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Border Fence

[ 7 ] December 31, 2011 |

Another good piece on the worthlessness of the border fence. The fence itself just forces people desperate to cross into more dangerous and life-threatening situations. Undocumented immigration has declined the past few years since jobs in the U.S. have dried up and since Obama increased the number of work visas for Mexicans; the border fence had little or nothing to do with it. The fence is incredibly expensive to maintain and is at best an impediment to easy crossing. It’s also an environmental disaster. Meanwhile, the fence does nothing to stop the real danger of the border–drug smuggling:

At night, smugglers toss Hail Marys of pot-stuffed footballs and fling golf-ball-sized heroin nuggets over to waiting receivers. Stealthy ultra-light aircraft bomb the lettuce fields outside town with bundles of dope, then swoop back into Mexico, well below radar but high above the fence.

So long as there are cities on the border, smuggling will occur with impunity.

Of course, the border goes two ways and the U.S. has zero interest in stopping the real driver of mass murder in northern Mexico–the unregulated purchase of guns that are sent to Mexico.

Comments (7)

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  1. Mike says:

    Drugs/ money are the cause of murders in Mexico not the guns. Many central and souh american criminals prefer machetes over other weapons. If we are blaming us guns in mexico, blame the ATF for allowing thousands of firearms to cross the border with no intentions of tracking them.
    Gun sales in border states are pretty well regulated. Wether people chose to follow these regulations is another thing.

    • Erik Loomis says:

      Yes, clearly stronger gun laws would make no difference….

      • Ken says:

        It’s a symmetry thing. Mexico produces a lot of drugs and illegally sells them across the border, causing crime in the US; the US produces a lot of guns and illegally sells them across the border, causing crime in Mexico. Therefore the Mexicans are responsible for the crime in both cases.

    • If we are blaming us guns in mexico, blame the ATF for allowing thousands of firearms to cross the border with no intentions of tracking them.

      If you believe that even a rounding error of the number of American guns that end up in Mexico were those used in ATF stings, you are a sucker.

      Gun sales in border states are pretty well regulated. Wether people chose to follow these regulations is another thing.

      Um, yeah, no; a situation where people are free to not follow regulations, without any effective way to compel them or much effort made to do so is not “pretty well regulated.”

  2. Murc says:

    My great-grandfather ran in hooch from Canada, which was even easier than running stuff across the Mexican border. According to him, none of his cohorts were ever particularly worried about being caught; the cops didn’t have the resources to secure every little cove on Lake Ontario, the local law enforcement stiffs on the ground didn’t give much of a fuck about the booze trade, and the feds, who DID give a fuck, would concentrate on raiding the warehouses and speakeasies (big concentrations, more likely to find an organizational higher-up) rather than catching the stuff in-transport.

    I have seen no evidence that the dynamic today is appreciably different from the 1930s. Well, maybe a little bit; drug running seems to be less socially respectable than booze running was, probably for ugly racial reasons. Still, the house my grandparents were born in and the fine old antiques I will inherit one day were bought with smuggling money.

  3. Witt says:

    Obama increased the number of work visas for Mexicans

    Wait, what? He did? What type of visas?

  4. [...] (typeof(addthis_share) == "undefined"){ addthis_share = [];}While the border wall does virtually nothing to halt human activity on the border and absolutely not…, it does have massive negative impacts on many animals. Given the lack of environmental protection [...]

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