies stocks when less people are buying pills that allow those who suffer from lactose-intolerance to partake of dairy products?

    OH, THE HUMANITIES!

    Ah, don’t worry Big Pharma – there’s alway’s the ‘quicker-pecker-upper’ pill market.

    On a serious note, this is just another piece of evidence in a long chain of it, that we’re an unbelievably fecked-up country.

  5. Cody:

    Was it put there to make sure Congress always passes an up-to-date farm bill?

    I assume the original crafters thought “No one would screw over the whole country to score a few political points, right?”

  6. Cody:

    I really enjoy soy milk anyways. The vanilla flavoring kind of ruins the health advantage, but it tastes oh so good.

  7. JKTHs:

    I imagine it was so the farm state politicians could go back to their district and say “See? Look what I did for you”

  8. BJN:

    I’m so old that I can remember when the Venezuelan government paid high prices for milk (for schoolchildren in this case) leading to shortages in the private market. Back then it was proof (PROOF) that socialism is the most destructive, evil force on earth, and that Chavez was engaging in crimes on the scale of Stalin’s Ukranian famine.

    That was fun.

  9. JKTHs:

    This is another example of Boehner being unwilling or unable to unify his caucus. The Senate passed a farm bill by a wide margin but the House couldn’t even bring it to the floor.

  10. calling all toasters:

    Let them drink cream!

  11. Ruby:

    …actually, if this would stop food makes from using fucking lactose as an additive in non-dairy food, I would gladly welcome it!

  12. Sammy:

    The government is basically artificially inflating the amount of milk consumption in this country – not the price. Consumers pay for milk both directly and indirectly (through government subsidies) and we pay for all of it already. It’s just if this reverts to the 1940′s way of doing it, most of the cost to consumers is hidden.

    Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

  13. Sammy:

    *is no longer hidden

  14. Kurzleg:

    People still drink milk?

  15. Bitter Scribe:

    If I live to be 500 years old, I will never understand milk pricing regulations. They make the tax code look like Dick and Jane.

  16. Crackity Jones:

    Soy milk bitches

  17. Djur:

    Drinking milk, I can take it or leave it. But you will have to tear cheese from my cold dead &c.

  18. M. Bouffant:

    I’ll tell you this much: Milk prices have risen by 40¢/gall. in the last month or so in Southern Calif.

  19. swearyanthony:

    I think we know who is really at fault here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPhWfSeMYHA&feature=youtube_gdata_player

  20. DrDick:

    Pretty much. For a bunch of anti-tax rugged individualists, the ag community is pretty seriously addicted to that government tet.

  21. DrDick:

    That and my morning yogurt.

  22. treat:

    coconut Vitasoy

  23. DPD:

    About 80% of all subsidies go to agribusiness or large producers.

    My brother has received about $14K since 1995 for his dairy farm. Meanwhile, the largest farm in the area, owned by a family trust, has received $560,000 (18% of the county’s total) over that time period.

  24. Procopius:

    I remember reading that Michelle Bachmann’s family gets about $200,000 a year. The farming scene was very different in 1949 from what we see now. My grandfather suffered greatly in the depression from 1920-1929, as did all farmers. Passage of the Ever Normal Granary bill in the late ’40s was great in providing some stability and security to family farms. They are a much smaller part of the population and economy now.

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